coulomb

listen to the pronunciation of coulomb
İngilizce - İngilizce
In the International System of Units, the derived unit of electric charge; the amount of electric charge carried by a current of 1 ampere flowing for 1 second. Symbol: C

He is charged up with enough coulombs to make his hair stand on end.

Coulomb's law Coulomb Charles Augustin de Coulomb force
A coulomb is the standard unit of electric charge 1 coulomb is the charge delivered by a current of 1 ampere flowing for 1 second
{i} unit for measuring an electric charge (Electricity)
The Coulomb is the unit normally used to measure large charges 1 Coulomb = the amount of electricity passing a given point in 1 second at a current of 1 Ampere
In the International System of Units, the derived unit of electric charge; the amount of electric charge carried by a current of 1 ampere flowing for 1 second. Symbol
the practical unit of electric charge transmitted by a current of one ampere for one second It is the charge carried by 6 2418 x 1018 electrons Named for the French physicist Charles A de Coulomb 1806
The quantity of electricity that is transmitted through an electric circuit in an 1 second when the current in an the circuit is 1 amp The quantity of electricity that will deposit 0 0011180 g of silver
A unit of electric charge defined as the amount of charge that crosses a surface in 1 second when a current of 1 absolute ampere is flowing across the surface See international coulomb
A standard unit of electricity used to measure the amount of charge Specifically, 1 coulomb equals 6 28 x 1018 electrons One coulomb is the quantity of electricity transferred by 1 ampere in one second
The quantity of electricity transferred by an electric current of one ampere in one second
French physicist famous for his discoveries in the field of electricity and magnetism; formulated Coulomb's Law (1736-1806) a unit of electrical charge equal to the amount of charge transferred by a current of 1 ampere in 1 second
6 25 (10)^18 electrons per second
It is the quantity of electricity conveyed in one second by the current produced by an electro-motive force of one volt acting in a circuit having a resistance of one ohm, or the quantity transferred by one ampère in one second
(C) Unit of charge equal to 6 28x1018 electrons 1C = 0 2778mAh Not capitalized unless abbreviated
A measurement of the quantity of electrical charge, usually expressed as pico coulomb (10-12 coulombs)
Formerly called weber
The quantity of electricity when one ampere flows for one second, representing 6 24 x 1018 electrons See also Current, Faraday
French physicist famous for his discoveries in the field of electricity and magnetism; formulated Coulomb's Law (1736-1806)
a measure of the quantity of electricity One coulomb equals 6 242 x 1,018 electrons
The unit of measurement for electric charge; 1 coul is equivalent to the charge of 6 25 X 1018 electrons
The standard unit of quantity in electrical measurements
(coul or C): unit of electric charge The absolute coulomb is the amount of charge transferred in 1 second by a current of 1 ampere; i e , it is 1 ampere-second
The S1 unit of electric charge , equal to the quantity of electricity conveyed in one second by a current of one ampere
Unit of electrical charge in the practical system of units A quantity of electricity transferred by a current of one ampere in one second
A unit of electric charge The amount of charge conveyed in one second by one ampere
A unit of electrical charge equal to 6 25 x 1018 electrons passing a point in one second
Measurement unit of the electrical charge Symbol: "C"
Unit of electrical charge Charge caused by flow of one ampere for one second
a unit of electrical charge equal to the amount of charge transferred by a current of 1 ampere in 1 second
The amount of electricity transported by a current of one ampere flowing for one second
One coulomb is the amount of charge accumulated in one second by a current of one ampere Electricity is actually a flow of particles called electrons, and one coulomb represents the charge on approximately 6 241 506 x 1018 electrons The coulomb is named for a French physicist, Charles-Augustin de Coulomb (1736-1806), who was the first to measure accurately the forces exerted between electric charges
The quantity of electricity equal to the charge on 6 25 x 1018 electrons
the quantity of electricity transferred by a current of one amp in one second
The SI unit of electrical charge, defined as the charge transported in one second by an electric current of one ampere Symbol: C
Coulomb attraction
the attraction between opposite charges due to Coulomb force
Coulomb barrier
the barrier between two atomic nuclei, due to Coulomb repulsion, that has to be overcome for nuclear fusion to proceed
Coulomb barriers
plural form of Coulomb barrier
Coulomb blockade
the increased resistance observed at low temperatures in some semiconductor devices
Coulomb blockades
plural form of Coulomb blockade
Coulomb collision
the interaction between two moving electric charges at close range
Coulomb energies
plural form of Coulomb energy
Coulomb energy
The energy associated with the electrostatic forces of a system of particles, especially with that of the electrons of a covalent bond
Coulomb explosion
the effect of a molecule moving at high speed striking a solid; binding electrons being torn off, and the resulting charged constituents separating due to Coulomb repulsion
Coulomb explosions
plural form of Coulomb explosion
Coulomb force
the electrostatic force between two charges, as described by Coulomb's law
Coulomb gauge
a mathematical construct used in the theory of electromagnetic radiation
Coulomb repulsion
the repulsive force between two positive, or two negative charges; as described by Coulomb's law
Coulomb's constant
the constant of proportionality in the equation of Coulomb's law; numerical value depends on the units used
Coulomb's law
the fundamental law of electrostatics - the force between two point charges is proportional to the product of their charges, and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them
Coulomb force
An attractive or repulsive electrostatic force described by Coulomb's law
Coulomb's law
Law formulated by C.-A. de Coulomb that describes the electric force between charged objects. It states that (1) like charges repel each other and unlike charges attract each other, (2) the attraction or repulsion acts along the line between the two charges, (3) the size of the force varies inversely as the square of the distance between the two charges, and (4) the size of the force is proportional to the value of each charge
coulomb meter
Any instrument by which electricity can be measured in coulombs
coulomb's law
a fundamental principle of electrostatics; the force of attraction or repulsion between two charged particles is directly proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the distance between them; principle also holds for magnetic poles
Charles-Augustin de Coulomb
born June 14, 1736, Angoulême, France died Aug. 23, 1806, Paris French physicist. After serving as a military engineer in the West Indies, he returned to France in the 1780s to pursue scientific research. To investigate Joseph Priestley's law of electrical repulsions, he invented a sensitive instrument to measure the electrical forces involved. A light rod made of an insulator, with a small conducting sphere at each end, was suspended horizontally by a fine wire so that it was free to twist when another charged sphere was brought close to it. By measuring the angle through which the rod twisted, Coulomb could measure the repulsive forces. He is best known for formulating Coulomb's law. He also did research on friction of machinery, on windmills, and on the elasticity of metal and silk fibres. The coulomb, a unit of electric charge, was named in his honour
coulombic
electric
coulombs
plural of coulomb
Türkçe - İngilizce
(Çevre) coulomb
coulomb kanunu
(Elektrik, Elektronik,Teknik) coulomb's law
coulomb engeli
coulomb barrier
coulomb sonumu
(Havacılık) coulomb damping
coulomb

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    cou·lomb

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    Etimoloji

    [ 'kü-"läm, -"lOm ] (noun.) 1881. Named after the French physicist Charles-Augustin de Coulomb.

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