temples

listen to the pronunciation of temples
Englisch - Türkisch
tapınaklar

Yarın bazı tapınakları ziyaret edelim. - Let's visit some temples tomorrow.

Bizim aramızda doğayla ilgili olanlar hariç tapınaklar ve türbeler yoktu, . - There were no temples or shrines among us save those of nature.

temple
{i} tapınak

Bu şimdiye kadar gördüğüm en büyük tapınaktır. - This is the largest temple that I've ever seen.

Bu tapınak ne zaman inşa edildi. - When was this temple built?

temple
{i} şakak

Tom parmaklarıyla şakaklarını masaj yapar. - Tom massages his temples with his fingers.

Tom parmaklarıyla şakaklarıma masaj yaptı. - Tom massaged my temples with his fingers.

temple
{i} sinagog
temple
kumaşı tezgâhta gergin tutan ağaç
temple
(Teknik,Tekstil) enine açıcı
temple
çımbar
temple
cımbar
temple
{i} ibadethane
temple
{i} mabet
temple
şakak/tapınak
temple
(Tıp) Şakak, tempora
temple
kumaşı tezgâhta gergin tutmaya mahsus ağaç parças
temple
mabed
temple
tapınağı
Englisch - Englisch
plural of temple
temple
The slightly flatter region, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear
temple
a body

Grows wide withal.

temple
The Jewish temple of Jerusalem, first built by Solomon
temple
Either of the sidepieces on a set of spectacles, extending backwards from the hinge toward the ears and, usually, turning down around them
temple
A building for worship

A temple of Zeus..

temple
Sometimes used to describe a protestant church in French-speaking nations
temple
Something regarded as holding religious presence
temple
Something of importance; something attended to

My body is my temple.

