lewis

listen to the pronunciation of lewis
İngilizce - İngilizce
The title given to a partially apprenticed Freemason who is normally the Master or Son of a practicing Freemason; One practising or learning the degrees of Freemasonry after introduction to the degrees and before full induction or before becoming a Worshipful Brother
The Isle of Lewis, Scotland
A Welsh surname; anglicized form of Llewellyn
An English patronymic surname
A male given name of Norman origin, the English form of Louis
A cramp iron inserted into a cavity in order to lift heavy stones; used as a symbol of strength in Freemasonry
The title given to a partially apprenticed Freemason who is normally the Master or Son of a practicing Freemason; One practising or learning the degrees of Freemasonary after introduction to the degrees and before full induction or before becoming a Worshipful Brother
American soldier and explorer who led the Lewis and Clark expedition (1803-1806) from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River and served as governor of the Louisiana Territory (1806-1809). British writer and artist. He wrote the novels The Apes of God (1930) and Revenge for Love (1937) and painted portraits of T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. See Cecil Day Lewis. British writer and critic. His works include The Allegory of Love (1936) and a series of fictional books for children collectively known as The Chronicles of Narnia (1950-1956). American biologist who shared a 1995 Nobel Prize in medicine. His research showed how a family of genes controls the embryonic development of the body segment of fruit flies. American novelist who satirized middle-class America in his 22 works, including Babbitt (1922) and Elmer Gantry (1927). He was the first American to receive (1930) a Nobel Prize for literature. American conductor who, with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, became the first African American to conduct a major symphony orchestra (1961). American musician and singer. Noted for his lively performing style and driving piano rhythms, he created such hit songs as "Great Balls of Fire" (1957). American labor leader who was president of the United Mine Workers of America (1920-1960) and the Congress of Industrial Organizations (1935-1940). British gothic writer who is remembered for the novel The Monk (1796), for which he was known as "Monk Lewis.". Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Binford Lewis Roberts Carroll Lewis Cass Lewis Day Lewis Cecil Hine Lewis Wickes Johnson Rafer Lewis Lewis and Clark Expedition Lewis Clarence Irving Lewis Clive Staples Lewis Frederick Carlton Lewis Edward B. Lewis Jerry Lewis Jerry Lee Lewis John Llewellyn Lewis Lennox Lennox Claudius Lewis Lewis Matthew Gregory Lewis Meriwether Lewis Harry Sinclair Lewis Percy Wyndham Morgan Lewis Henry Mumford Lewis Paul Lewis Powell Lewis Franklin Jr. Stimson Henry Lewis Terman Lewis Madison Thomas Lewis Wallace Lewis Willkie Wendell Lewis
of Norman origin, the English form of Louis
{i} male first name; family name
An English surname derived from the given name
United States explorer and soldier who lead led an expedition from St Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River (1774-1809)
United States rock star singer and pianist (born in 1935)
United States novelist who satirized middle-class America in his novel Main Street (1885-1951)
United States labor leader who was president of the United Mine Workers of America from 1920 to 1960 and president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations from 1935 to 1940 (1880-1969)
English critic and novelist; author of theological works and of books for children (1898-1963) United States novelist who satirized middle-class America in his novel Main Street (1885-1951) United States labor leader who was president of the United Mine Workers of America from 1920 to 1960 and president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations from 1935 to 1940 (1880-1969) United States explorer and soldier who lead led an expedition from St
An iron dovetailed tenon, made in sections, which can be fitted into a dovetail mortise; used in hoisting large stones, etc
United States athlete who won gold medals at the Olympics for his skill in sprinting and jumping (born in 1961)
English critic and novelist; author of theological works and of books for children (1898-1963)
A kind of shears used in cropping woolen cloth
Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River (1774-1809) United States athlete who won gold medals at the Olympics for his skill in sprinting and jumping (born in 1961) United States rock star singer and pianist (born in 1935)
hag-ridden
Lewis acid
