push up

listen to the pronunciation of push up
Englisch - Türkisch
yukarı itmek
(Spor) şınav çekmek
artırmak
yukarı sürmek
fiyatları yukarı çekmek
şınav

Çavuş ere şınav çekmesini emretti. - The sergeant ordered the private to do push ups.

artırmak, yükseltmek
yükseltmek (fiyat)
pushup
şınav

Günde otuz şınav yaparım. - I do thirty pushups a day.

Vin Diesel şınav çekerken kendini yukarıya çekmez, dünyayı aşağıya iter. - When Vin Diesel does pushups, he's not pushing himself up - he's pushing the Earth down.

pushup
(Spor) şınav çekmek
push ups
sınav
push-up
(Spor) sınav
push-up
(Spor) Baskı, rakibi sıkıştırma
pushup
sınav
pushup
yüzükoyun yatarak vücudu esnetme hareketi
Englisch - Englisch
push upward; "The front of the trains that had collided head-on thrust up into the air"
push upward
{f} apply force in an upward direction, thrust
An exercise done to improve upper body strength, performed by resting on one's toes and hands and pushing one's weight off the floor
{i} exercise in which a person rests face down in a horizontal position with his palms flat on the floor beneath his shoulders and then raises and lowers his body by straightening and bending the arms
{s} having specially padded cups which lift the breasts and make them appear larger (about a brassiere)
Push-ups are exercises to strengthen your arms and chest muscles. They are done by lying with your face towards the floor and pushing with your hands to raise your body until your arms are straight
pushup
{i} exercise in which one rests on the belly and lifts the body by straightening the arms
pushup
A form of physical exercise in which a person lays face down, with the palms on the floor, and pushes the body up and down using the arms
pushup
an arm exercise performed lying face to the floor and pushing the body up and down with the arms
push up

    Türkische aussprache

    pûş ʌp

    Aussprache

    /ˈpo͝osʜ ˈəp/ /ˈpʊʃ ˈʌp/

    Etymologie

    [ 'push ] (verb.) 13th century. Middle English pusshen, from Middle French poulser to beat, push, from Old French, from Latin pulsare, frequentative of pellere to drive, strike; more at FELT.

    Wort des Tages

    alfresco
Favoriten