tunneling

listen to the pronunciation of tunneling
Englisch - Türkisch
tünel kazma
tünelleme
(Madencilik) tünel açma
tunnel
{i} tünel

Bu tünel onun iki katı kadar uzundur. - This tunnel is twice as long as that one.

Tren tünelden uğuldadı. - The train roared through the tunnel.

tunneling 
(Coğrafya) tünel açma
tunneling man
(İnşaat) tünel işçisi
tunneling method
(Madencilik) tünel açma yöntemi
tunneling quality indeks
tünel açma nitelik indeksi
tunneling shield
(İnşaat) tünel ilerleme siperi
tunneling work
(Madencilik) tünel açma çalışması
tunnel
yeraltı geçidi
tunnel
tünel yapmak
tunnel
dehliz
tunnel
tünel açmak
tunnel
{f} tünelle

Kudüs, tüneller ve alt geçitler kentidir. - Jerusalem is a city of tunnels and underpasses.

Onlar düşman saldırısına karşı koymak için millerce yeraltı tünelleri kazdılar. - They dug miles of underground tunnels to resist the enemy attack.

scanning tunneling microscope
mikroskop tünel tarama
tunnel
(fiil) tünel açmak
tunnel
yeraltı maden ocağının yatay yolu
tunnel
içgeçit
tunnel
yeraltı yolu
tunnel
{f} tünel aç
tunnel
{i} galeri (maden)
tunnel
yeraltında yol veya geçit açmak
tunnel
transistör gibi amplifikatör
tunnel
tunnel diode elek
tunnel
(Tıp) Kapalı yol, tünel
tunnel
tunnel disease bends
Englisch - Englisch
Present participle of tunnel
the quantum mechanical passing of a particle through an energy barrier
the practice of exploring tunnel
the act of burrowing a tunnel
In quantum mechanics, the passing of a particle through a seemingly impenetrable barrier without a cause that is explainable by classical physics
v. or barrier penetration In physics, the passage of a particle through a seemingly impassable energy barrier. Though a particle's energy may be too low to surmount a barrier in classical physics, the particle may still cross the barrier as a consequence of its quantum-mechanical wave properties. An important application of this phenomenon is in the operation of the scanning tunneling microscope
When incomplete bonding causes releasing from the substrate and long areas of the flooring form tunnel-like deformities, usually over underlayment joints Tunnels are normally caused by movement of the underlayment joints from moisture growth and are sometimes combined with product growth
A VPN can be created by using "tunneling " Tunneling is a technology that allows a network transport protocol to carry information for other protocols within its own packets For example, IPX data packets can be encapsulated in IP packets for transport across the Internet, which isn't normally possible The packets are delivered unmodified to a remote device that has been setup to handle them The packets maybe secured using data encryption, authentication or integrity functions
Two similar networks connected through a different type of network can logically communicate through the heterogeneous network using multi protocol routers
A method for circumventing a firewall by hiding a message that would be rejected by the firewall inside a second, acceptable message
An important concept in the design of many kinds of networks: taking some protocol-family's ability to move packets from user to user, or to open virtual-circuits between users, and use this as if it were a data-link protocol to run another protocol family's upper layers (or even the same protocol family's upper layers) Examples: running TCP/IP over AppleTalk instead of something like Ethernet; running AppleTalk over DECNet instead of something like Localtalk or Ethernet
The act of transmitting data formed with one protocol within the structures of another protocol, allowing the data to be sent in the prevailing format of a network (usually IP) Examples of tunneling used in VPNs include L2TP and Microsoft’s PPTP
A technique of encapsulating one protocol within another, such as IPX with IP In the context of security, it refers to encrypting IP within IP so that the traffic may be routed securely
Drilling or trenching for the placement of underground passages for utility lines, subways, trains, roads, or other uses Tunnels can cause a diminution in value if the market perceives that they may not be structurally sound or may fail in the event of a seismic event, such as an earthquake
Also called a 'run' When the cigar burns faster on one side than it does the other Turn the cigar as you smoke to prevent it from happening
A technology used by VPNs to encapsulate, encrypt, and transmit data over the Internet infrastructure, enabling business partners to exchange information in a secured, private manner between organizational firewalls
A classical particle or system could not penetrate regions in which its energy would be negative, that is, barrier regions in which the °potential energy is greater than the system energy In the real world, however, a °wave function of significant amplitude may extend into and beyond such a region If the wave function extends into another region of positive energy, the barrier is crossed with some probability; this process is termed tunneling (since the barrier is penetrated rather than climbed)
Tunneling is a way to channel communications between a server and a remote user Secure methods of tunneling involve encryption
Architecture providing the services necessary to implement any standard point-to-point data encapsulation scheme
A quantum-mechanical effect causing particles to pass through an energy barrier without having the energy normally associated with that barrier In the context of transistors, electron tunneling has been observed across opens in metal lines, causing logic gates to function at low frequencies but fail at high frequencies
scanning tunneling microscope
A device used to form an image of the surface of a conductor or semiconductor with atomic resolution
scanning tunneling microscopes
plural form of scanning tunneling microscope
tunnel
A passage through or under some obstacle

But very soon he grew to like it, for the Boy used to talk to him, and made nice tunnels for him under the bedclothes that he said were like the burrows the real rabbits lived in.

