homestead

listen to the pronunciation of homestead
Englisch - Englisch
the place that is one's home
A cluster of several houses occupied by an extended family
a house together with surrounding land and buildings, especially on a farm
To acquire or settle on land as a homestead
A statutory exemption of real property used as a home from the claims of certain creditors and judgments up to a specified amount; requires a declaration of homestead be completed and filed with the county recorder's office
Property designated by its owner as his home and protected by law in many jurisdictions from forced sale and other attack by creditors or taxing authorities In the United States, homesteads are usually limited by a maximum dollar amount, although some states such as Florida still permit an unlimited homestead exemption Homesteads are one of the most effective, though restricted, onshore wealth retention vehicles
A home upon which the owner or owners have recorded a Declaration of Homestead, as provided by California statutes; protects home against judgments up to specified amounts
land acquired from the United States public lands by filing a record and living on and cultivating it under the homestead law
A homestead is a farmhouse, together with the land around it
The dwelling (house and contiguous land) of the head of the family Some states grant statutory exemptions, protecting homestead property (usually to a set maximum amount) against the rights of the creditors Property tax exemptions are also available in some states
a house and the curtilage
The home and appurtenant land and buildings owned by the head of a family, and occupied by him and his family
A home upon which the owner or owners have recorded a Declaration of Homestead, protects home against judgments up to specified amounts
Real Estate that is owned and used as the family home Massachusetts allows protection from creditors for a homestead when it is declared and recorded at the Registry of Deeds
Property designated by the head of a family as his home and primary residence Also defined as land claimed by a settler under the National Homestead Act
In United States history, a homestead was a piece of government land in the west, which was given to someone so they could settle there and develop a farm. to live and work on a homestead. Homestead Movement Homestead National Monument Homestead Strike
The home place; a home and the inclosure or ground immediately connected with it
{i} house and property (especially a farm); section of land claimed by a settler (especially under the U.S. Homestead Act)
settle land given by the government and occupy it as a homestead
Property designated by a householder as the householder's home and protected by law from forced sale to meet debts
dwelling that is usually a farmhouse and adjoining land
Status provided to a homeowner's principal residence in some states that protects the home against judgements up to specified amounts
The primary residence including the land and building surrounding the main house
a homestead usually is a home on land obtained from the United States government Part of the agreement between the individual and the government was that the individual had to live on the land and make improvements to it, such as adding buildings and clearing fields
A house that is located on land occupied by the owner, surrounded by outbuildings, exempt from seizure and forced sale for debt Under the Dominion Lands Act, the "permanent dwelling" and all farm buildings surrounding it were considered the homestead
The way the various exemption acts refer to your principal residence whether it be a house, apartment, condo or other real property Top
Term used for taxing purposes to describe homes and farms
The dwelling (house and contiguous land) of the head of a family Some states grant statutory exemptions, protecting homestead property (usually to a set maximum amount) against the rights of creditors Property tax exemptions (for all or part of the tax) are also available in some states Statutory requirements to establish a homestead may include a formal declaration to be recorded
A statutory protection from execution or the establishment of title by occupation of real property in accordance with the laws of various States or the Federal Government
A parcel of land used by the owner as a primary residence
The dwelling (house and contiguous land) of the head of a family Some states grant statutory exemptions, protecting homestead property (usually to set a maximum amount) against the rights of creditors Property tax exemptions (for all or part of the tax) are also available in some states Statutory requirements to establish a homestead may include a formal declaration to be recorded
Status provided to a homeowner's principal residence in some states that protects the home against judgments up to specified amounts
In some states, the home and property occupied by an owner are protected by law from attachment and sale for the claims of creditors (up to a certain amount)
- The house and the adjoining land (within statutory limits) where the head of the family lives; the family's fixed place of residence
>> Status provided to a homeowner's principal residence by some state statutes; protects a home against judgments up to specified amounts
the home and adjacent grounds occupied by a family
A home upon which the owner or owners have recorded a declaration of homestead, which protects the home against judgments up to specified amounts
dwelling that is usually a farmhouse and adjoining land land acquired from the United States public lands by filing a record and living on and cultivating it under the homestead law the home and adjacent grounds occupied by a family settle land given by the government and occupy it as a homestead
The home or seat of a family; place of origin
A limited exemption against the claims of unsecured creditors for property used as the debtors residence
Homestead Movement
Mid-19th-century drive for free land in the U.S. Midwest, Great Plains, and West. It began in the 1830s as labourers and reformers joined farmers in calling for public land to be given free to settlers. In 1848 the Free Soil Party advocated the homestead proposal. Opposition from industrial employers and Southern slaveholders blocked legislation until the 1860 election, when the winning Republican Party supported a homestead measure. In 1862 the Homestead Act was passed, providing 160 acres of public land free to any adult citizen or head of family who had lived on the land for five years. By 1900, 600,000 homesteaders had claimed 80 million acres
Homestead National Monument
Memorial, southeastern Nebraska, U.S. Established in 1936 as a memorial to the hardships of pioneer life, it is the site of the first claim under the Homestead Act of 1862 and has exhibits tracing the development of the Homestead Movement. It occupies 163 acres (66 hectares) and includes a homestead log cabin
Homestead Strike
U.S. labour strike at Andrew Carnegie's steelworks in Homestead, Pa. , in July 1892. When the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers went on strike following a wage cut, the company's manager, Henry Clay Frick, hired strikebreakers, with Pinkerton Agency detectives to protect them. A gun battle resulted in which several people were killed and many injured; the governor sent state militiamen to support the company. The broken strike represented a major setback to the union movement that was felt for decades
homestead act
Passed by the Republican-dominated Congress in 1862, this act granted 160 acres free to individuals who agreed to farm that land for at least five years It was part of the Union effort to sustain wartime prosperity
homestead act
The 1862 Homestead Act gave a settler 160 acres (80 within railroad grant areas) for living on a tract of land for 5 years and showing improvement to the land Improvements consisted of clearing the land for farming, building a house, ranching, etc Other land grant acts were also issued over the years but the Homestead Act is probably the most famous
homestead act
a law for getting people to move to the Great Plains and the Northwest
homestead act
Legislation passed in 1862 allowing any citizen or applicant for citizenship over 21 years old and head of a family to acquire 160 acres of public land by living on it and cultivating it for five years
homestead deed
document in which a homeowner officially declares his property as a homestead (and therefore protects it according to homestead laws)
homestead law
a law conferring privileges on owners of homesteads
homestead law
Any of several laws passed in most states exempting a householder's homestead from attachment or forced sale to meet general debts
homestead law
law that protects a home from debt-related seizure or repossession; law that makes public land available for agricultural use; law that provides tax credits to homeowners
homesteader
A pioneer who goes and settles on a homestead
homesteaded
past of homestead
homesteader
someone who settles lawfully on government land with the intent to acquire title to it
homesteader
One who has entered upon a portion of the public land with the purpose of acquiring ownership of it under provisions of the homestead law, so called; one who has acquired a homestead in this manner
homesteader
{i} one who claims a section of land (especially under the U.S. Homestead Act)
homesteaders
plural of homesteader
homesteading
present participle of homestead
homesteading
{i} act of establishing a home or dwelling
homesteads
plural of homestead
homestead
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