rococo

listen to the pronunciation of rococo
İngilizce - Türkçe
rokoko

Sanssouci Sarayı, rokoko tarzındadır. - The Sanssouci Palace is in the rococo style.

{s} çok süslü
{s} rokoko tarzında

Sanssouci Sarayı, rokoko tarzındadır. - The Sanssouci Palace is in the rococo style.

mimaride rokoko tarzı
(isim) rokoko tarzı (mimari)
rokoko tarzına ait
{i} rokoko tarzı (mimari)
çok suslü
çok süslü mimari tarzı
İngilizce - İngilizce
Of, or relating to the rococo style
Old-fashioned
Over-elaborate or complicated
A style of baroque architecture and decorative art, from 18th century France, having elaborate ornamentation
{s} of or pertaining to the Rococo style in art and music; excessively decorated, complex in an extreme manner
fanciful but graceful asymmetric ornamentation in art and architecture that originated in France in the 18th century
A florid style of ornamentation which prevailed in Europe in the latter part of the eighteenth century
Very elaborate European design style, originating in early 18th century France
A style of design, painting, and architecture dominating the 18th century, often considered the last stage of the Baroque Developing in the Paris townhouses of the French aristocracy at the turn of the 18th century, Rococo was elegant and ornately decorative, its mood lighthearted and witry Louis XV furniture, richly decorated with organic forms, is a typical product Leading exponents of the Rococo sryle included the French painter Antoine Watteau (1684-1721) and Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732-1806), and the German architect Johann Balthasar Neumann (1687-1753) Rococo gave way to Neo-classicism
a style of art beginning in France in the 18th century, characterized by delicately curving, light, and elaborate ornamentation
decorative style that evolved in the early 18th century partly as a reaction to the Baroque; featured asymmetrical ornament and flamboyant scrollwork See Style Guide
Rococo is a decorative style that was popular in Europe in the eighteenth century. Rococo buildings, furniture, and works of art often include complicated curly decoration. rococo buildings and furniture have a lot of curly decoration and were fashionable in Europe in the 18th century (rocaille , from roc )
A French style of interior decoration developed during the reign of Louis XV consisting mainly of asymmetrical arrangements of curves in paneling, porcelain, and gold and silver objects The characteristics of ornate curves, prettiness, and gaiety can also be found in the painting and sculpture of the period
> A reaction to the pompous heaviness of the Baroque period, this style is characterized by light airiness, elegance of design and delicate sense of intimate scale Asymmetrical treatment of S-scrolls and naturalistic elements such as shells and plants are typical The courts of Louis XV of France and the German princes were the leading proponents of this style from circa 1730-1765
An artistic style of the eighteenth century characterized by fanciful curved forms and elaborate ornamentation
a style of light, fluffy art in 18th-century France characterized by frivolous spatial forms, flowing lines, and ornament Rococo art is aristocratic, pleasure art: it is not deep, political, or critical of society
{i} 18th-century style of art and architecture characterized by the use of elaborate ornamentation
fanciful but graceful asymmetric ornamentation in art and architecture that originated in France in the 18th century having excessive asymmetrical ornamentation; "an exquisite gilded rococo mirror
- the last, less colorful but more figurative, phase of the Baroque period, from about 1735-1770; see periods
(1650 - 1790) Rococo (During the Enlightenment; 1715-1791) is a simpler style; a frame with some foliage and a few figures It was a style of art that flourished in western Europe from about 1700 to 1780 The term comes from a French word for a fanciful rock or shell design It implies a refined, elegant feeling and style
C'est du rococo It is mere twaddle; Brummagem finery; make-believe (Italian roco, uncouth )
A word used to describe an elaborate, fantastic style of decoration fashionable in 18th century France, and popular in England in the mid-18th century Motifs included flowers, leaves, shells, scrolls and florid curves, such as those on the decorative friezes of console and pier tables, mirrors, etc
having excessive asymmetrical ornamentation; "an exquisite gilded rococo mirror"
Of or pertaining to the style called rococo; like rococo; florid; fantastic
A very elaborate style of European design originating in France during the early 1700's
An 18th Century European style noted for ornate and asymmetrical decoration based on natural forms including flowers, fruit, leaves, shells, and rocks (rocaille) from which its name is derived Associated with Louis XV
(English) A style of artistic production that flourished in Europe in the first half of the 18th century Often linked to the regency and court of Louis XV in France, the term now evokes a style that featured pale colors, asymmetric and curving forms, dainty figures, and fantastic, hybrid compositions in painting, sculpture, and the decorative arts
a delicate, light-hearted and elegant style based on asymmetrical natural forms An 18th Century style of art and decoration with a concern for the trivial rather than the significant; colorful and capricious, closely linked historically with the fashionable reign of Louis XV of France; the style was in reaction against the oppressive formality of French classical baroque Artists include: Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, and Tiepolo
artistic style of the early eighteenth century characterized by energy, lightness, delicacy, playfulness, and self-conscious artificiality; it was replaced by a more stern neoclassicism
Final phase of Baroque style, involving light and often naturalistic ornamentation
Artistic movement of France during the end of the reign on Louis XIV and took hold during the reign of Louis XV This style was mostly adapted to interiors Paintings in the rococo style dominated glossy colors and mellow tones, representing mischievous and frivolous themes The style preferred rare and precious materials including Chinese lacquer and porcelain Rococo is a fragile, pastel and dainty version of the baroque style
Rococo style
or Late Baroque Style in interior design, the decorative arts, painting, architecture, and sculpture that originated in Paris in the early 18th century. The word Rococo is derived from French rocaille, denoting the shell-covered rockwork used to decorate artificial grottoes. Reacting against the ponderous Baroque that had become the official style of Louis XIV's reign, the Rococo was light, elegant, and elaborately ornamented. Several interior designers, painters, and engravers among them Pierre Le Pautre, Juste-Aurèle Meissonier, Jean Berain, and Nicolas Pineau developed a lighter and more intimate style of decoration for the new residences of nobles in Paris, and the style was disseminated throughout France by means of engravings. In these designers' work, walls, ceilings, and moldings feature interlacings of curves and countercurves based on S and C shapes as well as on shell forms and other natural shapes. Chinese motifs were also employed (see chinoiserie). Rococo painting was characterized by easygoing treatments of mythological and courtship themes, delicate brushwork, and sensuous colouring; notable practitioners included Antoine Watteau, François Boucher, and Jean-Honoré Fragonard. The Rococo style spread throughout France and other countries, principally Germany and Austria. Among the finest German examples of Rococo architecture is the church designed by Balthasar Neumann at Vierzehnheiligen, near Lichtenfels, in Bavaria. In Italy the Rococo style was concentrated primarily in Venice, where it was epitomized by the large-scale decorative paintings of Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
rococo