milton

listen to the pronunciation of milton
İngilizce - İngilizce
Milton Keynes - large new town in England, 90km north of London
A male given name derived from the surname
A habitational surname
Name of many towns in Canada and the US
An English habitational surname
The English poet : w: John Milton (1608-1674)
{i} family name; male first name; John Milton (1608-1674), renowned English poet, author of "Paradise Lost" and "Paradise Regained"; name of several cities and towns in the United States (such as Milton, North Dakota; Milton, Florida etc.); village in Nova Scotia (Canada); small punk rock band from Pennsylvania (USA)
derived from the surname
Babbitt Milton Byron Berle Milton Milton Berlinger Friedman Milton Hart Lorenz Milton Hay John Milton Milton Gruenwald Lear Norman Milton Milton John Obote Apollo Milton Milton Rauschenberg Roth Philip Milton
English poet; remembered primarily as the author of an epic poem describing humanity's fall from grace (1608-1674)
eruption
freightage
Milton Keynes
Originally a village in Buckinghamshire, now a purpose-built city in south-east England, containing the towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford and many smaller villages

Nearby was the tidier town of Tychy, a faceless Milton Keynes type of place without the roundabouts.

Milton Avery
{i} (1893-1965) American painter who mainly produced landscapes and still lifes
Milton Babbitt
born May 10, 1916, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. U.S. composer. At Princeton University he studied with composer Roger Sessions and later joined the faculty. He became one of the first U.S. 12-tone composers, and he was (with his Three Compositions for Piano, 1947) perhaps the first composer to write totally serialized music based on ordered structures not only of pitch but of elements such as rhythm and dynamics. The first composer to work with RCA's Mark II synthesizer, he became one of the first Americans to write electronically synthesized music. He wrote various pieces combining live performers and tape
Milton Berle
orig. Milton Berlinger born July 12, 1908, New York, N.Y., U.S. died March 27, 2002, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. comedian. He appeared in vaudeville from age 10 and later acted in more than 50 silent films. He worked chiefly as a nightclub comedian (1939-49) while vainly seeking a radio audience. His slapstick routines and facial contortions, however, were more suited to a visual medium, and between 1937 and 1968 he appeared in 19 movies. His greatest success came with the television variety show Texaco Star Theater (1948-54), a show so popular that many people are said to have bought television sets just to watch "Uncle Miltie
Milton Bradley
{i} large American company, leading manufacturer of games and toys
Milton Byron Babbitt
{i} (born 1916) U.S. composer
Milton Byron Babbitt
born May 10, 1916, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. U.S. composer. At Princeton University he studied with composer Roger Sessions and later joined the faculty. He became one of the first U.S. 12-tone composers, and he was (with his Three Compositions for Piano, 1947) perhaps the first composer to write totally serialized music based on ordered structures not only of pitch but of elements such as rhythm and dynamics. The first composer to work with RCA's Mark II synthesizer, he became one of the first Americans to write electronically synthesized music. He wrote various pieces combining live performers and tape
Milton Friedman
{i} (1912-2006) American economist and advocate of the free market system, winner of the 1976 Nobel Prize for Economics
Milton Friedman
a US economist who helped to develop the idea of monetarism, the belief that the best way for a government to manage a country's economic system is to limit the amount of money that is available to be used. He won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1976, and his ideas had an important influence on politics in the 1980s, because the economic policies of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan were based on them (1912- ). born July 31, 1912, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. U.S. economist. Friedman studied at Rutgers and Columbia before joining the faculty of the University of Chicago in 1946. There he became the leading U.S. advocate of monetarism. He oversaw the economic transition in Chile after the overthrow of Salvador Allende. In the 1980s his ideas were taken up by Pres. Ronald Reagan and Britain's Margaret Thatcher. His many books include A Theory of the Consumption Function (1957) and Capitalism and Freedom (1962), both with his wife, Rose Friedman, and A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960 (1963) and Monetary Trends of the United States and the United Kingdom (1981), with economist Anna Schwartz. He received the Nobel Prize in 1976