Any electrophylic compound that can accept a pair of electrons and form a coordinate covalent bond
Lewis acids
plural form of Lewis acid
Lewis base
Any nucleophylic compound that can donate a pair of electrons and form a coordinate covalent bond
Lewis bases
plural form of Lewis base
Lewis Carroll
pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-1898, English mathematician and writer, author of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass")
Lewis Carroll
a British writer who wrote two very famous children's stories, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. His real name was Charles Dodgson, and he was also a teacher of mathematics at Oxford University (1832-98). orig. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson born Jan. 27, 1832, Daresbury, Cheshire, Eng. died Jan. 14, 1898, Guildford, Surrey British logician, mathematician, and novelist. An unmarried deacon and a lecturer in mathematics at the University of Oxford, he enjoyed the company of young girls. His novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865; illustrated by John Tenniel) is based on stories he told to amuse young friends, especially Alice Liddell. Its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass (1871), describes Alice's further adventures. The two books, full of whimsy but also of sophisticated wit and puzzles, became among the most famous and admired children's books in the world. Carroll's other works include the narrative nonsense poem The Hunting of the Snark (1876) and the children's novels Sylvie and Bruno (1889) and Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893). He was also an important early portrait photographer
Lewis Cass
born Oct. 9, 1782, Exeter, N.H., U.S. died June 17, 1866, Detroit, Mich. U.S. politician. He fought in the War of 1812 and served as governor of Michigan Territory (1813-31). As secretary of war (1831-36) under Pres. Andrew Jackson, he directed the conduct of the Black Hawk and Seminole wars. He served as U.S. minister to France (1836-42). In the U.S. Senate (1845-48, 1849-57), he supported westward expansion and the Compromise of 1850. He was the Democratic nominee in the presidential election of 1848, which he lost to Zachary Taylor. He later served as secretary of state (1857-60) but resigned when Pres. James Buchanan took no action to counter the secession of the Southern states
Lewis F Jr. Powell
born Sept. 19, 1907, Suffolk, Va., U.S. died Aug. 25, 1998, Richmond, Va. U.S. jurist. After studying law at Washington and Lee University and Harvard University, he returned to practice law in Virginia. As chairman of the Richmond school board, he oversaw peaceful school integration in 1959; he later chaired the state board of education and served as president of the American Bar Association. Widely respected in legal circles, he was nominated to the Supreme Court of the United States by Pres. Richard Nixon in 1971; he took his seat in 1972 and served until 1987. He adopted moderate-to-liberal positions on civil rights, affirmative action, and separation of church and state, though his views on law enforcement were conservative
Lewis Franklin Jr. Powell
born Sept. 19, 1907, Suffolk, Va., U.S. died Aug. 25, 1998, Richmond, Va. U.S. jurist. After studying law at Washington and Lee University and Harvard University, he returned to practice law in Virginia. As chairman of the Richmond school board, he oversaw peaceful school integration in 1959; he later chaired the state board of education and served as president of the American Bar Association. Widely respected in legal circles, he was nominated to the Supreme Court of the United States by Pres. Richard Nixon in 1971; he took his seat in 1972 and served until 1987. He adopted moderate-to-liberal positions on civil rights, affirmative action, and separation of church and state, though his views on law enforcement were conservative
Lewis Henry Morgan
born Nov. 21, 1818, near Aurora, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 17, 1881, Rochester, N.Y. U.S. ethnologist and a principal founder of scientific anthropology. Morgan developed a deep interest in the American Indians and in 1846 was eventually adopted by the Seneca. His Systems of Consanguinity and Affinity of the Human Family (1871) was a world survey of kinship systems that sought to establish connections between cultures and particularly to establish the Asiatic origin of the American Indians. This work led to a comprehensive theory of sociocultural evolution, set forth in Ancient Society (1877). He claimed that advances in social organization arose primarily from changes in food production and that society had progressed from a hunting-and-gathering stage ("savagery") to one of settled agriculture ("barbarism") to modern "civilization." This theory, with the related theory that society originated in a state of sexual promiscuity and advanced through various forms of family life before culminating in monogamy, is now obsolete. For many years, however, Morgan was the dean of American anthropology, and his pioneering ideas influenced the theories of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, among others
