timothy

listen to the pronunciation of timothy
Englisch - Türkisch
fleol
{i} aziz Paulus'un öğrencisi (İncil)
(isim) aziz Paulus'un öğrencisi (İncil)
çayır ot
bir çeşit çayır otu
Phleum pratense
timothy grass
(Botanik, Bitkibilim) çayırotu
Englisch - Englisch
A companion of Paul
A male given name of biblical origin, also borne by early Christian saints
Books in the New Testament of the Bible (1 Timothy and 2 Timothy), epistles to Timothy
any of several grasses, of the genus Phleum, native to Europe and Asia, widely cultivated as a fodder plant
Christian leader and companion of Saint Paul. Two epistles of the New Testament, ascribed to Paul, are addressed to him. Perennial grass (Phleum pratense) of the family Poaceae (or Gramineae), native to Europe and widely cultivated as a hay and pasture grass in North America. The stems grow in large clumps, are 1.5-3 ft (0.5-1 m) tall, and have swollen, bulblike bases. The flower clusters are long, dense, and cylindrical. Alpine, or mountain, timothy (P. alpinum) is about half as tall and occurs in wet areas from Greenland to Alaska, and at high altitudes in many other parts of North America and Europe. Healy Timothy Michael Hunt R. Timothy O'Sullivan Timothy H. Pickering Timothy
of biblical origin, also borne by early Christian saints
{i} male first name; disciple of the Apostle Paul (Christianity)
a disciple of Saint Paul who became the leader of the Christian community at Ephesus
a grass grown for hay a disciple of Saint Paul who became the leader of the Christian community at Ephesus grass with long cylindrical spikes frown in northern United States and Europe for hay
It is much prized for fodder
A kind of grass (Phleum pratense) with long cylindrical spikes; called also herd's grass, in England, cat's-tail grass, and meadow cat's-tail grass
See Illustration in Appendix
a grass grown for hay
grass with long cylindrical spikes frown in northern United States and Europe for hay
{i} variety of grass that produces a central flower spike (cultivated for hay)
Tim
Timothy Dalton
(born 1946) British actor, star of the James Bond films "The Living Daylights" and "License to Kill
Timothy H. O'Sullivan
born 1840, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 14, 1882, Staten Island, N.Y. U.S. photographer. He learned photography in Mathew B. Brady's studio in New York City, and during the American Civil War he photographed on many fronts as one of Brady's team. Perhaps his best-known picture is Harvest of Death (1863), showing Confederate dead at Gettysburg. O'Sullivan left Brady's employ over the issue of receiving proper credit for his work. After the war O'Sullivan often portrayed vast landscapes. He took part in surveys in Panama as well as in the western and southwestern U.S. and was appointed chief photographer for the Treasury Department in 1880
Timothy McVeigh
a US man who was accused of exploding a bomb in front of a government building in Oklahoma City in 1996. More than 160 people were killed by the explosion. A court found him guilty of this crime in 1997, and sentenced him to death. He was killed in 2001 (1968-2001)
Timothy Michael Healy
born May 17, 1855, Bantry, County Cork, Ire. died March 26, 1931, Dublin Irish political leader. Soon after he entered Parliament in 1880, the "Healy Clause" of the Land Act of 1881, protecting tenant farmers' agrarian improvements from rent increases, made him popular in Ireland. Long associated with Charles Stewart Parnell, he broke with him in 1886. He grew dissatisfied with both the Liberals and the Irish Nationalists in the wake of the 1916 Easter Rising, and after 1917 he supported Sinn Féin. He was supported by both the British and Irish ministries as governor-general (1922-28) of the new Irish Free State
Timothy Pickering
born July 17, 1745, Salem, Mass. died Jan. 29, 1829, Salem, Mass., U.S. U.S. politician. He joined the militia in 1766 and served in the American Revolution under George Washington, becoming adjutant general (1777-78) and quartermaster general (1780-85). He later served as U.S. postmaster general (1791-95), secretary of war (1795), and secretary of state (1795-1800). He served in the U.S. Senate from 1803 to 1811 and in the House of Representatives from 1813 to 1817. A leader of the Federalist Party, he was a member of the Essex Junto, and he opposed the War of 1812. After retiring from politics, he turned to experimental farming and education
timothy grass
A kind of grass (Phleum pratense) with long cylindrical spikes; called also herd's grass, in England, cat's-tail grass, and meadow cat's-tail grass
timothy grass
It is much prized for fodder
timothy grass
See Illustration in Appendix
1 Timothy
A book in the New Testament of the Bible, the first epistle to Timothy
2 Timothy
A book in the New Testament of the Bible, the second epistle to Timothy
R. Timothy Hunt
born Feb. 19, 1943, Neston, Cheshire, Eng. British scientist. After receiving a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 1968, he conducted research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and in 1990 joined the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK) in London. In the early 1980s, using sea urchins, he discovered cyclins, proteins that play a key role in regulating different phases of the cell cycle. His work led to the discovery of cyclins in humans and proved important in the field of tumour diagnostics. Hunt shared a Nobel Prize with Leland H. Hartwell and Sir Paul M. Nurse in 2001
first epistle of paul the apostle to timothy
a New Testament book containing Saint Paul's first epistle to Timothy; contains advice on pastoral matters
second epistle of paul the apostle to timothy
a New Testament book containing Saint Paul's second epistle to Timothy; contains advice on pastoral matters
timothy

    Silbentrennung

    Ti·mo·thy

    Türkische aussprache

    tîmıthi

    Aussprache

    /ˈtəməᴛʜē/ /ˈtɪməθiː/

    Etymologie

    [ 'ti-m&-thE ] (noun.) 1747. From Ancient Greek Τιμόθεος (Timotheos) from τιμάω (timaō, “I honour”) + θεός (theos, “god”)

    Wort des Tages

    obsequious
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