cooper

listen to the pronunciation of cooper
İngilizce - Türkçe
varil
fıçıcı
{i} şarap satıcısı
{i} şarapçı
fıçılamak
fıçı yapmak
fıçı imalâthanesi
cooperage fıçıcılık
fıçı onarmak
cooper creek
bakır dere
Cooper, A. P
(Anatomi) (1768-1841) İngiliz hekimi örn: Cooper fasiası; fascia cremasterica
cooper disease
(Tıp) cooper hastalığı
cooper hernia
(Tıp) cooper fıtığı
cooper irritabl testicule
(Tıp) cooper iritabl testikülü
cooper loading
katar yükü
cooper serum
(Tıp) cooper serumu
cooper tendon
(Tıp) cooper tendonu
cooper's adze
aydemir
cooper’s ligament
(Tıp) cooper ligamenti
family name
soyadı

Herhangi biri Tom'un soyadını biliyor mu? - Does anyone know Tom's family name?

Çin'de önce soyadımızı sonra adımızı koyarız. - In China, we put our family name first, then our name.

family name
aile adı

Tom mahkum edilmişse aile adımız mahvolacak. - Our family name will be ruined if Tom is convicted.

Aile adınızın yazılımı nasıl? - What's the spelling of your family name?

İngilizce - İngilizce
An English occupational surname derived from cooper
A male given name, transferred from the surname
A craftsman who makes and repairs barrels and similar wooden vessels such as casks, buckets and tubs
To make and repair barrels etc
{n} a maker of barrels
{i} family name
transferred use of the surname
makes and repairs barrels and casks
A distillery worker who is responsible for the assembly and maintenance of the casks In the nineteenth century, probably the highest-paid man at the distillery
United States film actor noted for his portrayals of strong silent heroes (1901-1961)
{i} one who makes and repairs wooden barrels
United States industrialist who built the first American locomotive; founded Cooper Union in New York city to offer free courses in the arts and sciences (1791-1883)
One who makes barrels, hogsheads, casks, etc
To do the work of a cooper upon; as, to cooper a cask or barrel
United States novelist noted for his stories of indians and the frontier life (1789-1851)
a person who made kettles
A cooper is a person who makes barrels. American novelist who is best remembered for his novels of frontier life, such as The Last of the Mohicans (1826). American manufacturer, inventor, and philanthropist who built the first American locomotive and founded Cooper Union (1859) in New York City, which offered free courses in the arts and sciences. someone who makes barrels (cuper, from cupe; COOP). Cooper Creek Cooper Alfred Duff 1st Viscount Norwich of Aldwick Cooper Dame Gladys Cooper Gary Frank James Cooper Cooper James Fenimore Cooper Leon Neil Cooper Peter Procter William Cooper Shaftesbury Anthony Ashley Cooper 1st earl of Shaftesbury Anthony Ashley Cooper 3rd earl of Shaftesbury Anthony Ashley Cooper 7th earl of
a craftsman who makes or repairs wooden barrels or tubs
a craftsman who makes or repairs wooden barrels or tubs United States novelist noted for his stories of indians and the frontier life (1789-1851) United States film actor noted for his portrayals of strong silent heroes (1901-1961) United States industrialist who built the first American locomotive; founded Cooper Union in New York city to offer free courses in the arts and sciences (1791-1883) make barrels and casks
make barrels and casks
Cooper pair
a pair of electrons, of opposite spin, that are thought to be the basis of superconductivity according to BCS theory
Cooper test
A test of physical fitness in the US military
Cooper's hawk
A medium-sized hawk found from Canada to northern Mexico
Cooper's hawks
plural form of Cooper's hawk
Cooper Creek
or Barcoo River Intermittent stream, east-central Australia. Rising as the Barcoo on the northern slopes of the Warrego Range in Queensland, it is joined by the Alice River, turns southwest, and receives its principal tributary, the Thomson, from which point it is known as Cooper Creek. Crossing the South Australia border, it carries water to Lake Eyre. Its total length is 880 mi (1,420 km)
Cooper Industries
American corporation headquartered in Texas, manufacturer of tools hardware and electrical products
cooper union
university founded in 1859 by Peter Cooper to offer free courses in the arts and sciences
cooper's hawk
bluish-gray North American hawk having a darting flight
Mini Cooper
A Mini motor car fitted with a high-powered engine and disc brakes
coopers
Third-person singular simple present indicative form of cooper
coopers
plural form of cooper
wine cooper
a person who samples, bottles and sells wine
Alfred Duff 1st Viscount Norwich of Aldwick Cooper
