kennedy

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A female given name of modern American usage
A surname of Irish origin
John F. Kennedy, US President
of modern American usage
An Irish and Scottish surname, derived from the Gaelic Ó Ceannéidigh, "descendant of Head (ceann) + Ugly (éidigh) "
See Cape Canaveral. American politician. A U.S. senator from Massachusetts (since 1962), he has sponsored national health insurance legislation and been a longtime leader of the Democratic Party. The 35th President of the United States (1961-1963). A U.S. representative (1947-1953) and senator (1953-1960) from Massachusetts, he became the youngest man elected to the presidency (1960). Kennedy approved the failed invasion of the Bay of Pigs (1961) and forced Khrushchev to remove Soviet missiles from Cuba (1962). He also established the Peace Corps (1961) and advocated civil rights reform. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963. American banker and industrialist who served as ambassador to Great Britain (1937-1940). With his wife, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy (1890-1995), he raised nine children, three of whom became prominent politicians. A peak, 4,241 m (13,905 ft) high, in the St. Elias Mountains of Yukon Territory, Canada, near the Alaskan border. Discovered in 1935, it was named for President John F. Kennedy and climbed for the first time in 1965. American politician who served as U.S. attorney general (1961-1964) during the presidency of his brother John F. Kennedy. He was elected to the Senate (1964) and was campaigning for the presidency when he was assassinated in Los Angeles. Edward Kennedy Ellington Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Kennedy Anthony McLeod Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy Kennedy John Fitzgerald Kennedy Joseph Patrick Kennedy Robert Francis Kennedy William Aimee Elizabeth Kennedy Onassis Jacqueline Kennedy President's Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy
{i} family name; Joseph Kennedy (1888-1969), , American businessman and diplomat, father of President John F. Kennedy and the head of the Kennedy political family; John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963), 35th president of the United States (1961-1963) who was was assassinated in Dallas (Texas) on November 22nd 1963; Robert Kennedy (1925-1968), American politician who was shot on June 4th 1968 and died on June 6th 1968; Edward "Ted" Kennedy (b.1932), American politician
a large airport on Long Island east of New York City
35th President of the United States; established the Peace Corps; assassinated in Dallas (1917-1963)
a large airport on Long Island east of New York City 35th President of the United States; established the Peace Corps; assassinated in Dallas (1917-1963)
echo
glamour
Kennedy Center
the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts a theatre built as the official memorial to President Kennedy, in Washington, D.C., where there are opera, ballet, and musical performances. Every year there is a special ceremony there, where prizes are given to singers, actors, dancers, musicians etc
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
Huge cultural complex (opened 1971) in Washington, D.C., with a total of six stages, designed by Edward Durell Stone. The complex, surfaced in marble, makes use of the ornamental facade screens for which the architect was known. The three main theaters are entered from the Grand Foyer, which faces the Potomac River. The Concert Hall, the largest auditorium, has been designated a national monument; its acoustics are considered exceptional, and its embossed ceiling and crystal chandeliers have been much admired
Kennedy Space Center
{i} main launch facility of NASA in the United States
Kennedy Space Center
the Kennedy Space Center a place in Florida where US spacecraft are built and sent into space
Anthony M Kennedy
born July 23, 1936, Sacramento, Calif., U.S. U.S. jurist. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he practiced law in San Francisco and Sacramento before being appointed to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 1975. He was nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1988 by Pres. Ronald Reagan. His record generally reflected his conservative outlook, and he consistently voted against policies such as affirmative action and abortion rights. His episodic departure from conservative jurisprudence stemmed from his civil libertarian perspective on certain individual rights
Anthony McLeod Kennedy
born July 23, 1936, Sacramento, Calif., U.S. U.S. jurist. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he practiced law in San Francisco and Sacramento before being appointed to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 1975. He was nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1988 by Pres. Ronald Reagan. His record generally reflected his conservative outlook, and he consistently voted against policies such as affirmative action and abortion rights. His episodic departure from conservative jurisprudence stemmed from his civil libertarian perspective on certain individual rights
Cape Kennedy
a former name of Cape Canaveral
Cape Kennedy
space center which is located in Florida (USA)
Carolyn Bessette Kennedy
{i} (1966-1999) United States publicist, wife of John F. Kennedy Jr. (killed along with John F. Kennedy and her sister, Lauren, when their private airplane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean)
Edward Kennedy
Ted" Kennedy (born 1932), American politician, member of the U.S. Senate from the Democratic Party, youngest brother of President John F. Kennedy
Edward M Kennedy