Lewis Libby
{i} I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Jr. (born 1950), former assistant to President George W. Bush and former chief of staff from 2001 to 2005 to US vice-president Dick Cheney
Lewis M Terman
born Jan. 15, 1877, Johnson county, Ind., U.S. died Dec. 21, 1956, Palo Alto, Calif. U.S. psychologist. After joining the faculty of Stanford University in 1910, he revised the Binet-Simon intelligence scale and published the Stanford-Binet IQ test (1916), which soon was widely adopted in the U.S. During World War I he developed group intelligence testing for the U.S. Army, and in 1921 he launched a long-term program for the study of gifted children. He wrote The Measurement of Intelligence (1916) and coauthored Genetic Studies of Genius (5 vol., 1926-59)
Lewis Madison Terman
born Jan. 15, 1877, Johnson county, Ind., U.S. died Dec. 21, 1956, Palo Alto, Calif. U.S. psychologist. After joining the faculty of Stanford University in 1910, he revised the Binet-Simon intelligence scale and published the Stanford-Binet IQ test (1916), which soon was widely adopted in the U.S. During World War I he developed group intelligence testing for the U.S. Army, and in 1921 he launched a long-term program for the study of gifted children. He wrote The Measurement of Intelligence (1916) and coauthored Genetic Studies of Genius (5 vol., 1926-59)
Lewis Mumford
born Oct. 19, 1895, Flushing, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 26, 1990, Amenia, N.Y. U.S. architectural critic, urban planner, and cultural historian. After studying at the City College of New York and at the New School for Social Research, he taught at various universities and wrote for The New Yorker, The Dial, and other magazines. In works such as Technics and Civilization (1934), The City in History (1961), and The Myth of the Machine (3 vol., 1967-70), Mumford analyzed the effects of technology and urbanization on human societies, criticizing the dehumanizing tendencies of modern technological society and urging that it be brought into harmony with humanistic goals and aspirations. See also urban planning
Lewis Paul
died April 1759, Kensington, Middlesex, Eng. British inventor. Working with John Wyatt from about 1730, he developed the first power spinning machine (see drawing frame), which they patented in 1738. It operated by drawing cotton or wool through pairs of successively faster rollers. It was eventually replaced by Richard Arkwright's water frame. Paul also patented a carding machine in 1748
Lewis R Binford
born Nov. 21, 1930, Norfolk, Va., U.S. U.S. archaeologist. Binford taught principally at the University of New Mexico. In the mid 1960s he initiated what came to be known as the "New Archaeology," which champions the use of quantitative methods and the practice of archaeology as a rigorous science. He applied the new methodology in an influential study of Mousterian artifacts and later extended it to a study of the hunting activities of a living people, the Nunamiut, trying to draw analogies to prehistoric contexts
Lewis Range
A section of the Rocky Mountains in northwest Montana rising to 3,192.1 m (10,466 ft) at Mount Cleveland
Lewis Roberts Binford
born Nov. 21, 1930, Norfolk, Va., U.S. U.S. archaeologist. Binford taught principally at the University of New Mexico. In the mid 1960s he initiated what came to be known as the "New Archaeology," which champions the use of quantitative methods and the practice of archaeology as a rigorous science. He applied the new methodology in an influential study of Mousterian artifacts and later extended it to a study of the hunting activities of a living people, the Nunamiut, trying to draw analogies to prehistoric contexts
Lewis Sinclair
{i} (1885-1951) USA novelist and playwright
Lewis Thomas
born Nov. 25, 1913, Flushing, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 3, 1993, New York City U.S. physician and author. He attended medical school at Harvard and later taught at various universities. He was president of New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (1973-83). He translated his passionate interest in and wonder at the intricate mysteries of biology into lucid meditations and reflections on biology in award-winning essays. The best-known of his widely read books is The Lives of a Cell (1974, National Book Award)
Lewis Wallace