Milton Hershey
{i} Milton Snavely Hershey (1857-1946) United States philanthropist and industrialist who founded the Hershey Chocolate Company in 1903 and founded the town of Hershey (Pennsylvania, USA) in 1909
Milton Keynes
A town of south-central England northeast of Oxford. It was designated as a new town in 1967 to alleviate overcrowding in London. Population: 184,440. a town in central southern England that was developed in 1967 as a new town. The Open University is based there
Milton Obote
born Dec. 28, 1924, Akoroko village, Lango, Uganda First prime minister (1962-70) and president (1966-71, 1980-85) of Uganda. Elected to the legislative council in 1958, he led his country to independence in 1962. As prime minister he accepted a constitution that granted federal status to five traditional kingdoms, including Buganda, but in 1966 he sent troops under Gen. Idi Amin to subdue Buganda's ruler, Mutesa II, and abolished all the kingdoms. He was overthrown in a coup led by Amin in 1971 but returned after Amin was deposed in 1979 to establish a repressive government. Having neglected, despite his own often brutal policies, to quell the ethnic strife between northern and southern ethnic groups, he was again ousted in 1985. He settled in Zambia
Miltonic
Of a style comparable to that of Milton's writing
Miltonic
Of or relating to the literary works of John Milton
Apollo Milton Obote
born Dec. 28, 1924, Akoroko village, Lango, Uganda First prime minister (1962-70) and president (1966-71, 1980-85) of Uganda. Elected to the legislative council in 1958, he led his country to independence in 1962. As prime minister he accepted a constitution that granted federal status to five traditional kingdoms, including Buganda, but in 1966 he sent troops under Gen. Idi Amin to subdue Buganda's ruler, Mutesa II, and abolished all the kingdoms. He was overthrown in a coup led by Amin in 1971 but returned after Amin was deposed in 1979 to establish a repressive government. Having neglected, despite his own often brutal policies, to quell the ethnic strife between northern and southern ethnic groups, he was again ousted in 1985. He settled in Zambia
John Milton
an English poet who many people consider to be one of the most important writers in English literature.He wrote the epic poems Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained after he had gone blind. Before this, he was active in politics as a strong supporter of religious freedom and of Oliver Cromwell (1608-74). born Dec. 9, 1608, London, Eng. died Nov. 8, 1674, Chalfont St. Giles, Buckinghamshire English poet. A brilliant youth, Milton attended Cambridge University (1625-32), where he wrote poems in Latin, Italian, and English; these included "L'Allegro" and "Il Penseroso", both published later in Poems (1645). During 1632-38 he engaged in private study writing the masque Comus (1637) and the extraordinary elegy "Lycidas" (1638) and toured Italy. Concerned with the Puritan cause in England, he spent much of 1641-60 pamphleteering for civil and religious liberty and serving in Oliver Cromwell's government. His best-known prose is in the pamphlets Areopagitica (1644), on freedom of the press, and Of Education (1644). He lost his sight 1651, and thereafter dictated his works. His disastrous first marriage ended with his wife's death in 1652; two later marriages were more successful. After the Restoration he was arrested as a noted defender of the Commonwealth but was soon released. In Paradise Lost (1667), his epic masterpiece on the Fall of Man written in blank verse, he uses his sublime "grand style" with superb power; his characterization of Satan is a supreme achievement. He further expressed his purified faith in God and the regenerative strength of the individual soul in Paradise Regained (1671), an epic in which Christ overcomes Satan the tempter, and Samson Agonistes (1671), a tragedy in which the Old Testament figure conquers self-pity and despair to become God's champion. Considered second only to William Shakespeare in the history of English-language poetry, Milton had an immense influence on later literature; though attacked early in the 20th century, he had regained his place in the Western canon by mid century
John Milton
{i} (1608-1674) renowned English poet, author of "Paradise Lost" and "Paradise Regained
John Milton Hay
