howard

listen to the pronunciation of howard
Englisch - Englisch
A patronymic surname
A male given name, transferred back from the surname. Short form: Howie
An English surname
Short form: Howie
{i} male first name; family name; Leslie Howard (1893-1943), British actor, co-star of Vivian Leigh in "Gone With the Wind
Queen of England as the fifth wife of Henry VIII (1540-1542). She was accused of adultery and subsequently executed. English poet and soldier remembered for his sonnets and his translations of two books of Virgil's Aeneid. In 1547 he was falsely charged with treason and executed. Aiken Howard Hathaway Armstrong Edwin Howard Bearden Romare Howard Bliss Tasker Howard Hoagland Howard Carmichael Catherine Howard Dietz Howard Florey Howard Walter Baron Hanson Howard Harold Hawks Howard Winchester Howard family Howard University Howard John Winston Howard Leslie Leslie Howard Steiner Howard Oliver Otis Howard Ron Hughes Howard Robard Lindsay Howard Mays Willie Howard Meredith James Howard Nemerov Howard Norfolk Thomas Howard 2nd duke of Norfolk Thomas Howard 3rd duke of Norfolk Thomas Howard 4th duke of Northampton Henry Howard earl of Northrop John Howard Odum Howard Washington Ricketts Howard Taylor Schuman William Howard Shaw Anna Howard Suffolk Thomas Howard 1st earl of Surrey Henry Howard earl of Susskind David Howard Taft William Howard Tormé Melvin Howard
Queen of England as the fifth wife of Henry VIII who was accused of adultery and executed (1520-1542)
Queen of England as the fifth wife of Henry VIII who was accused of adultery and executed (1520-1542) English actor of stage and screen (1893-1943)
English actor of stage and screen (1893-1943)
elemental
Howard Dietz
born Sept. 9, 1896, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 30, 1983, New York City U.S. songwriter. He studied at Columbia University and later joined an advertising agency, where he designed the trademark roaring lion for Goldwyn Pictures (later MGM). He joined the film studio in 1919 and became director of advertising, a post he held until 1957. From 1923 he wrote lyrics in his spare time. In 1929 he met the composer Arthur Schwartz (1900-84); the duo established their reputation with The Little Show and went on to write such Broadway shows as Three's a Crowd (1930), The Band Wagon (1931), and The Gay Life (1961). Dietz wrote about 500 songs; the Dietz-Schwartz collaborations include "Something to Remember You By," "Dancing in the Dark," and "You and the Night and the Music
Howard H Aiken
born March 9, 1900, Hoboken, N.J., U.S. died March 14, 1973, St. Louis, Mo. U.S. mathematician and inventor. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. With three other engineers, he began work in 1939 on an automatic calculating machine that could perform any selected sequence of five arithmetical operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and reference to previous results) without human intervention. The first such machine, the Harvard Mark I (1944), was 51 ft (15 m) long and 8 ft (2.4 m) high, and weighed 35 tons (31,500 kg)
Howard Hanson
born Oct. 28, 1896, Wahoo, Neb., U.S. died Feb. 26, 1981, New York, N.Y. U.S. composer, conductor, and educator. He was awarded the Rome Prize in 1921 and studied in Italy with Ottorino Respighi. Returning to the U.S., he became director of the Eastman School of Music (1924), and remained there 40 years, building the school into a world-renowned institution. Despite his keen scholarly interest in modern developments, his own music is neo-Romantic; he is best known for his seven symphonies including the second (Romantic) and fourth (Requiem, Pulitzer Prize) and his opera Merry Mount (1934)
Howard Harold Hanson
born Oct. 28, 1896, Wahoo, Neb., U.S. died Feb. 26, 1981, New York, N.Y. U.S. composer, conductor, and educator. He was awarded the Rome Prize in 1921 and studied in Italy with Ottorino Respighi. Returning to the U.S., he became director of the Eastman School of Music (1924), and remained there 40 years, building the school into a world-renowned institution. Despite his keen scholarly interest in modern developments, his own music is neo-Romantic; he is best known for his seven symphonies including the second (Romantic) and fourth (Requiem, Pulitzer Prize) and his opera Merry Mount (1934)
Howard Hathaway Aiken
born March 9, 1900, Hoboken, N.J., U.S. died March 14, 1973, St. Louis, Mo. U.S. mathematician and inventor. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. With three other engineers, he began work in 1939 on an automatic calculating machine that could perform any selected sequence of five arithmetical operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and reference to previous results) without human intervention. The first such machine, the Harvard Mark I (1944), was 51 ft (15 m) long and 8 ft (2.4 m) high, and weighed 35 tons (31,500 kg)
Howard Hawks
