duke

listen to the pronunciation of duke
Englisch - Türkisch
dük

Zehirli bir kiraz bir dükü öldürebilir. - A poisoned cherry may kill a duke.

Dük kalktı ve sevgiyle karısını öptü. - The Duke rose and kissed his wife lovingly.

dük dukedom dukalık
(isim) dük
yumruk
duka
duke it out
Dük bunu
duke it out
(deyim) Yumruklaşmak

Gerry wanted to duke it out with the referee - tried to punch him.

duke of edinburgh
edinburgh dükü
duke test
(Tıp) duke testi
grand duke
büyük dük
dukedom
dukalık
grand duke
grand dük
grand duke
grandük
george 1st duke of albermarle monck
albermarle monck 1. dükü george
dukedom
dükalık
dukedom
düklük
dukes
yumruklar
dukes
Dük/yumruk
grand duke
çarın oğlu
Englisch - Englisch
A male given name; mostly U.S. and rather rare
A private university in North Carolina
The title of a duke
A grand duke
A fist

This is thought to be derived from Cockney rhyming slang where Duke(s) of York = Fork. Fork is itself cockney slang for hand, and thus fist.

The male ruler of a duchy (compare duchess)
To hit or beat with the fists
A high title of nobility; the male holder of a dukedom
{n} a title, the next dignity below a prince
given name, male
The highest rank in the peerage of Great Britain
derived from the Latin dux, meaning "a leader;" Arabic, "a sheik " This word is used to denote the phylarch or chief of a tribe (Gen 36: 15-43; Ex 15: 15; 1 Chr 1: 51-54)
(1) (B) very strong hand (2) See also Iron Duke
{f} fight, be engaged in a struggle, battle
To play the duke
A duke is a man with a very high social rank. the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh. a man with the highest social rank outside the royal family duchess (duc, from dux , from ducere ). European title of nobility, the highest rank below a prince or king except in countries having such titles as archduke or grand duke. The wife of a duke is a duchess. The Romans gave the title dux to high military commanders with territorial responsibilities. It was adopted by the barbarian invaders of the Roman Empire and was used in their kingdoms and also in France and Germany for rulers of very large areas. In some European countries a duke is a sovereign prince who rules an independent duchy. In Britain, where there were no ducal titles until 1337, it is a hereditary title. Alba Fernando Álvarez de Toledo y Pimentel 3rd duke de Berry Jean de France duke de Broglie Louis Victor Pierre-Raymond duke de Buckingham 1st duke of Buckingham 2nd duke of Choiseul Étienne François de Choiseul duke de Duke University Duke James Buchanan Duke Vernon Ellington Duke Farnese Alessandro duke di Parma and Piacenza Fouché Joseph duke d'Otrante Guise François de Lorraine 2nd duke de Guise Henri I de Lorraine 3rd duke de Guise Henri II de Lorraine 5th duke de duke d'Anjou duc duke d'Orléans John of Gaunt duke of Lancaster La Rochefoucauld François VI duke de Marlborough John Churchill 1st duke of Masséna André duke de Rivoli Monck George 1st duke of Albermarle Monmouth James Scott duke of Montmorency Anne duke de Morny Charles Auguste Louis Joseph duke de Newcastle under Lyme Thomas Pelham Holles 1st duke of Newcastle upon Tyne William Cavendish 1st duke of Ney Michel duke d'Elchingen Norfolk Thomas Howard 2nd duke of Norfolk Thomas Howard 3rd duke of Norfolk Thomas Howard 4th duke of Northumberland John Dudley duke of Orléans Louis Philippe Joseph duke d' Ormonde James Butler 12th earl and 1st duke of Philippe duke d'Anjou Philip duke of Edinburgh Richelieu Armand Jean du Plessis cardinal and duke de Rohan Henri duke de Shrewsbury Charles Talbot duke and 12th earl of Somerset Edward Seymour 1st duke of Sully Maximilien de Béthune duke de Villars Claude Louis Hector duke de Wellington Arthur Wellesley 1st duke of Henrique infante prince de Portugal duque duke de Viseu senhor lord da Covilha duke de Magenta Napoleon II duke von Reichstadt Karl Peter Ulrich duke von Holstein Gottorp Wallenstein Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von duke von Friedland Duke von Mecklenburg Diane de France duchess de Montmorency and Angoulême Diane de Poitiers duchess de Valentinois Marlborough Sarah Jennings duchess of Windsor Wallis Warfield duchess of Chevreuse Marie de Rohan Montbazon duchess de
In some European countries, a sovereign prince, without the title of king
{i} ruler of duchy, high-ranking noble
a British peer of the highest rank a nobleman (in various countries) of high rank
a nobleman (in various countries) of high rank
A lord who has been King two or more times
In England, one of the highest order of nobility after princes and princesses of the royal blood and the four archbishops of England and Ireland
A leader; a chief; a prince
The Great Duke The Duke of Wellington, called "the Iron Duke " (1769-1852 )
a British peer of the highest rank
Grand duke
Noun (Plural: Dukes) Highest ranking aristocrat, apart from the monarchy For example, Duke of Rutland
A man who has been King at least twice Addressed as "Your Grace" or "My Lord Duke," or "Duke (Firstname) "
duke it out
To fight, especially with the fists