born April 10, 1827, Brookville, Ind., U.S. died Feb. 15, 1905, Crawfordsville, Ind. U.S. writer. The son of Indiana's governor, he served in the Mexican War and in the American Civil War, in which he rose to the rank of major general. Later he returned to law practice, interrupted by two diplomatic postings. His literary reputation rests on three historical novels: The Fair God (1873), on the Spanish conquest of Mexico; The Prince of India (1893), on the Byzantine Empire; and, above all, the enormously popular Ben-Hur (1880; films, 1925, 1959), a romantic tale set in the Roman Empire during the time of Christ
Lewis Wickes Hine
born Sept. 26, 1874, Oshkosh, Wis., U.S. died Nov. 3, 1940, Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. U.S. photographer. He was trained as a sociologist. In 1904 he began to photograph immigrants at Ellis Island and the tenements and sweatshops where they lived and worked. In 1911 he was hired by the National Child Labor Committee to record child labour conditions. Traveling throughout the East, he produced appalling pictures of exploited children. In World War I he worked as a photographer with the Red Cross. On returning to New York City, he photographed the construction of the Empire State Building. For the rest of his life he photographed government projects
Lewis and Clark
two explorers, Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) and William Clark (1770-1838), who travelled across North America from 1804 to 1806, going up the Missouri River and over the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific coast. They drew maps and gathered information about the Native American people who lived there
Lewis and Clark Expedition
(1804-06) First overland expedition to the U.S. Pacific coast and back, led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Initiated by Pres. Thomas Jefferson, the expedition set out to find an overland route to the Pacific, documenting its exploration through the new Louisiana Purchase. About 40 men, skilled in various trades, left St. Louis in 1804. They traveled up the Missouri River into present-day North Dakota, where they built Fort Mandan (later Bismarck) and wintered among the Mandan Sioux. They left the next spring, hiring Toussaint Charbonneau and his Indian wife, Sacagawea, who served as guide and interpreter. They traveled through Montana and by horse over the Continental Divide to the headwaters of the Clearwater River. They built canoes to carry them to the Snake River and then to the mouth of the Columbia River, where they built Fort Clatsop (later Astoria, Ore.) and spent the winter. On the journey back the group divided, then reunited to canoe down the Missouri to St. Louis, arriving to great acclaim in September 1806. All but one member of the expedition survived. The journals kept by Lewis and others documented Indian tribes, wildlife, and geography and did much to dispel the myth of an easy water route to the Pacific
Lewis gun
{i} light machine gun with a round magazine developed in 1911 in the USA and first used in WWI
Lewis with Harris
An island of northwest Scotland. The largest and northernmost of the Outer Hebrides, it is noted for its tweeds
lewis and clark expedition
an expedition sent by Thomas Jefferson to explore the northwestern territories of the United States; led by Merriwether Lewis and William Clark; traveled from St
lewis and clark expedition
Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River from 1803 to 1806
Lennox Lewis
in full Lennox Claudius Lewis born Sept. 2, 1965, London, Eng. British boxer. His professional career began in 1989 in England. He won the World Boxing Council (WBC) heavyweight title in 1992, lost it in 1994, and recaptured it in 1997. In 1999 he faced American Evander Holyfield, who held the heavyweight titles of the World Boxing Association (WBA) and the International Boxing Federation (IBF). In a controversial decision, the fight was called a draw. In the rematch that same year Lewis emerged as the undisputed champion, thereby unifying the heavyweight title. (The IBF and WBA portions of the title were later taken from Lewis because of disputes concerning mandatory fights, but he retained the WBC title and was still considered the undisputed champion by many in boxing.) In his 2002 bout with American Mike Tyson, Lewis knocked Tyson out in the eighth round
Duckworth-Lewis method
A mathematical algorithm for generating revised target scores for the side batting second in a rain-affected one-day match
Barbara Lewis
(born 1943) American pop and soul singer
C Day-Lewis