born May 30, 1896, Goshen, Ind., U.S. died Dec. 26, 1977, Palm Springs, Calif. U.S. film director, screenwriter, and producer. He served as a pilot in World War I, then wrote screenplays in Hollywood (from 1922) and directed several projects before making his first major film, A Girl in Every Port (1928). A master technician and storyteller, he created a sense of intimacy by filming from eye level. He directed over 40 films (many of which he also produced and wrote) in a variety of genres: adventure (The Dawn Patrol, 1930), crime (Scarface, 1932), comedy (Bringing Up Baby, 1938), war (Sergeant York, 1941), musicals (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953), film noir (The Big Sleep, 1946), science fiction (The Thing, 1951), and westerns (Red River, 1948; Rio Bravo, 1959)
Howard Hughes
{i} (1905-1976) famous United States aviator and movie producer who was a very wealthy industrialist
Howard Hughes
a US businessman, aircraft designer, pilot, and film producer, famous for being very rich but also for being very unwilling to spend money. He was a recluse (=someone who lives on their own and does not want to see other people) for the last 26 years of his life (1905-76). born Dec. 24, 1905, Houston, Texas, U.S. died April 5, 1976, in an airplane over southern Texas U.S. manufacturer, aviator, and movie producer. He left college at age 17 to take control of his late father's Hughes Tool Company, which owned the patent to an oil-drilling tool; the company would form the future basis for Hughes's vast fortune. In the early 1930s he founded Hughes Aircraft Company. In 1935 he set a speed record of 352 mph (567 km/hr) in a plane he designed. In 1938 he flew around the world in a record 91 hours. In 1947 he built and piloted the only flight of a wooden eight-engine flying boat unflatteringly nicknamed "the Spruce Goose." In the 1930s he produced several movies in Hollywood, and he owned RKO Pictures in the early 1950s. He held controlling stock in Trans World Airlines but was forced to sell it in 1966 following legal action. After about 1950 he became a famously eccentric recluse, and after his death his forged memoirs and his several wills became a source of scandal
Howard Johnson International
worldwide network of hotels and motels
Howard League for Penal Reform
a British organization which is against physical punishment and the death sentence, and wants change in international attitudes to punishment and imprisonment
Howard Lindsay
born March 29, 1889, Waterford, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 11, 1968, New York, N.Y. U.S. playwright, actor, and producer known for his collaboration with Russel Crouse (1893-1966). Lindsay began his career as an actor, director, and playwright, and Crouse was a journalist before they were paired by producer Vinton Freedley to write librettos for the successful Cole Porter musicals Anything Goes (1934) and Red, Hot and Blue (1936). Their most popular play, Life with Father (1939), ran for over seven years and starred Lindsay as Father. They produced Arsenic and Old Lace (1940) and later wrote librettos for musicals such as State of the Union (1945, Pulitzer Prize) and The Sound of Music (1959)
Howard Nemerov
born March 1, 1920, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 5, 1991, University City, near St. Louis, Mo. U.S. poet. He attended Harvard University and served as a pilot in World War II before teaching at various colleges, including Bennington. His verse, marked by irony and self-deprecatory wit, is often about nature; it appears in several volumes beginning with The Image and the Law (1947) and including Collected Poems (1977, Pulitzer Prize, National Book Award). His fiction includes The Homecoming Game (1957) and A Commodity of Dreams and Other Stories (1960). He was poet laureate of the U.S. (1988-90). His sister Diane Arbus was a notable photographer
Howard Robard Hughes
born Dec. 24, 1905, Houston, Texas, U.S. died April 5, 1976, in an airplane over southern Texas U.S. manufacturer, aviator, and movie producer. He left college at age 17 to take control of his late father's Hughes Tool Company, which owned the patent to an oil-drilling tool; the company would form the future basis for Hughes's vast fortune. In the early 1930s he founded Hughes Aircraft Company. In 1935 he set a speed record of 352 mph (567 km/hr) in a plane he designed. In 1938 he flew around the world in a record 91 hours. In 1947 he built and piloted the only flight of a wooden eight-engine flying boat unflatteringly nicknamed "the Spruce Goose." In the 1930s he produced several movies in Hollywood, and he owned RKO Pictures in the early 1950s. He held controlling stock in Trans World Airlines but was forced to sell it in 1966 following legal action. After about 1950 he became a famously eccentric recluse, and after his death his forged memoirs and his several wills became a source of scandal
Howard Robard Hughes, Jr.
