coppice

listen to the pronunciation of coppice
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To manage a wooded area sustainably, as a coppice

Her plan to coppice the woods should keep her self-sufficient in fuel indefinitely.

A grove of small growth; a thicket of brushwood; a wood cut at certain times for fuel or other purposes, typically managed to promote growth and ensure a reliable supply of timber. See copse

It was also enacted that all coppices or underwoods should be enclosed for periods of from four to seven years after felling.

{n} a wood of small or low trees
To coppice trees or bushes means to cut off parts of them, in order to make them look more attractive or to make it easier to obtain wood from them. It is best to coppice the trees in the winter before the sap rises. extensive oak woods with coppiced hazel and sweet chestnut. areas where coppicing of hawthorn and hazel occurs. a copse. to cut a tree down so that useful new wood will grow from the bottom
a dense growth of bushes
The tendency of certain tree and brush species (such as red alder and bigleaf maple) to produce a large number of shoots when a single or few stems are mechanically removed but the root system is left intact
A coppice is a small group of trees growing very close to each other. coppices of willow. = copse
(1)Tree sprouts; (2) a forest grown wholly or predominantly from sprouts from harvested trees
A grove of small growth; a thicket of brushwood; a wood cut at certain times for fuel or other purposes
To cause to grow in the form of a coppice; to cut back (as young timber) so as to produce shoots from stools or roots
A traditional method of woodland management in which multiple stems are allowed to grow up from the base of a felled tree The stems are then cut every few years In the past this would have provided fuel and wood for making tool handles fencing and charcoal
the tendency of certain tree and brush species to produce a large number of shoots when a single or few stems are mechanically removed but the root system left intact
the tendency of certain tree and brush species (such as aspen) to produce a large number of shoots when a single or few stems are disturbed
Coppice is a traditional management technique utilising the re-growth from the cut stumps (stools) of certain broadleaved trees As a system of woodland management this involves the repeated cutting on a short rotation basis of between 5 and 20 years, the length of rotation being determined by the end product The technique may yield an abundance of straight poles, bumper harvests of fruit or nuts or simply large quantities of fire wood for charcoal production, cooking, heating or woodcrafts
{i} grove; copse, thicket of bushes or small trees
woodland where coppicing takes place
In silviculture, a tree cutting method in which renewal of a newly cutover area depends primarily on vegetative reproduction like sprouting
To regrow wholly or mainly from sprouts
A forest originating mainly from shoots or root suckers rather than seed (French, couper, to cut)
coppiced
past of coppice
coppiced
ceduo
coppices
plural of coppice
coppicing
present participle of coppice
coppicing
Cutting or pruning trees & shrubs to ground level to produce new, vigorous growth
coppicing
A form of woodland management where trees (e g hazel) are cut regularly on a cycle to promote growth from their bases Products that may be harvested from a coppice include wooden poles or materials for hurdle or fence making
coppicing
to strike
coppice

    Silbentrennung

    cop·pice

    Synonyme

    copse

    Aussprache

    Etymologie

    [ 'kä-p&s ] (noun.) 1534. From Old French coupeiz (“a cut-over forest”), from presumed Late Latin colpaticium (“having the quality of being cut”), from *colpare (“to cut, strike”), from Medieval Latin colpus (“a blow”), from Vulgar Latin colapus, from Latin colaphus (“a cuff, box on the ear”), from Ancient Greek (kolaphos). * In 1578, the contracted form copse arose, meaning "small wood grown for purposes of periodic cutting"

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