violet

listen to the pronunciation of violet
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} menekşe

Menekşeler benim mutfak pencerelerini süslüyor. - The violets adorn my kitchen windows.

O, menekşe gözlü kadınlardan hoşlanıyor. - He likes women with violet eyes.

güvez
(Kimya) koyumor
eflatun

Eflatun rengini severim. - I like the color violet.

menekşe rengi

Menekşe menekşe rengidir. - The violet is violet.

(Tıp) menekşe rengi, mor boya
{i} utangaç kimse
{i} mahçup kimse
gökkuşağındaki en kısa ışınlar
mor renk/menekşe
menekşe renginde
shrinking violet utangaç kimse
{s} menekşe renkli
{i} (Botanik) menekşe
Viola odorata
violet rays mor ışınlar
(Tıp) Bir spektromda en çok kırılmaya uğrayan uçtaki renk
{s} mor

O, mor gözlü kadınlardan hoşlanıyor. - He likes women with violet eyes.

Gökkuşağının görünür renkleri kırmızı, turuncu, sarı, yeşil, mavi, çivit ve mordur. - The visible colors of the rainbow are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet.

shrinking violet
(deyim) utangaç çekingen tip
african violet
afrika menekşesi
gentian violet stain
jansiyen moru
candied violet
(Gıda) Şekerle kaplanmış menekşe çiçeği

I ate a candied violet yesterday in Genoa.

dogtooth violet
dogtooth menekşe
gentian violet
centiyana menekşe
ultra violet
ultraviyole
dog violet
(isim) yaban menekşesi
dog violet
{i} yaban menekşesi
ultra-violet radiation
ultraviyole ışıma
ultra-violet radiation
morötesi ışıma
İngilizce - İngilizce
A female given name from the English noun violet
A bluish-purple colour

web violet colour:.

A fragrant plant genus with white, purple or yellow flowers
Having a bluish-purple colour
{n} a sweet-smelling flower
from the English noun violet
Something that is violet is a bluish-purple colour. The light was beginning to drain from a violet sky
A violet is a small plant that has purple or white flowers in the spring
Keep a payphone from hanging up
any of numerous low-growing small-flowered violas
The violets are generally low, herbaceous plants, and the flowers of many of the species are blue, while others are white or yellow, or of several colors, as the pansy (Viola tricolor)
said to have sprung from the blood of Ajax; but how the blood of the mad boaster could produce this modest flower is past understanding (Latin, viola; Greek, ) “As when stern Ajax poured a purple flood, The violet rose, fair daughter of his blood ” Dr Young: The Instalment Chemical test paper is steeped in syrup of violets; used to detect acids and alkalis If an acid is present, it will change the violet paper into red, an alkali will turn the paper green Slips of white paper stained with the juice of violets (kept from the air) will serve the same purpose Litmus and turmeric are also used for similar purposes The paper should be unsized
Any one of numerous species of small violet-colored butterflies belonging to Lycæna, or Rusticus, and allied genera
Master Saint Germain The Color of Mastery Used to cleanse, purify, and to transmute negative energies Color of success and freedom, mercy, protection, compassion, and ceremonial magic Violet can be used for good only, due to its high vibratory rate Archangel Zadkiel and Archiea Holy Amethyst
The color of a violet, or that part of the spectrum farthest from red
parma violet
of a color midway between red and blue
If you say that someone is no shrinking violet, you mean that they are not at all shy. When it comes to expressing himself he is no shrinking violet. Any of the approximately 500 species of herbaceous plants or low shrubs that make up the genus Viola, which includes the small, solid-coloured violets and the larger-flowered, often multicoloured violas and pansies. Many Viola species have two types of flowers: the showy spring flower is infertile; the less conspicuous summer flower is self-fertilizing. The best-known species of Viola have heart-shaped leaves. The popular florist's violets, consisting of several hybrids (many of them V. odorata), are usually called sweet violets. The family Violaceae, to which Viola belongs, has members worldwide; they are typically small trees and shrubs that grow as low vegetation beneath the taller trees of forests. The so-called African violet belongs to the gesneriad family. See also dogtooth violet. African violet dogtooth violet Price Mary Violet Leontyne Robinson Joan Violet Joan Violet Maurice Edith Anna Oenone Somerville and Violet Florence Martin
Any plant or flower of the genus Viola, of many species
a variable color that lies beyond blue in the spectrum any of numerous low-growing small-flowered violas
Dark blue, inclining to red; bluish purple; having a color produced by red and blue combined
{s} having a purple color; resembling a violet
In art, a color produced by a combination of red and blue in equal proportions; a bluish purple color
{i} purple color; any of a number of herbaceous plants that usually have irregular purple flowers (but occasionally have white, blue, or yellow flowers)
a variable color that lies beyond blue in the spectrum
It is the most refrangible part of the spectrum
violet noise
A signal or process with a frequency spectrum such that the spectral energy density is proportional to the frequency squared
violet phosphorus
alternative name for black phosphorus
violet red
Of a deep purplish pink colour, like that of some violets
violet red
A deep purplish pink colour, like that of some violets