A large crowd came to watch the boxers duke it out.

duke it out
To argue heavily or at length

Like pharmaceutical companies that sue generic drug makers over their patents or technology companies that duke it out over who owns the right to microchip designs, Levi’s says it is trying to protect its most valuable asset, its trademarks. - 29/01/2007, New York Times.

duke it out
(deyim) Fight with your fists, punch each other

Gerry wanted to duke it out with the referee - tried to punch him.

Duke Ellington
{i} (1899-1974, born as Edward Kennedy Ellington) U.S. jazz composer and pianist and orchestrator
Duke Ellington
a US jazz composer and piano player, who was also a very successful band leader (1899-1974). orig. Edward Kennedy Ellington born April 29, 1899, Washington, D.C., U.S. died May 24, 1974, New York, N.Y. U.S. pianist, bandleader, arranger, and composer. He formed his band in 1924 in Washington, D.C.; by 1927 it was performing regularly at the Cotton Club in Harlem. Until the end of his life his band would enjoy the highest professional and artistic reputation in jazz. First known for his distinctive "jungle" sound a description derived from the use of growling muted brass and sinister harmonies Ellington increasingly integrated blues elements into his music. He composed with the idiosyncratic sounds of his instrumentalists in mind. Many of his players spent most of their careers with the band; they included saxophonists Johnny Hodges and Harry Carney, bassist Jimmy Blanton, trombonists Tricky Sam Nanton and Lawrence Brown, and trumpeters Bubber Miley and Cootie Williams. Pianist Billy Strayhorn was Ellington's frequent collaborator. Ellington composed a massive body of work, including music for dancing, popular songs, large-scale concert works, musical theatre, and film scores. His best-known compositions include "Mood Indigo," "Satin Doll," "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," and "Sophisticated Lady
Duke University
private university located in North Carolina (USA)
Duke University
Private university in Durham, N.C. It was created in 1924 through an endowment from James B. Duke, although the original college (Trinity) traces its roots to the mid 19th century. Duke maintained separate campuses for undergraduate men and women until the 1970s. Besides an undergraduate liberal arts college, the university includes schools of business, divinity, engineering, environmental studies, graduate studies, law, medicine (including a medical centre), and nursing
Duke of Edinburgh
The husband of the British queen, Elizabeth II. His name is Prince Philip (1921- ). Duke of Edinburgh, the
Duke of Edinburgh's award
Duke of Edinburgh's a special prize given to someone who has successfully completed a number of activities in a programme that was originally set up in the UK by the Duke of Edinburgh. The programme is designed for young people, and its aim is to encourage them to achieve difficult things and do work that helps other people. The programme includes physical activities such as climbing mountains, camping, hiking and other outdoor activities
Duke of Wellington
a British soldier and politician, born in Ireland, and sometimes called "the Iron Duke". He was a very successful military leader, and is famous for defeating Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. He later became Prime Minister (1828-34) (1769-1852). Duke of Wellington, the
Duke of Windsor
Edward VIII, King
Duke of York
Andrew, Prince. AnDrew, Prince
duke d'Anjou Philippe
Spanish Felipe orig. Philippe, duke d'Anjou born Dec. 19, 1683, Versailles, France died July 9, 1746, Madrid, Spain King of Spain (1700-46). Grandson of Louis XIV of France and great-grandson of Philip IV of Spain, Philip was named to succeed the childless Charles II as king in 1700. Louis's refusal to exclude Philip from the line of succession to the French throne led to the War of the Spanish Succession. The resultant Peace of Utrecht (1713) deprived Philip of the Spanish Netherlands and parts of Italy, but it left him Spain and Spanish America. Initially influenced by his French advisers through his wife, Maria Luise of Savoy, after her death (1714) he was influenced by his second wife, Elizabeth Farnese, and her Italian advisers. Attempts to secure territories in Italy caused the formation of the Quadruple Alliance (1718) against Spain. Philip later brought Spain into the War of the Austrian Succession. His reign marked the beginning of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain (see house of Bourbon)
duke it out
fight it out, participate in a struggle in which the strongest wins
duke of Edinburgh Philip