born Feb. 22, 1890 died Jan. 1, 1954 British politician. He served as a Conservative in Parliament (1924-29 and 1931-45). After a stint as secretary of state for war (1935-37), he became first lord of the Admiralty (1937) but resigned to protest the Munich agreement. Later he served as minister of information under Winston Churchill (1940-41) and as ambassador to France (1944-47). His books include Talleyrand, Haig, and his autobiography, Old Men Forget
Anthony Ashley Cooper 1st earl of Shaftesbury
born July 22, 1621, Wimborne St. Giles, Dorset, Eng. died Jan. 21, 1683, Amsterdam, Neth. English politician. He served in the English Civil Wars, fighting first for the king (1643) and then for Parliament (1644). He was appointed by Oliver Cromwell to the council of state (1653-54, 1659) and also served in Parliament (1654-60). One of 12 commissioners sent to invite Charles II to return to England, he was appointed to Charles's privy council (1660) and served as chancellor of the Exchequer (1661-72) and lord chancellor (1672-73). As head of the Council of Trade and Foreign Plantations (1672-74), he drew up a constitution for the North American province of Carolina, aided by his protégé John Locke. Dismissed by Charles for supporting the anti-Catholic Test Act and opposing the marriage of Charles's brother James (later James II) to another Catholic, Shaftesbury became a leader of the Whig opposition. He exploited the political chaos caused by Titus Oates to consolidate his parliamentary power and tried unsuccessfully to pass the Exclusion Bill, to keep James from the throne. In 1681 Charles dissolved the Parliament; Shaftesbury was arrested and tried for treason but was acquitted. In 1682 he fled to Holland, where he died
Anthony Ashley Cooper 3rd earl of Shaftesbury
born Feb. 26, 1671, London, Eng. died Feb. 15, 1713, Naples English politician and philosopher. Grandson of the 1st earl of Shaftesbury, he received his early education from John Locke. He entered Parliament in 1695; succeeding to his title in 1699, he served three years in the House of Lords. His numerous philosophical essays were influenced by Neoplatonism; published as Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times (1711), they became the chief source of English Deism and influenced writers such as Alexander Pope, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Immanuel Kant
Anthony Ashley Cooper 7th earl of Shaftesbury
born April 28, 1801, London, Eng. died Oct. 1, 1885, Folkestone, Kent English politician and social reformer. When his father succeeded to the earldom in 1811, Cooper became Lord Ashley. As a member of Parliament (1826-51), he opposed the Reform Bill of 1832 but supported Catholic emancipation and repeal of the Corn Laws. From 1833 he led the factory reform movement in Parliament and effected passage of the Mines Act (1842) and the Ten Hours Act (1847), known as Lord Ashley's Act, which shortened the working day in textile mills. As president of the Ragged Schools Union (1843-83), he promoted the free education of destitute children. Succeeding to his father's title in 1851, he continued his work as one of the most effective social reformers of 19th-century England. He also led the Evangelical movement within the Church of England and financially supported several missionary societies
Dame Gladys Cooper
born Dec. 18, 1888, Lewisham, London, Eng. died Nov. 17, 1971, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire British actress. After her London debut in 1906, she performed in musicals and dramas, including The Importance of Being Earnest (1911). She was comanager of London's Playhouse Theatre (1917-27) and then its sole manager (1927-33). Her appearance in The Second Mrs. Tanqueray (1922) made her a star. She made her U.S. stage debut in The Shining Hour (1934) and later acted in Relative Values (1951) and The Chalk Garden (1955). She personified British poise in U.S. films such as Now, Voyager (1942) and Separate Tables (1958)
Gary Cooper
{i} (1901-1961) American movie star
Gary Cooper
orig. Frank James Cooper born May 7, 1901, Helena, Mont., U.S. died May 13, 1961, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. film actor. He moved to Hollywood in 1924 and played minor roles in low-budget westerns before becoming a star with The Virginian (1929). Lanky and handsome, he played the strong, soft-spoken man of action in films such as A Farewell to Arms (1932), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Beau Geste (1939), Meet John Doe (1941), Sergeant York (1941, Academy Award), and The Fountainhead (1949). His performance in High Noon (1952, Academy Award) is considered his finest. His later films include Friendly Persuasion (1956) and Love in the Afternoon (1957)
