floater

listen to the pronunciation of floater
Englisch - Englisch
Agent noun of float; one who floats
An "extra" male at a dinner party, or a young friend of the hostess, whose assignment is to entertain the female guests
A piece of faeces that floats

2004: He left a floater in the toilet. — poetry critical workshop.

An employee of a company who does not have fixed tasks to do but fills in wherever needed, usually when someone else is away
Someone who attaches themselves to a group of people, much to the dismay of that group, and repeatedly shows up to participate in group activities despite attempts to get rid of, or “flush,” that person
A maneuver in which a surfer transitions above the unbroken face of the wave onto the lip, or on top of the breaking section of the wave
An unaffiliated player
A policy covering property at more than one location or which may be in transit
A coin which does not spin when thrown in the air

1998: In this section floater means a spin in which at least 1 of the coins does not turn over in the air at least once. — Queensland government Casino Gaming Amendment Rule (No. 2) 1998.

A floating corpse picked up from a body of water
A threadlike speck in the visual field that seems to move, possibly caused by degeneration of the vitreous humour
An inland marine form covering movable property wherever located within territorial limits
n a serve that moves in an unpredictable path due to lack of spin 不带旋转的飘球。
Anything that floats
Floating rate bond
an insurance policy covering loss of movable property e
A bond whose interest rate varies with the interest rate of another debt instrument, e g , a bond that has the interest rate of the Treasury bill + 25%
A person who votes illegally in various polling places or election districts, either under false registration made by himself or under the name of some properly registered person who has not already voted
An insurance policy, separate from the basic homeowners or renters policy, which covers specific items of personal property The coverage "floats" with the property-that is, applies to the property wherever it is located, within the limits stated in the contract
A person, as a delegate to a convention or a member of a legislature, who represents an irregular constituency, as one formed by a union of the voters of two counties neither of which has a number sufficient to be allowed a (or an extra) representative of its own
Coverage for property which moves from location to location If the floater covers "scheduled" property, coverage is listed separately for each item If the floater covers "unscheduled" property, all property is covered for the same limits of insurance
A ball that goes where the lane lets it; the ball is released badly with no particular lift or turn
These are black or opaque objects that float across the line of vision People describe them as spiders, flies, hairs or nets They change position with eye movements, and are seen most clearly against a white or bright background
A ball that has little or no lift or turn, which therefore follows the path of least resistance down the lane
an insurance policy covering loss of movable property (e g jewelry) regardless of its location
an object that floats or is capable of floating
a debt instrument with a variable interest rate tied to some other interest rate (e g the rate paid by T-bills)
Inland Marine A form of insurance that applies to movable property, whatever its location, if it is within the territorial limits imposed by the contract   The coverage "floats" with the property
a moving spot that appears in the field of vision Floaters may be an early sign of an eye disorder such as CMV retinitis
A high pass usually associated with indoors that has little use other than hang in the air a long time and confuse everyone on the field - usually ending in a pile up of players Also know as Hospital Pass or Toss Pass
one whose vote is purchasable
An insurance policy that covers specific items of personal property, such as jewelry BACK TO TOP
a swimmer who floats in the water
Skydivers who leave the airplane before the base are called floaters since they must use a slow fall rate to get up to the base Floating also refers to an exit position outside the airplane
an employee who is reassigned from job to job as needed
spots before the eyes caused by opaque cell fragments in the vitreous humor and lens
A floater is a type of insurance that covers movable property - - like jewelry, for example - - wherever it is, within limits stated in the contract The coverage "floats" with the property
A type of insurance coverage on moveable possessions like art, jewelry and furs that protects against loss of property, regardless of where the object is lost, stolen or damaged
A type of bond in which the bond's interest rate varies with the interest rate of another debt instrument e g a bond that has the interest rate of the Treasury bill + 25%
Someone who attaches themselves to a group of people, much to the dismay of that group, and repeatedly shows up to participate in group activities despite attempts to get rid of or "flush," that person
A float for indicating the height of a liquid surface
Additional coverage for personal property such as jewelry, artwork, or antiques not otherwise included in the homeowners policy, or included for a nominal coverage amount The coverage "floats" or moves with the property Also called "Scheduled Personal Property Endorsement "
A jumper positioned outside the aircraft to leave slightly prior to the person or group designated as the target for the initial freefall formation (see also BASE) A floater maneuvers from a position below the base relative to the horizon
jewelry) regardless of its location an object that floats or is capable of floating a swimmer who floats in the water a voter who votes illegally at different polling places in the same election an employee who is reassigned from job to job as needed a debt instrument with a variable interest rate tied to some other interest rate (e
a security with a variable interest rate
A meat pie sitting in a pool of gravy or soupy peas
One who floats or swims
a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
a voter who votes illegally at different polling places in the same election
{i} person or thing that floats; wanderer; one whose vote can be bought; one who does not belong to a particular political party
A floating rate instrument that pays interest at a rate that adjusts periodically, relative to a spread over a specific benchmark or index
A colloquial term for a security with a floating or variable interest rate See: FLOATING RATE
the rate paid by T-bills
n a serve that moves in an unpredictable path due to lack of spin
A voter who shifts from party to party, esp
ark-floater
an aged actor
pie floater
A meat pie served floating in a bowl of thick green pea soup
floaters
Muscae volitantes Small clumps of tissue or other debris floating in the vitreous May appear as small specks, dots or cobwebs in the line of sight
floaters
Throw ups done on subway car panels at window level
floaters
small clumps of cells or gel in the vitreous that appear as specks or clouds moving within the field of vision These clumps or strands are caused by a thickening or shrinking of the vitreous gel within the eye which then pulls away from the back surface of the eye (posterior vitreous detachment)
floaters
small clumps of gel or cellular debris in the vitreous fluid For more information, read "Floaters and Flashers" in the MD Support Library
floaters
dark specks, clouds, threads or webs appear to move or float through your vision These are generally pieces of the vitreous gel material or other debris floating within the eye, and are normally considered harmless
floaters
One or more obstructions that float around with eye motion, occasionally interfering with vision See the Flashes and Floaters FAQ
floaters
muscae volitantes; bits of optical debris (such as dead cells or fibrils), usually in the vitreous humor, that may be perceived as spots before the eyes
floaters
Sometimes leading to retinal detachment, these are commonly reported as spots floating in front of the eyes
floaters
— Tiny spots or specks that float across the field of vision While floaters are usually harmless, they can be a warning of certain eye problems - especially if there is a sudden change
floaters
Newfoundland fishermen who prosecute the cod-fishery in schooners along the Labrador coast
floaters
Particles that float in the vitreous, which is jelly-like substance that fills center cavity of eye, and cast shadows on the retina The particles appear to be strung together with a web-like thread Some floaters are formed before birth while others occur normally with aging The sudden appearance of many floaters can be an indication of a serious eye disorder and should be checked by an eye care professional See Free Eye Tests
floaters
Small specks that pass across your field of vision, these are clumps of cells inside the transparent gel filling the eyeball in front of the retina
floaters
Small semi-transparent or cloudy particles floating in the vitreous, the transparent, colorless mass of gel that lies behind the lens and in front of the retina
floaters
A debt instrument with a variable interest rate tied to another interest rate
floaters
Drifting dark spots within the field of vision Floaters can be caused by CMV retinitis, but also can appear in persons as a normal part of the aging process
floaters
Cells and fragments of debris in the eye that pass across your field of vision
floaters
plural of floater
floaters
Floaters refer to those specks of fluff that pass through your line of sight They are most apparent when looking at a plain background such as a blank wall or blue sky They can be seen because they create shadows on the retina, the light sensitive film at the back of the eye
floater
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