known as Prince Philip born June 10, 1921, Corfu, Greece Husband of Queen Elizabeth II of Britain. Son of Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (1882-1944) and Princess Alice (1885-1969), a great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria, he was reared in Britain. In World War II he served in combat with the Royal Navy. In 1947 he became a British subject, taking his mother's surname, Mountbatten, and renouncing his right to the Greek and Danish thrones. He married Princess Elizabeth in 1947 and continued on active service in the navy until her accession to the throne in 1952. Charles, prince of Wales, is their son
duke of Lancaster John of Gaunt
born March 1340, Ghent died Feb. 3, 1399, London, Eng. English prince, the fourth son of Edward III. John's additional name, "Gaunt" (a corruption of the name of his birthplace, Ghent), was not used after he was three years old; it became the popularly accepted form of his name, however, through its use in William Shakespeare's play Richard II. John served as a commander in the Hundred Years' War against France, then returned to become an important influence in his father's last years as king and in the reign of his nephew Richard II. Through his first wife, John acquired the duchy of Lancaster in 1362, and he was the immediate ancestor of the three 15th-century monarchs of the house of Lancaster: Henry IV, Henry V, and Henry VI
duke university
a university in Durham, North Carolina
duke von Holstein-Gottorp Karl Peter Ulrich
Russian Pyotr Fyodorovich orig. Karl Peter Ulrich, duke von Holstein-Gottorp born Feb. 21, 1728, Kiel, Holstein-Gottorp died July 18, 1762, Ropsha, near St. Petersburg, Russia Tsar of Russia (1762). Grandson of Peter I, the young duke was brought to Russia by his aunt Elizabeth when she became empress (1741). Proclaimed the heir to the Russian throne, he was unpopular at court for his pro-Prussian attitude. After he succeeded Elizabeth (1762), he reversed her foreign policy, making peace with Prussia and withdrawing from the Seven Years' War. He offended the Orthodox church by trying to force it to adopt Lutheran practices. After six months he was forced to abdicate by a group of nobles, in collusion with his own wife, Catherine (later Catherine II), and Count Grigory Orlov, and was murdered while in the conspirators' custody
duke von Reichstadt Napoleon II
orig. Napoléon-François-Charles-Joseph Bonaparte born March 20, 1811, Paris, France died July 22, 1832, Schönbrunn, Austria The only son of Napoleon and Marie-Louise, he was born during Napoleon's reign as emperor and styled "King of Rome. " On Napoleon's abdication (1814), Marie-Louise took her son to live at the court of her father, Emperor Francis II, rather than allow him to remain in France as the focus of resistance as Napoleon II. Given the Austrian title of duke of Reichstadt, he was controlled by Klemens, prince von Metternich. In 1830 Bonapartist insurgents attempted to restore Reichstadt as Napoleon II, but he was already ill with tuberculosis, which would kill him
duque duke de Viseu senhor lord da Covilha Henrique, infante prince de Portugal
Portuguese Henrique o Navegador orig. Henrique, infante (prince) de Portugal, duque (duke) de Viseu, senhor (lord) da Covilha born March 4, 1394, Porto, Port. died Nov. 13, 1460, Vila do Infante, near Sagres Portuguese prince and patron of explorers. He helped his father, John I, capture the Moroccan city of Ceuta in 1415 and served as governor of Ceuta and later of the Portuguese province of Algarve. He established his own court at Sagres and sponsored voyages of discovery in the Madeira Islands and along the western coast of Africa. As grand master of the Order of Christ, he gained funds for backing voyages aimed at the conversion of pagans. His patronage led to the development of the Portuguese caravel and improved navigational instruments and the advancement of cartography
arch duke
A comical or eccentric peron. (1811 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue)
dukedom
the rank or title of a duke
grand duke
Son or grandson of a czar (emperor) of the Russian Empire. (A more literal translation of the Russian would be "grand prince".)
grand duke
Ruler or monarch of a grand duchy
dukedom
{n} the possessions or title of a duke
1st duke of Buckingham
v. orig. George Villiers born Aug. 28, 1592, Brooksby, Leicestershire, Eng. died Aug. 23, 1628, Portsmouth, Hampshire English courtier and politician. Charming and handsome, he quickly became a royal favourite of James I and the future Charles I. He became lord high admiral in 1619 and was created a duke in 1623, but his arrogance and abuse of power made him highly unpopular. His erratic foreign policy led to a series of disasters, including failed military expeditions to Spain and France. A bill to impeach him was introduced in Parliament in 1626, prompting Charles to dissolve Parliament. When Buckingham was assassinated by a naval lieutenant, Londoners rejoiced