violet red colour:.

violet red bile agar
A mixture of agar with peptone, yeast extract, bile salts and crystal violet; it is used for enumerating coliform bacteria in dairy products
violet reds
plural form of violet red
violet wand
A device used for the application of low-current, high-voltage electricity to the body using an Oudin coil, originally claimed to have medical benefits and more recently used in sadomasochistic sex play

I've been told repeatedly that electricity above the waist is dangerous, but I've seen guys using violet wands on other guys' chests.

violet suksdorfia
slender delicate plant with wide roundish deeply lobed leaves and deep pink to violet funnel-shaped flowers; British Columbia to northern Oregon and west to Idaho and Montana
violet wood sorrel
perennial herb of eastern North America with palmately compound leaves and usually rose-purple flowers
violet-flowered petunia
herb or small shrublet having solitary violet to rose-red flowers
African violet
A perennial plant of the genus Saintpaulia with fine haired round leaves and velvety petals
blue violet
Of a bluish violet colour
blue violet
A bluish violet colour

blue violet colour:.

crystal violet
A dye, derived from gentian violet, that is used as an acid-base indicator and as a biological stain
gentian violet
Having a violet colour similar to the gentian flower
gentian violet
A violet colour similar to the gentian flower
gentian violet
Also known as crystal violet, a chemical dye used in the Gram stain test, and is also a fungicide. Chemically: hexamethyl pararosaniline chloride, C25H30ClN3
red violet
A of a purplish red colour, like that of a red violet flower
red violet
A purplish red colour, like that of a red violet flower

red violet colour:.