{i} Howard Hughes (1905-1976), famous United States aviator and movie producer who was a very wealthy industrialist
Howard Stringer
{i} (born 1942) born in Wales (UK) and moved to the United States in 1965, Chairman and CEO of Sony Corporation worldwide, honored with knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II in January 2000, president of CBS Inc. from 1988 to 1995
Howard T Ricketts
born Feb. 9, 1871, Findlay, Ohio, U.S. died May 3, 1910, Mexico City, Mex. U.S. pathologist. He received his medical degree from Northwestern University. He discovered the bacterium (named rickettsia) that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever and epidemic typhus. He demonstrated in 1906 that the former could be transmitted by the bite of a certain tick and identified a bacterium in the blood of infected animals, in the ticks, and in their eggs. He found that epidemic typhus in Mexico was transmitted by a louse and found a related bacterium in the victim's blood and in the lice. He transmitted the disease to monkeys, which developed immunity. He died of typhus later that year
Howard Taylor Ricketts
born Feb. 9, 1871, Findlay, Ohio, U.S. died May 3, 1910, Mexico City, Mex. U.S. pathologist. He received his medical degree from Northwestern University. He discovered the bacterium (named rickettsia) that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever and epidemic typhus. He demonstrated in 1906 that the former could be transmitted by the bite of a certain tick and identified a bacterium in the blood of infected animals, in the ticks, and in their eggs. He found that epidemic typhus in Mexico was transmitted by a louse and found a related bacterium in the victim's blood and in the lice. He transmitted the disease to monkeys, which developed immunity. He died of typhus later that year
Howard University
historically African-American university located in Washington D.C. (USA)
Howard University
University in Washington, D.C., the most prominent African American educational institution in the U.S. It is financially supported by the U.S. government but is privately controlled. Though open to students of any ethnicity, it was founded (1867) with a special obligation to educate African American students. It has a college of liberal arts, a graduate school of arts and sciences, and schools or colleges of business and public administration, engineering, human ecology, medicine, dentistry, and law, among others. Its library is the leading research library on African American history
Howard W Odum
born May 24, 1884, near Bethlehem, Ga., U.S. died Nov. 8, 1954, Chapel Hill, N.C. U.S. sociologist. In 1920 Odum joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina, where he established its departments of sociology and public welfare and founded the journal Social Forces (1922). His scholarly focus was folk sociology, particularly of Southern blacks, for whom he urged equal opportunity. His books include Southern Regions of the United States (1936) and American Regionalism (1938, with Harry Moore)
Howard Walter Baron Florey
born Sept. 24, 1898, Adelaide, S.Aus., Austl. died Feb. 21, 1968, Oxford, Oxfordshire, Eng. Australian pathologist. Educated in Britain and the U.S., Florey taught at the University of Oxford from 1935. Investigating tissue inflammation and secretion of mucous membranes, he succeeded in purifying lysozyme, a bacteria-destroying enzyme found in tears and saliva, and characterized the substances it acted on. He surveyed other naturally occurring antibacterial substances, concentrating on penicillin, which he, with Ernst Boris Chain, isolated and purified for general clinical use. The two demonstrated penicillin's curative properties in human studies and developed methods for producing it in quantity. In 1945 he shared a Nobel Prize with Chain and Alexander Fleming, and in 1965 he was created a life peer
Howard Washington Odum
born May 24, 1884, near Bethlehem, Ga., U.S. died Nov. 8, 1954, Chapel Hill, N.C. U.S. sociologist. In 1920 Odum joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina, where he established its departments of sociology and public welfare and founded the journal Social Forces (1922). His scholarly focus was folk sociology, particularly of Southern blacks, for whom he urged equal opportunity. His books include Southern Regions of the United States (1936) and American Regionalism (1938, with Harry Moore)
Howard Winchester Hawks