known as Ted Kennedy born Feb. 22, 1932, Brookline, Mass., U.S. U.S. senator. He is the youngest son of Joseph P. Kennedy and the brother of John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy. He graduated from Harvard University in 1956 and received a law degree from the University of Virginia in 1959. In 1962 he was elected to the former U.S. Senate seat of his brother John, who became president in 1960. Elected Democratic majority whip in 1969, he was considered a front-runner for the 1972 Democratic presidential nomination. In 1970 he was involved in a car accident on Chappaquiddick Island, near Martha's Vineyard, Mass., in which a companion in his car was drowned. Kennedy was found guilty of leaving the scene of an accident. Though he was reelected to the Senate in 1970, he decided against seeking the presidency in 1972. He won a third full term in 1976 and was again a serious contender for the Democratic nomination in 1980, but he withdrew during the convention. In subsequent years his presidential prospects were limited by memories of the Chappaquiddick incident and by his somewhat raffish personal life. In the 1980s and '90s he continued to represent Massachusetts in the Senate, where he was a forceful spokesman for liberal causes, including civil rights, consumer protection, and national health insurance
Edward Moore Kennedy
known as Ted Kennedy born Feb. 22, 1932, Brookline, Mass., U.S. U.S. senator. He is the youngest son of Joseph P. Kennedy and the brother of John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy. He graduated from Harvard University in 1956 and received a law degree from the University of Virginia in 1959. In 1962 he was elected to the former U.S. Senate seat of his brother John, who became president in 1960. Elected Democratic majority whip in 1969, he was considered a front-runner for the 1972 Democratic presidential nomination. In 1970 he was involved in a car accident on Chappaquiddick Island, near Martha's Vineyard, Mass., in which a companion in his car was drowned. Kennedy was found guilty of leaving the scene of an accident. Though he was reelected to the Senate in 1970, he decided against seeking the presidency in 1972. He won a third full term in 1976 and was again a serious contender for the Democratic nomination in 1980, but he withdrew during the convention. In subsequent years his presidential prospects were limited by memories of the Chappaquiddick incident and by his somewhat raffish personal life. In the 1980s and '90s he continued to represent Massachusetts in the Senate, where he was a forceful spokesman for liberal causes, including civil rights, consumer protection, and national health insurance
Jackie Kennedy
the wife of John F. Kennedy, who became very popular when she was the first lady of the US from 1961 to 1963 because she was considered very beautiful and fashionable. In 1968, five years after Kennedy's death, she married Aristotle Onassis (1929-94)
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis
orig. Jacqueline Bouvier born July 28, 1929, Southampton, N.Y., U.S. died May 19, 1994, New York, N.Y. U.S. first lady, socialite, and editor. After graduating from George Washington University in 1951 she took a job as a reporter-photographer at the Washington Times-Herald. In 1953 she married Sen. John F. Kennedy, who became president in 1961. As first lady, she restored the White House to its original Federal style and conducted a televised tour of the residence. Her graciousness, elegance, and beauty endeared her to the American public, and her broad culture and ease in speaking Spanish and French impressed foreign leaders. After her husband's assassination in 1963 she moved to New York with their children, Caroline (b. 1957) and John, Jr. (1960-99). In 1968 she married Aristotle Onassis. After his death in 1975, she returned to New York, where she became a book editor
John F Kennedy
born May 29, 1917, Brookline, Mass., U.S. died Nov. 22, 1963, Dallas, Texas 35th president of the U.S. (1961-63). The son of Joseph P. Kennedy, he graduated from Harvard University in 1940 and joined the navy the following year. He commanded a patrol torpedo (PT) boat in World War II and was gravely injured in an attack by a Japanese destroyer; he was later decorated for heroism. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1946 and the U.S. Senate in 1952, he supported social-welfare legislation and became increasingly committed to civil rights; in foreign affairs, he supported the Cold War policies of the Truman administration. In 1960 he won the Democratic nomination for president, beating out Lyndon B. Johnson, who became his running mate. In his acceptance speech Kennedy declared, "We stand on the edge of a New Frontier"; thereafter the phrase "New Frontier" was associated with his programs. After a vigorous campaign managed by his brother Robert F. Kennedy and aided financially by his father, he narrowly defeated the Republican candidate, Richard Nixon. He was the youngest person and the first Roman Catholic elected president. In his inaugural address he called on Americans to "ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." His legislative program, including massive income-tax cuts and a sweeping civil-rights measure, received little support in the Congress, though he did win approval of the Peace Corps and the Alliance for Progress. In 1961 he committed the U.S. to land a man on the Moon by the end of the decade. In foreign affairs he approved a plan drawn up during the Eisenhower administration to land an invasion force of Cuban exiles on their homeland, but the Bay of Pigs invasion (1961) was a fiasco. Determined to combat the spread of communism in Asia, he sent military advisers and other assistance to South Vietnam. During the Cuban missile crisis (1962) he imposed a naval blockade on Cuba and demanded that the Soviet Union remove its nuclear missiles from the island. In 1963 he successfully concluded the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty with Britain and the Soviet Union. In November 1963, while riding in a motorcade in Dallas, he was assassinated by a sniper, allegedly Lee Harvey Oswald. The killing is considered the most notorious political murder of the 20th century. Kennedy's youth, energy, and charming family brought him world adulation and sparked the idealism of a generation, for whom the Kennedy White House became known as "Camelot." Revelations about his powerful family and his personal life, especially concerning his extramarital affairs, tainted his image in later years. See also Jackie Kennedy Onassis
John F. Kennedy
{i} John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963), 35th president of the United States (1961-63), founder of many post-World War II economic and social reforms, president who gave final approval for the Bay of Pigs Invasion in Cuba, assassinated in Dallas (Texas) on November 22nd 1963
John F. Kennedy Jr.