2nd duke of Buckingham
v. orig. George Villiers born Jan. 30, 1628, London, Eng. died April 16, 1687, Kirkby Moorside, Yorkshire English politician. Born eight months before the assassination of his father, the 1st duke of Buckingham, he was brought up with the family of Charles I. He fought for Charles II in the English Civil Wars, and after the Restoration in 1660 Buckingham became a leading member of the king's inner circle of ministers, known as the Cabal. Parliament had him dismissed from his posts for alleged Catholic sympathies in 1674
4th Duke of Devonshire
{i} William Cavendish (1720-1764), 4th Duke of Devonshire, British statesman, former Prime Minister of Britain (1756-1757)
Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von duke von Friedland Wallenstein
later Duke von Mecklenburg born Sept. 24, 1583, Hemanice, Bohemia died Feb. 25, 1634, Eger Austrian general. A noble of Bohemia, he served with the future Habsburg emperor Ferdinand II in the campaign against Venice in 1617. He remained loyal to Ferdinand when other Bohemian nobles revolted (1618-23) and was made governor of Bohemia and allowed to acquire vast holdings in confiscated estates. Created duke of Friedland (1625), he commanded the imperial armies in the Thirty Years' War. After successes in the war against Denmark (1625-29), he was awarded the principality of Sagan (1627) and the duchy of Mecklenburg (1629). Under pressure from the German princes, Ferdinand was forced to dismiss Wallenstein. Recalled to imperial command in 1631, he drove the Swedish army from Bavaria and Franconia but was defeated at the Battle of Lützen (1632). Believing he had the support of his generals, he mounted a revolt against the emperor (1634) and was assassinated
Alessandro duke di Parma and Piacenza Farnese
born Aug. 27, 1545, Rome died Dec. 3, 1592, Arras, France Regent of the Netherlands (1578-92) for Philip II of Spain. He was educated at the court of Madrid, where he had been sent to prove his father's loyalty to the Habsburgs. In 1578 Philip II appointed him governor-general of the Netherlands, where his mother, Margaret of Parma, had been regent earlier. His great achievement was the restoration of Spanish rule in the southern provinces and perpetuation of Roman Catholicism there. He succeeded by astute statesmanship and military operations against the alliance of rebellious Protestant provinces led by William the Silent. In 1586 he succeeded his father as duke of Parma and Piacenza, but he never returned to Italy to rule
Anne duke de Montmorency
born March 15, 1493, Chantilly, France died Nov. 12, 1567, Paris French soldier and constable of France. Named for his godmother, Queen Anne of Brittany, he served three kings Francis I, Henry II, and Charles IX in war and peace. He fought in numerous wars in northern Italy and southern France against Emperor Charles V and in campaigns against the Huguenots. In 1529 he helped negotiate the Peace of Cambrai between France and Charles V. He was created constable of France in 1538, and he became a duke and peer in 1551. Wounded at the Battle of Saint-Denis, he died two days later
Armand-Jean du Plessis cardinal and duke de Richelieu
born Sept. 9, 1585, Richelieu, Poitou, France died Dec. 4, 1642, Paris French statesman and chief minister to Louis XIII. Born to a minor noble family, he was ordained a priest in 1607 and became bishop of Luçon. As the first bishop in France to implement reforms decreed by the Council of Trent, he brought order to a diocese ruined by the Wars of Religion. In 1614 he was elected a deputy of the clergy in the Estates-General, where he was noted as a conciliatory force. He became an adviser to Marie de Médicis in 1616 and later councillor to her son, Louis XIII. Named a cardinal in 1622, he served as chief minister from 1624 and became the controlling influence in France's policies. He established royal absolutism in France by suppressing the political power of the Huguenots and reducing the influence of the nobles. In foreign policy, he sought to weaken Habsburg control of Europe and involved France in the Thirty Years' War. Devious and brilliant, he increased the power of the Bourbon dynasty and established orderly government in France. He also founded the Académie Française and rebuilt the Sorbonne
Arthur Wellesley 1st duke of Wellington