shrinking violet
A very shy person, who avoids contact with others if avoidable
African violet
Any of various East African herbs of the genus Saintpaulia, having a basal leaf rosette and a showy cluster of violet or sometimes pink or white flowers. African violets are grown as indoor ornamentals. Any plant of the genus Saintpaulia, of the gesneriad family, especially S. ionantha. African violets are native to high elevations in tropical eastern Africa. They are small, hairy, usually stemless herbaceous plants with crowded, long-stalked leaves. The violet, white, or pink flowers bloom most of the year. They are popular houseplants, and hundreds of varieties have been developed, including half-sized miniatures
Joan Violet Maurice
orig. Joan (Violet) Maurice born Oct. 31, 1903, Camberley, Surrey, Eng. died Aug. 5, 1983, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire British economist. A professor at the University of Cambridge (1931-71), she helped develop Keynesian theory, establishing her reputation in 1933 with The Economics of Imperfect Competition, in which she analyzed distribution and allocation, dealing particularly with the concept of exploitation (see monopolistic competition). In the 1940s she began to incorporate aspects of Marxism into her work. Her unorthodox views and sympathy with noncapitalist systems including China's, on which she wrote three books involved her in controversy throughout her career
Joan Violet Robinson
v. orig. Joan (Violet) Maurice born Oct. 31, 1903, Camberley, Surrey, Eng. died Aug. 5, 1983, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire British economist. A professor at the University of Cambridge (1931-71), she helped develop Keynesian theory, establishing her reputation in 1933 with The Economics of Imperfect Competition, in which she analyzed distribution and allocation, dealing particularly with the concept of exploitation (see monopolistic competition). In the 1940s she began to incorporate aspects of Marxism into her work. Her unorthodox views and sympathy with noncapitalist systems including China's, on which she wrote three books involved her in controversy throughout her career
Mary Violet Leontyne Price
v. born Feb. 10, 1927, Laurel, Miss., U.S. U.S. soprano. She was trained at the Juilliard School. After her debut in a revival of Four Saints in Three Acts in 1952, she made her name in the international tour of Porgy and Bess (1953-55). She sang in Aïda at Milan's La Scala in 1960 and made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1961. Price was one of the Met's most popular stars for more than two decades and was the first African American singer to achieve an international reputation in opera. She gave her farewell performance of Aïda at the Met in 1985 but continued to give recitals
african violet
tropical African plant cultivated as a houseplant for its violet or white or pink flowers
american dog violet
violet of eastern North America having pale violet to white flowers
bird's-foot violet
common violet of the eastern United States with large pale blue or purple flowers resembling pansies
bush violet
any of several herbs of the genus Browallia cultivated for their blue or violet or white flowers
canada violet
tall North American perennial with heart-shaped leaves and purple-streaked white flowers
crystal violet
gentian violet: a green crystal (violet in water) used as a dye or stain or bactericide or fungicide or anthelmintic or burn treatment
crystal violet
A dye derived from gentian violet that is used as a general biological stain and an acid-base indicator
damask violet
long-cultivated herb having flowers whose scent is more pronounced in the evening; naturalized throughout Europe to Siberia and into North America
dog violet
{i} type ot violet having purple and yellow flowers
dog violet
Old World leafy-stemmed blue-flowered violet
dogtooth violet
Any of several plants of the genus Erythronium, having leaves with reddish blotches and nodding, colorful, solitary, lilylike flowers on leafless stems. Also called adder's-tongue, trout lily. Any of the approximately 20 species of spring-blooming plants that make up the genus Erythronium, in the lily family, all native to North America except for the purple-or pink-flowered dogtooth violet of Europe (E. dens-canis). The nodding flowers, usually one to a plant or in small clusters, range in colour from white to purple. The two leaves, borne at the base of the plant, often are covered with white or brown spots. The common dogtooth violet of North America, E. americanum, has yellow flowers and brown-mottled leaves. Several species are grown as rock-garden ornamentals
dogtooth violet
perennial woodland spring-flowering plant; widely cultivated
downy yellow violet
violet of eastern North America having softly pubescent leaves and stems and clear yellow flowers with brown-purple veins
gentian violet
a green crystal (violet in water) used as a dye or stain or bactericide or fungicide or anthelmintic or burn treatment
gentian violet
A dye used in microscopy as a biological stain and in medicine as a bactericide, fungicide, and anthelmintic
hedge violet
common European violet that grows in woods and hedgerows
horned violet
European viola with an unusually long corolla spur
long-spurred violet
violet of eastern North America having lilac-purple flowers with a long slender spur
pale violet
leafy-stemmed violet of eastern North America having large white or creamy flowers faintly marked with purple
persian violet
perennial cultivated especially as a houseplant for its fragrant bluish to dark lavender flowers
shrinking violet
someone who shrinks from familiarity with others
shrinking violet
someone who is very shy - used humorously
sweet violet
European violet typically having purple to white flowers; widely naturalized
sweet white violet
short-stemmed violet of eastern North America having fragrant purple-veined white flowers
two-eyed violet
violet of Pacific coast of North America having white petals tinged with yellow and deep violet
ultra violet
lying just beyond the violet end of the visible spectrum
violets
plural of violet
water violet
See under Violet
water violet
featherfoil of Europe and western Asia having submerged and floating leaves and violet flowers
white dogtooth violet
North American dogtooth having solitary white flowers with yellow centers and blue- or pink-tinted exteriors
violet

    Heceleme

    Vi·o·let

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    vaylît

    Telaffuz

    /ˈvīlət/ /ˈvaɪlɪt/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'vI-(&-)l&t ] (noun.) 14th century. Middle English, from Middle French violete, diminutive of viole violet, from Latin viola.

    Ortak Eşdizimliler

    violet hill

    Günün kelimesi

    gamboge