tunnel
A hole in the ground made by an animal, a burrow
tunnel
An underground or underwater passage
tunnel
To make a tunnel
tunnel
{v} to form like a tunnel, catch, net, fill
tunnel
{n} a funnel, part of a chimney, wide net
Point to Point Tunneling Protocol
protocol that enables the transfer of data packets of TCP/IP through a foreign network that is not based on these protocols (by marking the packet with an address suited to the foreign network)
scanning tunneling microscope
A microscope that scans the surface of a sample with a beam of electrons, causing a narrow channel of tunneling electrons to flow between the sample and the beam, and producing three-dimensional images of atomic topography and structure
tunnel
An artificial passage or archway for conducting canals or railroads under elevated ground, for the formation of roads under rivers or canals, and the construction of sewers, drains, and the like
tunnel
a passageway through or under something, usually underground (especially one for trains or cars); "the tunnel reduced congestion at that intersection"
tunnel
A secure encrypted connection between two points through a public or third-party network
tunnel
When a canal passes through the ground (e g under a hill)
tunnel
A secure communication path between two peers, such as a client and a router
tunnel
{f} dig a tubular passage, create a tunnel
tunnel
An underground or underwater passage A 1-D basic feature
tunnel
a tunnel used to carry a roadway through a mountain or under a river instead of around or over those obstacles Tunnels can be very expensive to construct and maintain due to drilling and ventilation requirements Generally, most tunnels are located in mountainous or hilly regions, and examples include the Fort Pitt Tunnel (Interstate 279) in Pittsburgh and the Waldo Tunnel (U S 101) north of San Francisco
tunnel
tun·nel tunnels tunnelling tunnelled in AM, use tunneling, tunneled
tunnel
To catch in a tunnel net
tunnel
(n ) biSta, bihshtah
tunnel
A horizontal adit; any drift or crosscut in a mine that is open at one end
tunnel
A vessel with a broad mouth at one end, a pipe or tube at the other, for conveying liquor, fluids, etc
tunnel
1 the space or channel between the bottom of the hull center section, or main hull, and the sponson inner walls and air traps, in which air flow is directed and compressed by the boat's forward motion, generating a high- pressure air cushion to partially support the weight of the boat
tunnel
In the context of this document, a tunnel refers to a secure communication path between two peers, such as two PIX Firewall units It does not refer to using IPSec in tunnel mode
tunnel
Short off the shoulder sleeve
tunnel
a funnel
tunnel
To form into a tunnel, or funnel, or to form like a tunnel; as, to tunnel fibrous plants into nests
tunnel
A tunnel is a long passage which has been made under the ground, usually through a hill or under the sea. two new railway tunnels through the Alps
tunnel
The channel formed by the bottom of the main hull and the inner walls of a sponson
tunnel
a hole in the ground made by an animal for shelter
tunnel
- the horizontal excavation On the Nancy Creek Tunnel, the main tunnel extends 43,700 feet from the Johnson Ferry Road shaft to the RM Clayton shaft Along the alignment, the depth of the tunnel ranges from 95 to 330 feet Only about 800 feet of the 43,700-foot length will be excavated by drilling and blasting (400 foot long TBM starter tunnels at the RM Clayton and Roswell Road shafts) The remaining length will be excavated using TBMs
tunnel
To make a tunnel through or under something, to burrow
tunnel
a large, underground structure used to store and transport wastewater, combined sewage or storm water during rain storms Tunnels usually have higher storage capacities than basins and are capable of transporting their flows directly to a wastewater treatment plant
tunnel
1 A structure, installation, or facility incorporating apparatus to simulate flight conditions in one way or another, specially designed for testing or experimenting with power plants, or with aircraft, rockets, or other aerodynamically designed bodies, engine installations, or models; specifically, a wind tunnel
tunnel
The opening of a chimney for the passage of smoke; a flue; a funnel
tunnel
a natural sub-surface cavity, formed by runoff flowing downslope through subsoil after heavy rain
tunnel
In mining, a lateral or horizontal passage underground intended to reach the vein or mineral deposit, where a drift may begin
tunnel
{i} hollow underground passage; protected conveyance conduit through a mountain or under a body of water
tunnel
into casks, bottles, or other vessels; a funnel
tunnel
an underground passage, open to daylight at both ends
tunnel
A level passage driven across the measures, or at right angles to veins which it is desired to reach; distinguished from the drift, or gangway, which is led along the vein when reached by the tunnel
tunnel
The intermediate program, which works as the retranslator between two objects The tunnel Is closed, when both sides, joint by it, interrupt session The tunnel can be activated by HTTP-request
tunnel
To tunnel somewhere means to make a tunnel there. The rebels tunnelled out of a maximum security jail see also wind tunnel. Horizontal or nearly horizontal underground or underwater passageway. Tunnels are used for mining, as passageways for trains and motor vehicles, for diverting rivers around damsites, for housing underground installations such as power plants, and for conducting water. Ancient civilizations used tunnels to carry water for irrigation and drinking, and in the 22nd century BC the Babylonians built a tunnel for pedestrian traffic under the Euphrates River. The Romans built aqueduct tunnels through mountains by heating the rock face with fire and rapidly cooling it with water, causing the rock to crack. The introduction of gunpowder blasting in the 17th century marked a great advance in solid-rock excavation. For softer soils, excavation is accomplished using devices such as the tunneling mole, with its rotating wheel that continuously excavates material and loads it onto a conveyor belt. Railroad transportation in the 19th-20th century led to a tremendous expansion in the number and length of tunnels. Brick and stone were used for support in early tunnels, but in modern tunneling steel is generally used until a concrete lining can be installed. A common method of lining involves spraying shotcrete onto the tunnel crown immediately after excavation. carpal tunnel syndrome Channel Tunnel wind tunnel
tunnel
To make an opening, or a passageway, through or under; as, to tunnel a mountain; to tunnel a river
tunnel
Loosely applied to any horizontal shaft but a tunnel must be open to the air at both ends; an adit is open to the air at one end, if it were continued completely through a hill, it would be a tunnel
tunnel
move through by or as by digging; "burrow through the forest"
tunnel
force a way through
tunneling
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