born April 27, 1904, Ballintubbert, County Leix, Ire. died May 22, 1972, Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire, Eng. Irish-born British poet. Son of a clergyman, Day-Lewis studied at the University of Oxford and in the 1930s became part of a circle of left-wing poets centred on W.H. Auden, though he later turned to an individual lyricism expressed in traditional forms. His works include translations of Virgil's Georgics (1940), Aeneid (1952), and Eclogues (1963) and the verse collections The Room (1965) and The Whispering Roots (1970). He also wrote the autobiography The Buried Day (1960) and several detective novels under the pseudonym Nicholas Blake. He became poet laureate of England in 1968. He was the father of actor Daniel Day-Lewis
C Lewis
born April 12, 1883, Stoneham, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 3, 1964, Cambridge, Mass. U.S. philosopher. He taught primarily at Harvard University (1920-53). His best-known works are Mind and the World Order (1929), Symbolic Logic (1932), An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation (1947), and The Ground and Nature of the Right (1955). He maintained that knowledge is possible only where there is also a possibility of error. His position in epistemology represents a synthesis of empiricism and pragmatism
C S Lewis
born Nov. 29, 1898, Belfast, Ire. died Nov. 22, 1963, Oxford, Oxfordshire, Eng. Irish-born British scholar and writer. Lewis taught first at Oxford (1925-54) and later at Cambridge (1954-63). An early volume, the critical Allegory of Love (1936) on medieval and Renaissance literature, is often considered his finest scholarly work. He became known in England and the U.S. for several series of BBC radio broadcasts during the war years on the subject of Christianity. Many of his books embrace Christian apologetics; the best known is The Screwtape Letters (1942), a satirical epistolary novel in which an experienced devil instructs his young charge in the art of temptation. Also well known are The Chronicles of Narnia (1950-56), a series of seven children's stories (including The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, 1950) that have become classics of fantasy; and a science-fiction trilogy, known mostly for its first volume, Out of the Silent Planet (1938)
C. S. Lewis
a British writer and university teacher. He wrote literary and religious works but is famous for his children's stories The Chronicles of Narnia, which include the well-known novel The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1898-1963)
Carl Lewis
born July 1, 1961, Birmingham, Ala., U.S. U.S. track-and-field athlete. He qualified for the 1980 Olympics but did not participate, because of the U.S. boycott of the Moscow games. At the 1984 Olympics he won the 100-m and 200-m races, the long jump, and the 4 100-m relay. At the 1988 Olympics he won the long jump (becoming the first athlete ever to win that event consecutively) and the 100-m race and received a silver medal in the 200-m. In 1992 he again won the long jump and anchored the winning U.S. 4 100-m relay team, and in 1996 he astounded observers by winning a fourth consecutive long-jump title
Cecil Day-Lewis
born April 27, 1904, Ballintubbert, County Leix, Ire. died May 22, 1972, Hadley Wood, Hertfordshire, Eng. Irish-born British poet. Son of a clergyman, Day-Lewis studied at the University of Oxford and in the 1930s became part of a circle of left-wing poets centred on W.H. Auden, though he later turned to an individual lyricism expressed in traditional forms. His works include translations of Virgil's Georgics (1940), Aeneid (1952), and Eclogues (1963) and the verse collections The Room (1965) and The Whispering Roots (1970). He also wrote the autobiography The Buried Day (1960) and several detective novels under the pseudonym Nicholas Blake. He became poet laureate of England in 1968. He was the father of actor Daniel Day-Lewis
Charles Lewis Tiffany
{i} (1812-1902) American merchant and jeweler, founder of the luxury jewelry store "Tiffany and Company", man who introduced sterling silver as the standard in jewelry making
Clarence Irving Lewis
born April 12, 1883, Stoneham, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 3, 1964, Cambridge, Mass. U.S. philosopher. He taught primarily at Harvard University (1920-53). His best-known works are Mind and the World Order (1929), Symbolic Logic (1932), An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation (1947), and The Ground and Nature of the Right (1955). He maintained that knowledge is possible only where there is also a possibility of error. His position in epistemology represents a synthesis of empiricism and pragmatism
Clive Staples Lewis