James Fenimore Cooper
a US writer who wrote novels about Native Americans and life on the American frontier, including The Deerslayer and The Last of the Mohicans (1789-1851). born Sept. 15, 1789, Burlington, N.J., U.S. died Sept. 14, 1851, Cooperstown, N.Y. The first major U.S. novelist. Cooper grew up in a prosperous family in the settlement of Cooperstown, founded by his father. The Spy (1821), set during the American Revolution, brought him fame. His best-known novels, the series The Leatherstocking Tales, feature the frontier adventures of the wilderness scout Natty Bumppo and include The Pioneers (1823), The Last of the Mohicans (1826), The Prairie (1827), The Pathfinder (1840), and The Deerslayer (1841). He also wrote popular sea novels, notably The Pilot (1823), and a history of the U.S. Navy (1839). Though internationally celebrated, he was troubled by lawsuits and political conflicts in his later years, and his popularity and income declined
Leon N Cooper
born Feb. 28, 1930, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. physicist. He taught at Ohio State University (1954-58) and Brown University (from 1958). For his role in developing the BCS theory of superconductivity, he shared the 1972 Nobel Prize for Physics with John Bardeen and J. Robert Schrieffer (b. 1931). His principal contribution to the theory was his discovery of Cooper electron pairs (1956), electrons that repel each other under normal conditions but are attracted to each other in superconductors
Leon Neil Cooper
born Feb. 28, 1930, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. physicist. He taught at Ohio State University (1954-58) and Brown University (from 1958). For his role in developing the BCS theory of superconductivity, he shared the 1972 Nobel Prize for Physics with John Bardeen and J. Robert Schrieffer (b. 1931). His principal contribution to the theory was his discovery of Cooper electron pairs (1956), electrons that repel each other under normal conditions but are attracted to each other in superconductors
Peter Cooper
born Feb. 12, 1791, New York, N.Y., U.S. died April 4, 1883, New York City U.S. inventor. Cooper became involved with the Canton Iron Works, built to supply the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Co., for which he devised and built the diminutive but powerful Tom Thumb locomotive. His factory at Trenton, N.J., produced the first structural-iron beams for buildings. He supported the Atlantic-cable project of Cyrus Field (1819-92) and became president of the North American Telegraph Co. His inventions include a washing machine, a compressed-air engine for ferry boats, and a waterpower device for moving canal barges. A social idealist and reformer, he founded the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 1859
William Cooper Procter
born Aug. 25, 1862, Glendale, near Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. died May 2, 1934, Cincinnati U.S. manufacturer. A grandson of the founder of Procter & Gamble Co., he started working at the company in 1883. He served as president from 1907 to 1930, during which time sales rose from $20 million to over $200 million. Under his leadership the company pioneered in labour relations: he introduced a profit-sharing plan for employees (1887), guaranteed them 48 weeks of work a year (1920), and introduced a disability pension plan, a life-insurance plan, and employee representation on the board of directors
a cooper
cowper
coopered
obsolete, past of cooper
coopering
Work done by a cooper in making or repairing barrels, casks, etc
coopering
obsolete, present participle of cooper
coopering
the business of a cooper
coopers
obsolete, plural of cooper
coopers
obsolete, third-person singular of cooper
Türkçe - İngilizce
cooper

    Heceleme

    coop·er

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    kupır

    Telaffuz

    /ˈko͞opər/ /ˈkuːpɜr/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'kü-p&r, 'ku- ] (noun.) 14th century. Middle English couper, cowper, from Middle Dutch cuper or Middle Low German kuper, from kupe cask; Middle Dutch cupe and Middle Low German kupe, from Latin cupa; akin to Greek kypellon cup; more at HIVE.

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