born May 1, 1769, Dublin, Ire. died Sept. 14, 1852, Walmer Castle, Kent, Eng. British general. Son of the Irish earl of Mornington, he entered the army in 1787 and served in the Irish Parliament (1790-97). Sent to India in 1796, he commanded troops to victories in the Maratha War (1803). Back in England, he served in the British House of Commons and as chief secretary in Ireland (1807-09). Commanding British troops in the Peninsular War, he won battles against the French in Portugal and Spain and invaded France to win the war in 1814, for which he was promoted to field marshal and created a duke. After Napoleon renewed the war against the European powers, the "Iron Duke" commanded the Allied armies to victory at the Battle of Waterloo (1815). Richly rewarded by English and foreign sovereigns, he became one of the most honoured men in Europe. After commanding the army of occupation in France (1815-18) and serving in the Tory cabinet as master general of ordnance (1818-27), he served as prime minister (1828-30), but he was forced to resign after opposing any parliamentary reform. He was honoured on his death by a monumental funeral and burial in St. Paul's Cathedral alongside Horatio Nelson
Charles Talbot duke and 12th earl of Shrewsbury
born July 24, 1660 died Feb. 1, 1718, London, Eng. English statesman. He inherited his father's title at age seven and was raised as a Catholic. He became a Protestant in 1679 and in 1688 was one of seven men who invited William of Orange to seize power from James II. After aiding the successful rebellion, Shrewsbury served William III as secretary of state (1689-90, 1694-99) and was created a duke in 1694. Shifting his allegiance from the Whigs, he served in a Tory administration as lord lieutenant of Ireland (1710-14) and was appointed by Queen Anne as lord high treasurer (1714). He obtained recognition of George I as the legitimate royal heir and assured the peaceful succession of the house of Hanover
Charles-Auguste-Louis-Joseph duke de Morny
born Oct. 21, 1811, Paris, France died March 10, 1865, Paris French politician. Half brother of Louis-Napoléon (later Napoleon III), Morny devoted himself to Parisian society and to making a fortune before serving in the Chamber of Deputies (1842-48, 1849). Appointed minister of the interior in 1851, he organized the plebiscite that made Louis-Napoléon dictator. As president of the legislature (1856-65), he tried unsuccessfully to persuade Napoleon III to give France more liberty
Claude-Louis-Hector duke de Villars
v. born May 8, 1653, Moulins, France died June 17, 1734, Turin, Sardinia French soldier. He distinguished himself in France's war against the Dutch (1672-78) and in the War of the Grand Alliance. After leading French forces to early victories in the War of the Spanish Succession, he was made a marshal of France (1702) and a duke (1705). He continued successful military campaigns in Germany (1705-08), inflicted heavy losses on the duke of Marlborough's forces at Malplaquet (1709), and defeated Eugene of Savoy at Denain (1712). He served on the regency council for the young Louis XV. At the outbreak of the War of the Polish Succession, he was given the exceptional title of marshal general of France (1733) and sent to attack Austrian lands in northern Italy
Edward Seymour 1st duke of Somerset
born 1500/06 died Jan. 22, 1552, London, Eng. English politician. After his sister, Jane Seymour, married King Henry VIII in 1536, Somerset rose rapidly in royal favour. He commanded the English forces that invaded Scotland and sacked Edinburgh in 1544, and he decisively defeated the French at Boulogne in 1545. After Henry's death (1547), he was named Protector of England during the minority of Edward VI and acted as king in all but name. When the Scots rejected his appeal for a voluntary union with England, he invaded Scotland and won the Battle of Pinkie (1547). He introduced moderate Protestant reforms, but these provoked Catholic uprisings in western England. His land reforms were opposed by landowners and the duke of Northumberland, who had Somerset deposed from the protectorate in 1549. He was imprisoned in 1551 on a flimsy charge of treason and executed the next year
First Duke of Wellington
Arthur Wellesley (1769-1852), British general who defeated Napoleon at Waterloo, prime minister of England (1828-1830)
François VI duke de La Rochefoucauld