born May 30, 1896, Goshen, Ind., U.S. died Dec. 26, 1977, Palm Springs, Calif. U.S. film director, screenwriter, and producer. He served as a pilot in World War I, then wrote screenplays in Hollywood (from 1922) and directed several projects before making his first major film, A Girl in Every Port (1928). A master technician and storyteller, he created a sense of intimacy by filming from eye level. He directed over 40 films (many of which he also produced and wrote) in a variety of genres: adventure (The Dawn Patrol, 1930), crime (Scarface, 1932), comedy (Bringing Up Baby, 1938), war (Sergeant York, 1941), musicals (Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953), film noir (The Big Sleep, 1946), science fiction (The Thing, 1951), and westerns (Red River, 1948; Rio Bravo, 1959)
Howard family
Famous English family, founded by William Howard, a lawyer in the county of Norfolk who was summoned to Parliament in 1295. The head of the Howard family, the duke of Norfolk, is the premier duke and hereditary earl marshal of England. The earls of Suffolk, Carlisle, and Effingham and Lord Howard of Glossop and Lord Stafford represent the family in its younger lines. Thomas Howard, 3rd duke of Norfolk, held high offices under Henry VIII, who married two of Howard's nieces, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard. The 4th duke of Norfolk was executed for intrigues against Elizabeth I, but Charles, 2nd Lord Howard of Effingham (1536-1624), was lord high admiral under Elizabeth and commanded the fleet that defeated the Spanish Armada. The family's Roman Catholicism kept it from prominence during certain periods
Anna Howard Shaw
born Feb. 14, 1847, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, Eng. died July 2, 1919, Moylan, Pa., U.S. U.S. minister and suffragist. She arrived in the U.S. with her family in 1851. By age 15 she was a frontier schoolteacher, and in 1880 she became the first woman minister of the Methodist Protestant Church. She took up the causes of temperance and woman suffrage in 1885 and became an important spokesperson for both. She earned a medical degree the next year and later served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (1904-15). She performed home-front war work during World War I, for which she received the Distinguished Service Medal in 1919. She died shortly before women gained the right to vote
Catherine Howard
born 1520 died Feb. 13, 1542, London, Eng. Fifth wife of Henry VIII of England. The granddaughter of the 2nd duke of Norfolk, she became a maid of honour to Anne of Cleves, Henry's fourth wife. After Henry had his marriage to Anne annulled, he married Catherine (1540). In 1541 he learned that Catherine had had several affairs before their marriage and that she also had probably committed adultery. Incensed, he had Parliament pass a bill in 1542 declaring it treason for an unchaste woman to marry the king. Catherine was beheaded two days later in the Tower of London
David Howard Susskind
born Dec. 19, 1920, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 22, 1987, New York City U.S. television producer and host. After being educated at the University of Wisconsin and Harvard University, he worked as a publicist before forming the agency Talent Associates in 1952. He produced numerous television programs, including Circle Theater (1955-63) and Dupont Show of the Month (1957-64), but he became best known as host of the talk shows Open End (1958-67) and The David Susskind Show (1967-86), for which he won many Emmy Awards. Open End began at 11: 00 PM and ran until the program's participants grew too tired to continue. Noted for his provocative discussions of controversial issues such as race relations, organized crime, and the Vietnam War, he also interviewed international leaders, notably Nikita Khrushchev (1960)
Edwin Howard Armstrong
born Dec. 18, 1890, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 31/Feb. 1, 1954, New York City U.S. inventor. He studied at Columbia University, where he devised a feedback circuit that brought in signals with a thousandfold amplification (1912). At its highest amplification, the circuit shifted from being a receiver to being a primary generator of radio waves, and as such it is at the heart of all radio and television broadcasting. It earned him the Franklin Medal, the highest U.S. scientific honour. His 1933 invention of circuits that produced the carrier waves for frequency modulation (FM) made high-fidelity broadcasting possible
Henry Howard earl of Northampton