born Oct. 8, 1838, Salem, Ind., U.S. died July 1, 1905, Newbury, N.H. U.S. diplomat and writer. He studied law in Springfield, Ill., where he met Abraham Lincoln. He served as President Lincoln's private secretary (1861-65) and then held diplomatic posts in Europe (1865-70). After writing editorials for the New York Tribune (1870-75), he served as assistant secretary of state (1879-81). He coauthored a 10-volume biography of Lincoln (1890). He was appointed ambassador to Britain (1897-98) by Pres. William McKinley. As secretary of state (1898-1905), Hay helped negotiate the end of the Spanish-American War, supported the decision to retain the Philippines for the U.S., promulgated the Open Door policy, and negotiated treaties that gave the U.S. an exclusive right to build the Panama Canal
Jr. John Milton Cage
in full John Milton Cage, Jr. born Sept. 5, 1912, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. died Aug. 12, 1992, New York, N.Y. U.S. avant-garde composer and writer. The son of an inventor, Cage studied music with Arnold Schoenberg and Henry Cowell. From the early 1940s he was closely associated with the choreographer Merce Cunningham. Though he began as a 12-tone composer (see serialism), by 1943 his sonic experiments had marked him as notably original. He soon turned to Zen Buddhism and concluded that all activities that make up music are part of a single natural process and that all sounds are potentially musical; thenceforth he advocated indeterminism and endeavoured to ensure randomness in his works, using increasingly inventive notation and often relying on the Confucian classic Yijing. By the 1960s he had expanded into the realm of multimedia. His disparate works include Bacchanale for prepared piano (1938), Imaginary Landscape No. 4 for 12 radios (1951), Fontana Mix for tape (1958), HPSCHD for seven harpsichords, 51 tapes, and nonmusical media (1969), and Roaratorio (1979). His widely read books include Silence (1961), A Year from Monday (1967), Notations (1969), and M (1973). His international influence was far greater than that of any previous American composer
Lorenz Milton Hart
a US songwriter who worked with the composer Richard Rodgers to produce musicals (=films or plays that use singing and dancing to tell a story) , such as Babes in Arms and Pal Joey (1895-1943). born May 2, 1895, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 22, 1943, New York City U.S. lyricist. A descendant of Heinrich Heine, Hart initially worked as a translator of German. In 1918 he met Richard Rodgers, then age 16, at Columbia University. Their many Broadway hits would include The Garrick Gaieties (1925), A Connecticut Yankee (1927), The Boys from Syracuse (1938), and Pal Joey (1940). Their 25-year collaboration (often difficult because of Hart's alcoholism and aversion to deadlines) yielded nearly 1,000 songs, including "Blue Moon" (their only song not introduced on stage or film), "My Funny Valentine," "The Lady Is a Tramp," and "Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered." Hart died of liver failure at age 48
Miltonic
{s} of or pertaining to John Milton; similar to the writing style of John Milton
Miltonic
miltonian
Norman Milton Lear
born July 27, 1922, New Haven, Conn., U.S. U.S. producer, writer, and director. He first worked in public relations and later in television as a comedy writer and director (1950-59). He wrote and produced movies such as Come Blow Your Horn (1963), Divorce American Style (1967), and Cold Turkey (1971) before returning to television to create and produce hit series such as All in the Family (1971-83), for which he received four Emmy Awards; Maude (1972-78); Sanford and Son (1972-77); and The Jeffersons (1975-85). He founded the progressive activist group People for the American Way
Philip Milton Roth
born March 19, 1933, Newark, N.J.,U.S. U.S. writer. Roth attended the University of Chicago and first achieved fame with Goodbye Columbus (1959), whose title story concerns the boorish materialism of a suburban family. His works are characterized by an acute ear for dialogue, a concern with Jewish middle-class life, and the painful entanglements of sexual and familial love. Among his subsequent novels are the comic and scandalous Portnoy's Complaint (1969) and an admired series centring on a writer named Nathan Zuckerman, including The Ghost Writer (1979) and Zuckerman Unbound (1981). His later works include Sabbath's Theater (1995, National Book Award) and American Pastoral (1997, Pulitzer Prize)
miltonic
Of, pertaining to, or resembling, Milton, or his writings; as, Miltonic prose
milton

    Heceleme

    Mil·ton

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    mîltın

    Telaffuz

    /ˈməltən/ /ˈmɪltən/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'mil-t&n ] (biographical name.) Old English place name from mylen + tun "mill settlement" and middel + tun "middle settlement".

    Videolar

    ... Milton: WHOO HOO HOO HOO HOO! ...
    ... Milton wrote or when Shakespeare wrote or even when Dickens wrote?  Their names will ...

    Günün kelimesi

    tachyphagia