born Nov. 29, 1898, Belfast, Ire. died Nov. 22, 1963, Oxford, Oxfordshire, Eng. Irish-born British scholar and writer. Lewis taught first at Oxford (1925-54) and later at Cambridge (1954-63). An early volume, the critical Allegory of Love (1936) on medieval and Renaissance literature, is often considered his finest scholarly work. He became known in England and the U.S. for several series of BBC radio broadcasts during the war years on the subject of Christianity. Many of his books embrace Christian apologetics; the best known is The Screwtape Letters (1942), a satirical epistolary novel in which an experienced devil instructs his young charge in the art of temptation. Also well known are The Chronicles of Narnia (1950-56), a series of seven children's stories (including The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, 1950) that have become classics of fantasy; and a science-fiction trilogy, known mostly for its first volume, Out of the Silent Planet (1938)
Daniel Day-Lewis
(born 1957) British movie actor, winner of the 1989 Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in "My left Foot
Day Lewis
Irish-born poet and critic who became poet laureate in 1968 and wrote detective novels under the pen name Nicholas Blake
Edward B. Lewis
born May 20, 1918, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., U.S. died July 21, 2004, Pasadena, Calif. U.S. geneticist. He received a Ph.D. (1942) in genetics from the California Institute of Technology, where he taught from 1946 to 1988. By crossbreeding thousands of fruit flies, he discovered that genes are arranged on the chromosome in the order corresponding to body segments, an orderliness now known as the colinearity principle. Lewis's work helped explain mechanisms of general biological development, including the causes of deformities present at birth in humans. With Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric F. Wieschaus, he was awarded a 1995 Nobel Prize
Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor
orig. (Ferdinand) Lew(is) Alcindor born April 16, 1947, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. basketball player. During his college career at UCLA, the team lost only two games, and he led it to three national championships (1966-68). He then joined the Milwaukee Bucks; in 1975 he was traded to the Los Angeles Lakers. Standing 7 ft 1 3 8 in. (2 m 17 cm), he was the dominant centre of his time and helped his teams to six NBA titles. By the time he retired in 1989, he had scored a record 38,387 points. He also set the record for most field goals (15,837) and most minutes played (57,446). He was voted Most Valuable Player a record six times
Frederick Carlton Lewis
born July 1, 1961, Birmingham, Ala., U.S. U.S. track-and-field athlete. He qualified for the 1980 Olympics but did not participate, because of the U.S. boycott of the Moscow games. At the 1984 Olympics he won the 100-m and 200-m races, the long jump, and the 4 100-m relay. At the 1988 Olympics he won the long jump (becoming the first athlete ever to win that event consecutively) and the 100-m race and received a silver medal in the 200-m. In 1992 he again won the long jump and anchored the winning U.S. 4 100-m relay team, and in 1996 he astounded observers by winning a fourth consecutive long-jump title
Harry Sinclair Lewis
born Feb. 7, 1885, Sauk Center, Minn., U.S. died Jan. 10, 1951, near Rome, Italy U.S. novelist and social critic. He worked as a reporter and magazine writer before making his literary reputation with Main Street (1920), a portrayal of Midwestern provincialism. Among his other popular satirical novels puncturing middle-class complacency are Babbitt (1922), a scathing study of a conformist businessman; Arrowsmith (1925), a look at the medical profession; Elmer Gantry (1927), an indictment of fundamentalist religion; and Dodsworth (1929), the story of a rich American couple in Europe. He won the 1930 Nobel Prize for Literature, the first given to an American. His later novels include Cass Timberlaine (1945). Lewis's reputation declined in later years, and he lived abroad much of the time. He was married to Dorothy Thompson from 1928 to 1942
Henry Lewis Stimson
born Sept. 21, 1867, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 20, 1950, Huntington, N.Y. U.S. statesman. A lawyer, he served as U.S. secretary of war (1911-13), governor of the Philippines (1927-29), and U.S. secretary of state (1929-33). After the Japanese occupation of Manchuria (1931), he sent to Japan a diplomatic note, the contents of which became known as the Stimson Doctrine, refusing to recognize territorial changes and reaffirming U.S. treaty rights. As secretary of war (1940-45), he oversaw the expansion and training of U.S. forces in World War II. He was the chief adviser on atomic policy to Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry Truman and recommended use of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Jr.