born Feb. 25, 1540, Shottesham, Norfolk, Eng. died June 15, 1614, London English noble noted for his intrigues in the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. Younger brother of the 4th duke of Norfolk, he was implicated in efforts to free Mary, Queen of Scots. He successfully sought favour with the Scottish king James VI, who, on his accession as James I of England, made Howard a privy councillor (1603) and earl of Northampton (1604). As a judge at the trials of Walter Raleigh (1603) and Guy Fawkes (1605), he pressed for conviction
Henry Howard earl of Surrey
born 1517, Hunsdon, Hertfordshire, Eng.? died Jan. 13, 1547, London English poet. Because of his aristocratic birth and connections, Surrey was involved in the jockeying for place that accompanied Henry VIII's policies. After returning to England in 1546 from a campaign abroad, he was accused of treason by his rivals. After his sister admitted he was still a Roman Catholic, he was executed at age
Henry Howard earl of Surrey
Most of his poetry was published 10 years later. With Thomas Wyat, he introduced into England the styles and metres of the Italian humanist poets, laying the foundation of a great age in English poetry. He translated two books of Virgil's Aeneid, marking the first use in English of blank verse and was the first to develop the sonnet form used by William Shakespeare
James Howard Meredith
born June 25, 1933, Kosciusko, Miss., U.S. U.S. civil rights leader. He grew up in poverty in Mississippi, the most racially segregated state in the U.S. In 1961 he applied for admission to the all-white University of Mississippi. He won a legal battle to be admitted, but federal troops and Justice Department officials had to be brought in to enforce the court order. While participating in a voter-registration drive after his graduation from "Ole Miss," he was shot and wounded by a white supremacist
John Howard Northrop
born July 5, 1891, Yonkers, N.Y., U.S. died May 27, 1987, Wickenberg, Ariz. U.S. biochemist. He worked most of his career on the staff of New York City's Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research (1916-61). His early research on fermentation processes led to a study of enzymes essential for digestion, respiration, and general life processes. He established that enzymes obey the laws of chemical reactions, and he crystallized pepsin, trypsin, and chymotrypsin and their zymogens. With James Sumner and Wendell Meredith Stanley he shared a 1946 Nobel Prize
John Winston Howard
born July 26, 1939, Sydney, N.S.W., Austl. Prime minister of Australia (from 1996) and leader of the Liberal Party. Howard became a solicitor to the New South Wales Supreme Court. In 1974 he was elected to Parliament as a member of the Liberal Party and served under Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser as minister for business and consumer affairs (1975-77) and as federal treasurer (1977-83). Howard became leader of the Liberal Party in 1985, but, after failing to unseat the Labor Party in 1987, he was defeated in his bid to retain leadership in 1989. He regained power in 1995 and engineered the defeat of Labor in the elections of March 1996. He was reelected in 1998, 2001, and 2004
Leslie Howard
orig. Leslie Howard Steiner born April 3, 1893, London, Eng. died June 1, 1943, at sea British actor. He became a popular stage actor in London and later on Broadway, where he won acclaim for Her Cardboard Lover (1927), The Petrified Forest (1935), and Hamlet (1936). He was noted for his quiet, persuasive English charm. He made his U.S. film debut in Outward Bound (1930) and later starred in Of Human Bondage (1934), Pygmalion (1938), Intermezzo (1939), and Gone with the Wind (1939). He died during World War II (1939-45) when his plane was shot down en route from Lisbon to London
Oliver O Howard
born Nov. 8, 1830, Leeds, Maine, U.S. died Oct. 26, 1909, Burlington, Vt. U.S. Army officer. He graduated from West Point and served in the American Civil War as a major general of Maine volunteers, fighting at Bull Run, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. He commanded the Army of the Tennessee (1864) and marched with William T. Sherman through Georgia. During Reconstruction he was named commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. He helped found Howard University (1867), which was named in his honour, and served as its president (1869-74). He resigned to return to military service, fighting against the Indians (1877) and later serving as superintendent at West Point (1880-82)
Oliver Otis Howard
