gybe

listen to the pronunciation of gybe
Englisch - Englisch
gybe at: to hesitate, vacillate, or balk when faced with a proposal, plan, or course of action. (Obsolete)
The act of gybing
A sneer. (see gibe.)
To shift a fore-and-aft sail suddenly and forcefully from one side to the other, while sailing before the wind. (also jibe.)
To change tack with the wind crossing behind the boat. (Mostly used of boats and other small sailing craft — the corresponding manoeuver in a sailing ship is to wear.)
To sneer (see gibe.)
A sudden change in direction or approach; vacillation
A sudden shift of a sail's angle, or a sudden change in the direction that a boat is sailing
{v} to shift a boom-sail from one side of a vessel to the other
{n} a sneer, scoff, taunt, reproach
Sometimes it'll be necessary to turn the stern of the boat through the wind This process is fraught with danger as the possibility exists of slamming the sails from one side to the other We will probably perform many gybes, but they will be controlled A gybe is controlled as follows: Generally your on a broad reach or downwind before starting your gybe Accordingly, the sails are set way out to catch the breeze As with tacking, the helmsman will state "Prepare to gybe", followed by "gybe ho!" The gybe begins by sheeting in the sails back to the center of the boat while the helmsman steers the boat's stern through the breeze Once the sails change side the are quickly let back out to resume their duty Piece of cake!
{f} change course, change direction, shift back and forth (Nautical)
A sudden shift of a sails angle, or a sudden change in the direction that a boat is sailing
Variant of jibe
Usually spelled jibe To change direction when sailing in a manner such that the stern of the boat passes through the eye of the wind and the boom changes sides Prior to jibing, the boom will be very far to the side of the boat Careful control of the boom and mainsail is required when jibing in order to prevent a violent motion of the boom when it switches sides Jibing without controlling the boom properly is known as an accidental jibe Tacking is preferred to jibing because the boom is not subject to such violent changes Jibing is usually needed when running with the wind and tacking is used when close hauled
Like tacking, but the wind goes around 'behind' the boat See tacking
shift from one side of the ship to the other; "The sail jibbed wildly"
To change direction by turning down wind and then continuing to turn until you are going in the other direction
To shift from one side of a vessel to the other; said of the boom of a fore-and-aft sail when the vessel is steered off the wind until the sail fills on the opposite side
(British) Jibe
Also spelled jibe To change the course of a boat so that the boom swings over to the opposite side
To go from one tack to the other when running with the wind coming over the stern
To change tack with the wind crossing behind the boat. (Mostly used of boats and other small sailing craft - the corresponding manoeuver in a sailing ship is to wear.)
jibe
A manoeuver in which the stern of a sailing boat or ship crosses the wind
jibe
To perform a jibe
jibe
sudden sweep of the boom of a sailboat across from one side of the boat to the other
jibe
an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect; "his parting shot was `drop dead'"; "she threw shafts of sarcasm"; "she takes a dig at me every chance she gets"
jibe
To go from one tack to the other when running with the wind coming over the stern
jibe
and Gybe
jibe
To change a ship's course so as to cause a shifting of the boom
jibe
– To pass the stern of a boat through the wind during a tack
jibe
The process of turning the yacht so the stern turns through the wind, thereby changing the side of the yacht on which the sails are carried (opposite of tacking); also spelled gybe
jibe
A jibe is a rude or insulting remark about someone that is intended to make them look foolish. a cheap jibe about his loss of hair
jibe
A facetious or insulting remark, a jeer or taunt
jibe
To change direction by turning down wind
jibe
To turn a boat to take the wind on the other side, with the stern going through the wind Unless the jibe is controlled, the boom will bang over and the sudden change of forces can cause momentary lose of control Otherwise a jibe is usually a safe maneuvre
jibe
shift from one side of the ship to the other; "The sail jibbed wildly"
jibe
To change direction by turning down wind and then continuing to turn until you are going in the other direction
jibe
The spelling gibe is also used for meanings
jibe
To bring the stern through the wind
jibe
{f} gibe, mock; fit, be in agreement; change direction, shift back and forth (Nautical)
jibe
To agree; to harmonize
jibe
To shift, as the boom of a fore-and-aft sail, from one side of a vessel to the other when the wind is aft or on the quarter
jibe
be compatible, similar or consistent; coincide in their characteristics; "The two stories don't agree in many details"; "The handwriting checks with the signature on the check"; "The suspect's fingerprints don't match those on the gun"
jibe
To jibe means to say something rude or insulting which is intended to make another person look foolish. `No doubt he'll give me the chance to fight him again,' he jibed, tongue in cheek
jibe
To cause to execute a jibe
jibe
Also spelled gybe To change direction when sailing in a manner such that the stern of the boat passes through the eye of the wind and the boom changes sides Prior to jibing the boom will be very far to the side of the boat Careful control of the boom and mainsail is required when jibing in order to prevent a violent motion of the boom when it switches sides Jibing without controlling the boom properly is known as an accidental jibe tacking is preferred to jibing because the boom is not subject to such violent changes Jibing is usually needed when running with the wind and tacking is used when close hauled
jibe
See Jibe, v
jibe
agree with, as in: His alibi doesn't jibe with the testimony of eye-witnesses
jibe
To change tacks by swinging the stern through the wind, and/or to swing a fore and aft sail to swing from one side to the other
jibe
If numbers, statements, or events jibe, they are exactly the same as each other or they are consistent with each other. The numbers don't jibe How did your expectations jibe with the reality? = tally. The act of jibing. To be in accord; agree: Your figures jibe with mine. Variant of gibe. an unkind remark intended to make someone seem silly (JIBE2)
jibe
shift from one side of the ship to the other; "The sail jibbed wildly
jibe
To agree
gybe
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