(1960-1999) American lawyer and publisher (son of U.S. President John F. Kennedy) who was killed along with his wife and her sister when their private airplane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
{i} John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) ,35th president of the United States (1961-63), founder of many post-World War II economic and social reforms, president who gave final approval for the Bay of Pigs Invasion in Cuba, assassinated in Dallas (Texas) on November 22nd 1963
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
a US politician in the Democratic Party, also known as Jack Kennedy and JFK, who was President of the US from 1961 to 1963. He was an extremely popular president, and he planned to improve education, the system of medical care, and civil rights in the US, although it was Lyndon B. Johnson who achieved most of these plans after Kennedy's death. In 1961 Kennedy ordered the invasion of the Bay of Pigs in Cuba, and he was strongly criticized for this. Two years later he was shot in Dallas, Texas, and Lee Harvey Oswald was accused of killing him (1917-63). born May 29, 1917, Brookline, Mass., U.S. died Nov. 22, 1963, Dallas, Texas 35th president of the U.S. (1961-63). The son of Joseph P. Kennedy, he graduated from Harvard University in 1940 and joined the navy the following year. He commanded a patrol torpedo (PT) boat in World War II and was gravely injured in an attack by a Japanese destroyer; he was later decorated for heroism. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1946 and the U.S. Senate in 1952, he supported social-welfare legislation and became increasingly committed to civil rights; in foreign affairs, he supported the Cold War policies of the Truman administration. In 1960 he won the Democratic nomination for president, beating out Lyndon B. Johnson, who became his running mate. In his acceptance speech Kennedy declared, "We stand on the edge of a New Frontier"; thereafter the phrase "New Frontier" was associated with his programs. After a vigorous campaign managed by his brother Robert F. Kennedy and aided financially by his father, he narrowly defeated the Republican candidate, Richard Nixon. He was the youngest person and the first Roman Catholic elected president. In his inaugural address he called on Americans to "ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." His legislative program, including massive income-tax cuts and a sweeping civil-rights measure, received little support in the Congress, though he did win approval of the Peace Corps and the Alliance for Progress. In 1961 he committed the U.S. to land a man on the Moon by the end of the decade. In foreign affairs he approved a plan drawn up during the Eisenhower administration to land an invasion force of Cuban exiles on their homeland, but the Bay of Pigs invasion (1961) was a fiasco. Determined to combat the spread of communism in Asia, he sent military advisers and other assistance to South Vietnam. During the Cuban missile crisis (1962) he imposed a naval blockade on Cuba and demanded that the Soviet Union remove its nuclear missiles from the island. In 1963 he successfully concluded the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty with Britain and the Soviet Union. In November 1963, while riding in a motorcade in Dallas, he was assassinated by a sniper, allegedly Lee Harvey Oswald. The killing is considered the most notorious political murder of the 20th century. Kennedy's youth, energy, and charming family brought him world adulation and sparked the idealism of a generation, for whom the Kennedy White House became known as "Camelot." Revelations about his powerful family and his personal life, especially concerning his extramarital affairs, tainted his image in later years. See also Jackie Kennedy Onassis
John Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963), 35th president of the United States (1961-1963) who was was assassinated in Dallas (Texas) on November 22nd 1963
Joseph Kennedy
{i} Joseph "Joe" Patrick Kennedy, Sr. (1888-1969), American businessman and diplomat, father of President John F. Kennedy and the head of the Kennedy political family
Joseph P Kennedy
He became a shipbuilder, a motion-picture tycoon, and a large contributor to the Democratic Party. During the 1920s he acquired a large fortune by speculating in the stock market; he is also alleged to have traded in bootleg liquor during Prohibition. Later, as chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission (1934-35), he outlawed the speculative practices, including insider trading and stock manipulation, that had made him rich. He was the first Irish American to serve as ambassador to Britain (1937-40). With his wife, Rose, he encouraged academic and athletic competitiveness in his children and expected the boys in the family including John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy, and Edward Kennedy to pursue careers in public service. His role in John Kennedy's narrow victory over Richard Nixon in the 1960 presidential election has long been the subject of controversy
Joseph P Kennedy
born Sept. 6, 1888, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Nov. 18, 1969, Hyannis Port, Mass. U.S. businessman and financier. He graduated from Harvard University in 1912. He was a bank president by age 25 and a millionaire at age
Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr.