born Nov. 8, 1830, Leeds, Maine, U.S. died Oct. 26, 1909, Burlington, Vt. U.S. Army officer. He graduated from West Point and served in the American Civil War as a major general of Maine volunteers, fighting at Bull Run, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. He commanded the Army of the Tennessee (1864) and marched with William T. Sherman through Georgia. During Reconstruction he was named commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. He helped found Howard University (1867), which was named in his honour, and served as its president (1869-74). He resigned to return to military service, fighting against the Indians (1877) and later serving as superintendent at West Point (1880-82)
Romare Howard Bearden
born Sept. 2, 1914, Charlotte, N.C., U.S. died March 11, 1988, New York, N.Y. U.S. painter. He studied with George Grosz at the Art Students League and Columbia University. After military service in World War II, he attended the Sorbonne and traveled in Europe. During this time he achieved recognition for his complex, semiabstract collages of photographs and painted paper on canvas. The narrative structure of his work is clear; aspects of African American culture, including ritual, music, and family, were his predominant themes. By the 1960s Bearden was recognized as the preeminent collagist in the U.S. He is regarded as one of the most important African American artists of the 20th century
Ron Howard
(b. March 1, 1954, Duncan, Okla., U.S.) U.S. actor and director. He became a child star of television and films, appearing in The Music Man (1962) and on television's Andy Griffith Show (1960-68) and Happy Days (1974-80). He returned to movies in American Graffiti (1973), made his directorial debut with Grand Theft Auto (1977), and went on to direct such successful films as Splash (1984), Cocoon (1985), Parenthood (1989), Apollo 13 (1995), and A Beautiful Mind (2001, Academy Award). He heads his own production company
Tasker Howard Bliss
born Dec. 31, 1853, Lewisburg, Pa., U.S. died Nov. 9, 1930, Washington, D.C. U.S. general. After attending West Point (1875), he served in various military assignments, including that of instructor at West Point and military attaché at the U.S. legation in Madrid. In the Spanish-American War, he was chief of staff under Gen. James H. Wilson in Puerto Rico; he later served in the Philippines (1905-09). As army chief of staff in 1917, he made the U.S. Army battle-ready for World War I and resisted attempts to divide the force among the various Allied commands. He was a delegate to the Paris Peace Conference and an ardent supporter of U.S. participation in the League of Nations
Thomas Howard 1st earl of Suffolk
born Aug. 24, 1561 died May 28, 1626, London, Eng. English naval officer and politician. Son of the 4th duke of Norfolk, Howard held naval commands and distinguished himself in the attack on the Spanish Armada (1588). He led naval forays against the Spanish in the reign of Elizabeth I. Created earl of Suffolk in 1603, he served James I as lord chamberlain (1603-14) and lord high treasurer (1614-18). In 1618 he was deprived of his office on charges of embezzlement and was briefly imprisoned with his wife, who had taken bribes from Spain
Thomas Howard 2nd duke of Norfolk
born 1443 died May 21, 1524, Framlingham, Suffolk, Eng. English noble prominent in the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII. Son of the 1st duke of Norfolk, he was made steward of the royal household and created earl of Surrey in 1483. While fighting for Richard III, he was taken prisoner (and his father killed) in the Battle of Bosworth Field. After his release in 1489, he commanded the defense of the Scottish borders and later defeated the Scots at the Battle of Flodden. Norfolk later served as lord treasurer and a privy councillor, and he helped arrange the marriage of Margaret Tudor to James IV of Scotland. In 1520 he was guardian of England during Henry VIII's absence in France
Thomas Howard 3rd duke of Norfolk
born 1473 died Aug. 25, 1554, Kenninghall, Norfolk, Eng. English noble prominent in the reign of Henry VIII. Son of the 2nd duke of Norfolk, he was made lord high admiral in 1513 and helped rout the Scots at the Battle of Flodden. Succeeding his father as duke (1524), he led the faction opposed to Cardinal Wolsey, whom he replaced as president of the royal council in 1529. He supported the marriage of his niece Anne Boleyn to Henry (1533), but later (as lord high steward) he presided over her trial (1536). He skillfully suppressed the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion and by 1540 was the most powerful of Henry's councillors. His position weakened after his niece Catherine Howard was put to death (1542) and his son Henry Howard (1517-47) was executed for treason. Imprisoned as an accessory to his son, he was released by Queen Mary in 1553