{i} Lewis Libby (born 1950), former assistant to President George W. Bush and former chief of staff from 2001 to 2005 to US vice-president Dick Cheney
Jerry Lee Lewis
born Sept. 29, 1935, Ferriday, La., U.S. U.S. rock-and-roll musician. He began playing piano in his childhood, influenced by blues and gospel musicians. He attended Bible school in Texas but was expelled. Returning to Louisiana, he played in several bands, perfecting his signature "pumping" piano technique (the left hand maintaining a driving boogie pattern while the right played flashy ornamentation). His first hits came in 1957 with "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" and "Great Balls of Fire." In 1958 it was discovered that he had married a 13-year-old relative, and his record sales dropped. Though he had a few more hits, he concentrated on his famously energetic and uninhibited live performances. His career continued to be plagued by controversy
Jerry Lewis
orig. Joseph Levitch born March 16, 1926, Newark, N.J., U.S. U.S. actor, director, and producer. In 1946 he developed a nightclub comedy routine with Dean Martin (1917-95), who played the suave crooner to Lewis's zany clown, and they appeared together in 16 movies, including My Friend Irma (1949) and Pardners (1956), before ending their partnership in 1956. Lewis then directed, produced, and acted in movies such as The Bellboy (1960) and The Nutty Professor (1963). These films, along with his collaborations with director Frank Tashlin, led many critics (especially in Europe) to regard Lewis as the comic heir to Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. Since 1966 Lewis has hosted the U.S. annual Muscular Dystrophy Telethon
John L Lewis
born Feb. 12, 1880, near Lucas, Iowa, U.S. died June 11, 1969, Washington, D.C. U.S. labour leader. The son of Welsh immigrants, he became a coal miner at age
John L Lewis
He rose through the ranks of the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) and from 1911 was also an organizer of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), with which the miners' union was affiliated. As president of the UMWA (1920-60), Lewis joined several other AFL union leaders in forming the Committee for Industrial Organization (1935) to organize workers in mass-production industries. On breaking with the AFL (see AFL-CIO), Lewis and other dissident union heads founded the Congress of Industrial Organizations. As its president (1936-40), Lewis presided over the often-violent struggle to introduce unionism into previously unorganized industries such as steel and automobiles. See also William Green; labour union; Philip Murray
John Llewellyn Lewis
He rose through the ranks of the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) and from 1911 was also an organizer of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), with which the miners' union was affiliated. As president of the UMWA (1920-60), Lewis joined several other AFL union leaders in forming the Committee for Industrial Organization (1935) to organize workers in mass-production industries. On breaking with the AFL (see AFL-CIO), Lewis and other dissident union heads founded the Congress of Industrial Organizations. As its president (1936-40), Lewis presided over the often-violent struggle to introduce unionism into previously unorganized industries such as steel and automobiles. See also William Green; labour union; Philip Murray
John Llewellyn Lewis
born Feb. 12, 1880, near Lucas, Iowa, U.S. died June 11, 1969, Washington, D.C. U.S. labour leader. The son of Welsh immigrants, he became a coal miner at age
Martin Lewis Perl
{i} (born 1927) United States physicist, Nobel laureate in Physics in 1995 for his discovery of the tau lepton
Matthew Gregory Lewis
born July 9, 1775, London, Eng. died May 4, 1818, at sea English novelist and dramatist. The sensational success of his gothic novel The Monk (1796) earned him the nickname "Monk" Lewis. Its horror, violence, and eroticism brought it a wide readership, though it was universally condemned. Lewis also wrote a popular music drama in the same vein, The Castle Spectre (1798). After inheriting a large fortune in Jamaica in 1812, he sailed twice to the island to inquire about the treatment of slaves on his estates there, and he died at sea. Journal of a West India Proprietor (1834) attests to his humane and liberal attitudes
Meriwether Lewis