temple
The central place of Jewish worship David wanted a "house for God's Tabernacle" and his son Solomon build the first temple Rebuild Temple - After the 70 years in Exile the temple was rebuild but not in it original splendor
temple
   a place of worship The Temple in Hebrew religion was a permanent structure in Jerusalem, built by Solomon as a substitute for the tent of worship that the Israelites had used in the wilderness and continued to use through David's reign This temple was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587- 86 B C A second Temple was constructed under Ezra and Nehemiah in the fifth century, after the return from the Exile See Second Temple
temple
1)A building set aside for worship 2)Used figuratively as a believers body
temple
The 2 "arms" that go over the wearers ears
temple
Side pieces of an eyeglass frame that hook over or behind the ear to hold the glasses firmly in place See Free Eye Tests
temple
Place of worship
temple
{n} a church, building, side of the head
temple
place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes the flat area on either side of the forehead; "the veins in his temple throbbed
temple
A building dedicated to the administration of ordinances
temple
place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity
temple
A "house" in the form of a building or complex of buildings dedicated to a particular god or goddess Within the temple was a shrine with an image of the god which priests tendered to every day The cults of some gods became very powerful and their temple administrations sometimes amassed great wealth
temple
One of the side bars of a pair of spectacles, jointed to the bows, and passing one on either side of the head to hold the spectacles in place
temple
A temple is a building used for the worship of a god or gods, especially in the Buddhist and Hindu religions, and in ancient Greek and Roman times. a small Hindu temple. the Temple of Diana at Ephesus
temple
Set at the fell of the cloth, it keeps the newly woven material at the correct width so that the warp and the filling in the weaving will interlace at right angles to form proper width fabric Also known as tempet, stretcher, and tenter hook
temple
To build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to; as, to temple a god
temple
{i} place of worship, shrine, church, synagogue; flattened region on either side of the forehead
temple
The ancient Greek structure built to shelter the god statue, and the focus of religious worship Thus, the Parthenon in Athens is the structure that was built to shelter the 40 foot tall ivory and gold statue of Athena Parthenos
temple
A place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity; as, the temple of Jupiter at Athens, or of Juggernaut in India
temple
Building dedicated for religious worship
temple
The holy place of worship in Jerusalem which replaced Moses Wilderness Tabernacle on land purchased for it by King David, and originally built by Solomon In Reform Judaism, this word can also mean synagogue
temple
Your temples are the flat parts on each side of the front part of your head, near your forehead. Threads of silver ran through his beard and the hair at his temples. A city of central Texas south of Fort Worth. It is a processing and manufacturing center. Population: 46,109. See Shirley Temple Black. an area in central London which contains the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, two parts of the Inns of Court. Many lawyers and barristers work there. Edifice constructed for the worship of a deity. Features commonly include a sanctuary and an al(Tarih) Ancient Egypt had two kinds of temple: mortuary temples for the cults of dead kings, with a chapel in which offerings were presented, and cult temples that held images of deities. The cult temple typically included a massive pylon entrance with a court leading to a hypostyle hall and, at the heart of the temple, a shrine for the cult image. Most Classical Greek temples were rectangular and built of marble or other stone on a low stylobate (stepped platform). A gable roof was supported by columns, with a portico at each end (amphiprostyle temple), a colonnade extending all around (peripteral temple), or a double line of columns all around (dipteral temple). An inner cella housed the image of a deity, and an altar stood outside the temple. Roman temples were profoundly influenced by Greek style, but the altar was inside the temple and the colonnade was often reduced to a row of engaged columns. Hindu temples vary regionally, but generally consist of a towering shrine and a columned hall surrounded by an elaborate wall. Buddhist temples range from half-buried sanctuaries with richly carved entrances to single carved towers or statues. The Chinese and Japanese Buddhist temple is typically a one-story building of richly carved, painted, or tiled timber constructed around an atrium used for worship, though towering pagodas were sometimes built as temples over a shrine. In the Americas, Inca and Mayan temples were constructed of stone, often richly carved; they were generally stair-stepped pyramids, with the shrine at the top. See also synagogue. Golden Temple Horyu Temple Jerusalem Temple of Ryoan Temple Shore Temple Temple of Heaven Temple Shirley Shirley Temple Black Temple Sir William Todai Temple Palmerston of Palmerston Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount
temple
(Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation
temple
Fig
temple
The region of the skull on either side of the forehead
temple
Any place in which the divine presence specially resides
temple
The Israelite or Jewish temple to Yhwh, found in Jerusalem, and destroyed both in 587 BCE and (finally) in 70 CE
temple
first used of the tabernacle, which is called "the temple of the Lord" (1 Sam 1: 9) In the New Testament the word is used figuratively of Christ's human body (John 2: 19, 21) Believers are called "the temple of God" (1 Cor 3: 16, 17) The Church is designated "an holy temple in the Lord" (Eph 2: 21) Heaven is also called a temple (Rev 7: 5) We read also of the heathen "temple of the great goddess Diana" (Acts 19: 27)
temple
A place of worship; in the ancient world, temples were the centers of outward religious life, places at which public religious observances were normally conducted by the priestly professionals; in Israel there were many temples in various locations, but the temple in Jerusalem built by Solomon eventually became the central and only authorized place to worship Yahweh; first built by king Solomon around 950 B C E , it was destroyed by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar in 587 B C E , and rebuilt about 70 years later; it was destroyed by the Romans in 70 C E ; the site of the ancient Jewish Temple is now occupied, in part, by the golden domed Mosque of Omar; in recent times, "temple" has come to be used synonymously with synagogue in some Jewish usage See Chapter 9
temple
an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes
temple
The "arm" of a pair of glasses, running from the ear to the lens area
temple
(stretcher) Adjustable wooden or metal bar with sharp points placed on the woven web to keep the width constant and the sett the same across the web To see a photo of a temple, go to temple
temple
The building used by people for religious worship
temple
A local organization of Odd Fellows
temple
The edifice erected at Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah
temple
~ The central place of worship in ancient Jerusalem The first temple was destroyed in 586 B C E The second was destroyed in 70 C E
temple
Hence, among Christians, an edifice erected as a place of public worship; a church
temple
The space, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear
temple
the flat area on either side of the forehead; "the veins in his temple throbbed"
temple
A contrivence used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely
temple
pura
temples

    Türkische aussprache

    tempılz

    Aussprache

    /ˈtempəlz/ /ˈtɛmpəlz/

    Etymologie

    [ 'tem-p&l ] (noun.) before 12th century. Middle English, from Old English and Old French; Old English tempel and Old French temple, both from Latin templum space marked out for observation of auguries, temple, small timber; probably akin to Greek temenos sacred precinct, temnein to cut; more at.

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