{i} Joseph Kennedy, Joseph "Joe" Patrick Kennedy, Sr. (1888-1969), American businessman and diplomat, father of President John F. Kennedy and the head of the Kennedy political family
Joseph Patrick Kennedy
He became a shipbuilder, a motion-picture tycoon, and a large contributor to the Democratic Party. During the 1920s he acquired a large fortune by speculating in the stock market; he is also alleged to have traded in bootleg liquor during Prohibition. Later, as chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission (1934-35), he outlawed the speculative practices, including insider trading and stock manipulation, that had made him rich. He was the first Irish American to serve as ambassador to Britain (1937-40). With his wife, Rose, he encouraged academic and athletic competitiveness in his children and expected the boys in the family including John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy, and Edward Kennedy to pursue careers in public service. His role in John Kennedy's narrow victory over Richard Nixon in the 1960 presidential election has long been the subject of controversy
Joseph Patrick Kennedy
born Sept. 6, 1888, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Nov. 18, 1969, Hyannis Port, Mass. U.S. businessman and financier. He graduated from Harvard University in 1912. He was a bank president by age 25 and a millionaire at age
Robert F Kennedy
born Nov. 20, 1925, Brookline, Mass., U.S. died June 6, 1968, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. politician. The son of Joseph P. Kennedy, he interrupted his education at Harvard University to serve in World War II; he was graduated from Harvard in 1948 and received a law degree from the University of Virginia in 1951. He managed the U.S. Senate campaign of his brother John F. Kennedy in 1952. In 1957 he became chief counsel to the Senate committee investigating labour racketeering; he resigned the post in 1960 to manage his brother's presidential campaign. As U.S. attorney general (1961-64), he led a drive against organized crime that resulted in the conviction of labour leader Jimmy Hoffa. In 1964 he was elected to the U.S. Senate from New York. He became a spokesman for liberal Democrats and a critic of the Vietnam policy of Lyndon B. Johnson. In 1968, while campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination in Los Angeles, he was assassinated by Sirhan Sirhan, a Palestinian immigrant
Robert Francis Kennedy
a US politician in the Democratic Party who was the brother of John F. Kennedy. He became a senator for New York in 1965. In 1968, when he was trying to become elected President of the US, he was shot (1925-68). born Nov. 20, 1925, Brookline, Mass., U.S. died June 6, 1968, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. politician. The son of Joseph P. Kennedy, he interrupted his education at Harvard University to serve in World War II; he was graduated from Harvard in 1948 and received a law degree from the University of Virginia in 1951. He managed the U.S. Senate campaign of his brother John F. Kennedy in 1952. In 1957 he became chief counsel to the Senate committee investigating labour racketeering; he resigned the post in 1960 to manage his brother's presidential campaign. As U.S. attorney general (1961-64), he led a drive against organized crime that resulted in the conviction of labour leader Jimmy Hoffa. In 1964 he was elected to the U.S. Senate from New York. He became a spokesman for liberal Democrats and a critic of the Vietnam policy of Lyndon B. Johnson. In 1968, while campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination in Los Angeles, he was assassinated by Sirhan Sirhan, a Palestinian immigrant
Ted Kennedy
Edward "Ted" Kennedy (born 1932), American politician, member of the U.S. Senate from the Democratic Party, youngest brother of President John F. Kennedy
William Kennedy
born Jan. 16, 1928, Albany, N.Y., U.S. U.S. novelist and journalist. He worked as a journalist in New York and Puerto Rico before returning in 1963 to his native Albany, N.Y., which he considered the source of his literary inspiration. His novels, which are set in Albany and contain elements of local history and the supernatural, include The Ink Truck (1969), Legs (1975), Billy Phelan's Greatest Game (1978), and Ironweed (1983, Pulitzer Prize; film, 1987)
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kennedy

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    /ˈkenədē/ /ˈkɛnədiː/

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    [ 'ke-n&-dE ] (biographical name.) Derived from the Gaelic Ó Ceannéidigh, "descendant of Head (ceann) + Ugly (éidigh) ".

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    ... that can affect the lives of millions of people?  Now John Kennedy was not a typical Harvard ...
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