iconoclasm

listen to the pronunciation of iconoclasm
Englisch - Englisch
The belief in, participation in, or sanction of destroying religious icons and other symbols or monuments, usually with religious or political motives
Religious controversy within the Byzantine Empire in the 8th century; emperor attempted to suppress veneration of icons; literally "breaking of images"; after long struggle, icon veneration was restored (p 361)
The doctrine or practice of the iconoclasts; image breaking
Destruction of religious images. In Christianity and Islam, iconoclasm was based on the Mosaic prohibition against making graven images, which were associated with idolatry. The making of portraits of Christ and the saints was opposed in the early Christian church, but icons had become popular in Christian worship by the end of the 6th century, and defenders of icon worship emphasized the symbolic nature of the images. Opposition to icons by the Byzantine emperor Leo III in 726 led to the Iconoclastic Controversy, which continued in the Eastern church for more than a century before icons were again accepted. Statues and portraits of saints and religious figures were also common in the Western church, though some Protestant sects eventually rejected them. Islam still bans all icons, and iconoclasm has played a role in the conflicts between Muslims and Hindus in India
Breaking or destroying of images, particularly those set up for religious veneration Many paintings and statues were destroyed in Eastern Christian churches in the eighth and ninth centuries as a result of the Iconoclastic Controversy In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, especially in the Netherlands, the Protestants also destroyed many religious images
The destruction of religious icons and other symbols or monuments, usually for religious or political motives
{i} actions or doctrines of iconoclasts
Greek word meaning 'icon-breaking' Combat against icons; especially used about an 8th century Eastern movement directed against the veneration of sacred pictures Many icons and other works of art were destroyed by the Iconoclasts, and some religious artists were tortured or even martyred A large number of refugees from the persecutions came to Rome
(Gr "the breaking of icons") It refers to the conflict in the Byzantine Empire between 7~7 and 843 aver the use of icons in the church The Seventh Ecumenical Council (787 and 843) decreed the use of icons, following in the main the teaching of St John of Damascus
(Gr "the breaking of icons") It refers to the conflict in the Byzantine Empire between 727 and 843 aver the use of icons in the church The Seventh Ecumenical Council (787 and 843) decreed the use of icons, following in the main the teaching of St John of Damascus Iconography The study and the art of painting of icons In the Orthodox Church, iconography was developed mainly in the monasteries, which became the centers of its study and development
The belief that there should not be religious pictures, generally seeing them as a form of idolatry The term literraly means icon-breaking This view was state policy in the Byzantine Empire from 730 to 878 and from 815 to 843
the orientation of an iconoclast
iconoclasm

    Silbentrennung

    i·con·o·cla·sm

    Türkische aussprache

    aykänıkläzım

    Antonyme

    iconodulism

    Aussprache

    /ˌīˈkänəˌklazəm/ /ˌaɪˈkɑːnəˌklæzəm/

    Etymologie

    [ I-'kä-n&-"kla-z&m ] (noun.) 1797. From iconoclast.

    Wort des Tages

    epiphany
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