Thomas Howard 4th duke of Norfolk
born March 10, 1538, Kenninghall, Norfolk, Eng. died June 2, 1572, London English noble executed for his intrigues against Queen Elizabeth I. He was the grandson of the 3rd duke of Norfolk, whom he succeeded as duke in 1554. In favour with both Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, Norfolk commanded the English forces that invaded Scotland in 1559-60. He led the commission to resolve problems between Mary, Queen of Scots, and Scotland's Protestant nobility (1568). He became involved in a plan to free Mary from imprisonment by marrying her and was arrested after a failed revolt by Catholic nobles (1569). Released in 1570, Norfolk was drawn into another plot to install Mary on the English throne through a Spanish invasion of England; discovery of the plot led to his arrest and execution
William Howard Schuman
born Aug. 4, 1910, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 15, 1992, New York City U.S. composer and administrator. He wrote songs in high school with his friend Frank Loesser. In 1930 he began studying composition with Roy Harris. He achieved success with his American Festival Overture (1939), and his Secular Cantata No. 2: A Free Song won the first Pulitzer Prize for music (1943). His other works include ballets for Martha Graham, the popular New England Triptych (1956), and 10 symphonies. As president of the Juilliard School (1945-62), he modernized its curriculum. As the first president of Lincoln Center (1962-68), he brought together several music organizations and established its Chamber Music Society and Mostly Mozart program
William Howard Taft
the twenty-seventh president of the US, from 1909 to 1913. He was also Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from 1921 to 1930 (1857-1930). born Sept. 15, 1857, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. died March 8, 1930, Washington, D.C. 27th president of the U.S. (1909-13). He served on the Ohio superior court (1887-90), as U.S. solicitor general (1890-92), and as U.S. appellate judge (1892-1900). He was appointed head of the Philippine Commission to set up a civilian government in the islands and was the Philippines' first civilian governor (1901-04). He served as U.S. secretary of war (1904-08) under Pres. Theodore Roosevelt, who supported Taft's nomination for president in 1908. He won the election but became allied with the conservative Republicans, causing a rift with party progressives. He was again the nominee in 1912, but the split with Roosevelt and the Bull Moose Party resulted in the electoral victory of Woodrow Wilson. Taft later taught law at Yale University (1913-21), served on the National War Labor Board (1918), and was a supporter of the League of Nations. As chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1921-30), he introduced reforms that made the court more efficient. His important opinion in Myers v. U.S. (1926) upheld the president's authority to remove federal officials
William Howard Taft
(1857-1930) 27th president of the United States (1909-1913)
Willie Howard Mays
born May 6, 1931, Westfield, Ala., U.S. U.S. baseball player. Mays played for the Birmingham Black Barons in the National Negro League when he was only
Willie Howard Mays
The "Say Hey Kid" later played principally for the New York (later San Francisco) Giants in the major leagues (1951-72). A brilliant centre fielder and a powerful right-handed hitter, he ranks among the all-time top five in home runs (660), runs (2,062), and extra-base hits (1,323) and among the top 10 for runs batted in (1,903) and hits (3,283). Mays is considered one of the greatest all-around players in the history of the game
howard

    Silbentrennung

    How·ard

    Türkische aussprache

    hauırd

    Aussprache

    /ˈhouərd/ /ˈhaʊɜrd/

    Etymologie

    [ 'hau(-&)rd ] (biographical name.) Medieval personal name from Old Norse Hávarðr, from hár (“high”) + varðr (“guard”), also from Germanic hug (“heart,mind”) + ward (“guard”). Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges: A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford University Press 1988.

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