Lewis and Clark. born Aug. 18, 1774, near Charlottesville, Va. died Oct. 11, 1809, near Nashville, Tenn., U.S. U.S. explorer. After serving in the militia during the Whiskey Rebellion (1794) in western Pennsylvania, he transferred into the regular army. In 1801 he became private secretary to Pres. Thomas Jefferson, who selected him to lead the first overland expedition to the Pacific Northwest, including the area of the Louisiana Purchase. At Lewis's request, William Clark was appointed to share the command. The success of the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804-06) was greatly due to Lewis's preparation and skill. At its conclusion, he and Clark each received 1,600 acres of land as a reward. Lewis was named governor of Louisiana Territory in 1808. He died under mysterious circumstances in an inn on the Natchez Trace while en route to Washington; whether his death resulted from murder or suicide is still a subject of controversy
Percy Wyndham Lewis
born Nov. 18, 1882, on a yacht near Amherst, Nova Scotia, Can. died March 7, 1957, London, Eng. English artist and writer. The founder and principal exponent of Vorticism, Lewis began a short-lived Vorticist review titled Blast in 1914. His first novel, Tarr, appeared in 1918. The Childermass (1928) was followed by the huge satirical novel The Apes of God (1930) and The Revenge for Love (1937). In the 1930s he produced some of his most noted paintings, including The Surrender of Barcelona (1936). He also wrote essays, short stories, and two admired memoirs. Notorious in the 1930s for championing fascism, he later recanted those beliefs
Rafer Lewis Johnson
born Aug. 18, 1935, Hillsboro, Texas, U.S. U.S. decathlete. While a student at UCLA, he won the decathlon gold medal at the 1955 Pan-American Games. At the 1960 Olympic Games he became the first African American athlete to carry the U.S. flag in the Olympic procession, and he captured the decathlon gold medalby narrowly defeating his UCLA teammate, Yang Chuan-kwang of Taiwan
Sinclair Lewis
a US writer of novels, including Main Street, Babbitt, and Elmer Gantry, in which he makes fun of life in small US towns. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1930 (1885-1951). born Feb. 7, 1885, Sauk Center, Minn., U.S. died Jan. 10, 1951, near Rome, Italy U.S. novelist and social critic. He worked as a reporter and magazine writer before making his literary reputation with Main Street (1920), a portrayal of Midwestern provincialism. Among his other popular satirical novels puncturing middle-class complacency are Babbitt (1922), a scathing study of a conformist businessman; Arrowsmith (1925), a look at the medical profession; Elmer Gantry (1927), an indictment of fundamentalist religion; and Dodsworth (1929), the story of a rich American couple in Europe. He won the 1930 Nobel Prize for Literature, the first given to an American. His later novels include Cass Timberlaine (1945). Lewis's reputation declined in later years, and he lived abroad much of the time. He was married to Dorothy Thompson from 1928 to 1942
Wendell Lewis Willkie
born Feb. 18, 1892, Elwood, Ind., U.S. died Oct. 8, 1944, New York, N.Y. U.S. politician. He moved to New York City in 1929 to become an attorney for the Commonwealth and Southern Corp., of which he was later president (1933-40). He led the opposition of utilities companies to competition from the federally funded Tennessee Valley Authority. His criticism of Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt led to his dark-horse victory at the 1940 Republican Party presidential convention. After a vigorous campaign, he won only 10 states but received more than 22 million popular votes, the largest number received by a Republican to that time. After a worldwide tour, he wrote One World (1943), a best-selling plea for postwar international cooperation
Wyndham Lewis
born Nov. 18, 1882, on a yacht near Amherst, Nova Scotia, Can. died March 7, 1957, London, Eng. English artist and writer. The founder and principal exponent of Vorticism, Lewis began a short-lived Vorticist review titled Blast in 1914. His first novel, Tarr, appeared in 1918. The Childermass (1928) was followed by the huge satirical novel The Apes of God (1930) and The Revenge for Love (1937). In the 1930s he produced some of his most noted paintings, including The Surrender of Barcelona (1936). He also wrote essays, short stories, and two admired memoirs. Notorious in the 1930s for championing fascism, he later recanted those beliefs
Türkçe - İngilizce

lewis teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

lewis oyuğu açma kalemi
lewising tool
lewis

    Heceleme

    lew·is

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    luîs

    Telaffuz

    /ˈlo͞oəs/ /ˈluːɪs/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'lü-&s ] (noun.) 1743. probably from the name Lewis.

    Videolar

    ... as and sheri lewis is doing right now on the keyboard east from you ...
    ... lewis in the united states ...

    Günün kelimesi

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