v. born Sept. 15, 1613, Paris, France died March 16/17, 1680, Paris French writer. Of a noble family, he joined the army at an early age and was wounded several times. He later played a leading part in the Fronde but gradually won his way back into royal favour. He turned his energies to intellectual pursuits and became the leading exponent of the maxime, a French form of epigram that concisely expresses a harsh or paradoxical truth. Maximes (five eds., 1665-78), his principal achievement, consists of 500 reflections on human behaviour. His Mémoires (1664) recount the plots and campaigns of mutinous nobles during the Fronde
François de Lorraine 2nd duke de Guise
born Feb. 24, 1519, Bar, France died Feb. 24, 1563, Orléans French soldier and loyal servant to the French crown, the greatest figure produced by the house of Guise. He fought in Francis I's army and was badly wounded at the siege of Boulogne (1545), earning him the nickname "the Scarred." He led French armies in other victories against the English and the Spanish. On the accession of Francis II (1559), Guise became grand master of the royal household. The Bourbons launched a conspiracy to overthrow the Guises, who learned of the plot and ruthlessly suppressed it (1560). When Catherine de Médicis became regent (1560), she supported the Bourbons (who were leaders of the Huguenot movement) and religious toleration and was against the Guises and Catholic dominance. The first of the resultant Wars of Religion again showed Guise to be an outstanding soldier. He was assassinated by a Huguenot in 1563
George 1st duke of Albermarle Monck
born Dec. 6, 1608, Great Potheridge, Devon, Eng. died Jan. 3, 1670, London English general. He served with the Dutch army against the Spanish in the Netherlands (1629-38) and later suppressed a rebellion in Ireland (1642-43). He fought in Ireland and Scotland in the English Civil Wars, then served in Scotland as commander (1650) and governor (1654). Appointed a general at sea (1652) in the Anglo-Dutch Wars, he played a leading part in the English naval victories. In 1660 he was the chief architect of the Restoration of the Stuart monarchy, for which he was created duke of Albemarle
Grand Old Duke of York
a character in a British nursery rhyme (=an old song or poem for children) The rhyme goes: Oh the Grand Old Duke of York/ He had ten thousand men,/ He marched them up to the top of the hill/ And he marched them down again
Henri I de Lorraine 3rd duke de Guise
born Dec. 31, 1550 died Dec. 23, 1588, Blois, France French leader of the Catholic party and the Holy League during the French Wars of Religion. When Catherine de Médicis turned to the Guises in 1572 for help in removing the Huguenot Gaspard II de Coligny, Henri, who blamed Coligny for the murder of his father, the 2nd duke de Guise, helped plan the Massacre of Saint Bartholomew's Day. Fearing Guise's growing popularity, Henry III made peace with the Huguenots in 1576, and Guise angrily countered by forming the Holy League. After Guise's victory in the War of the Three Henrys (1588), Henry was forced to surrender to the Holy League's demands, and Guise was appointed lieutenant general of France. Soon afterward the king's bodyguard stabbed Guise to death; the next day his brother, Louis II (1555-88), Cardinal de Guise, was also murdered
Henri II de Lorraine 5th duke de Guise
born April 4, 1614, Blois, France died June 2, 1664 French leader of the house of Guise. He was already archbishop of Rheims when he became duke de Guise in 1640. After being sentenced to death for his part in a conspiracy against Cardinal de Richelieu (1641), he fled to Brussels and commanded the Austrian troops against France. He unsuccessfully led the Neapolitans in their war against Spain (1647, 1654), then spent the rest of his life at the French court, trying unsuccessfully to revive the power of the Guise dynasty
Henri duke de Rohan
born 1579, Château of Blain, Brittany, France died April 13, 1638, Königsfeld, Switz. French Huguenot leader. At age 16 he entered the army of Henry IV, who made him a peer of France in 1603. After Henry's death (1610), Rohan led the Huguenots in revolt against the government of Marie de Médicis (1615-16) and became the Huguenots' foremost general in the civil wars of the 1620s. He recounted the events of the War of La Rochelle (1627-29) in his celebrated Mémoires. He then went to Venice. After his return to France (1635), he successfully commanded a French expedition against the Habsburgs in Lombardy. In 1637 he went to Switzerland, where he died in the Thirty Years' War battle at Rheinfelden
Iron Duke
a name sometimes used for the Duke of Wellington
James B Duke
born Dec. 23, 1856, Durham, N.C., U.S. died Oct. 10, 1925, New York, N.Y. U.S. tobacco magnate and philanthropist. He and his brother Benjamin (1855-1929) entered the family tobacco business. In 1890 James became president of the American Tobacco Co., which controlled the entire U.S. tobacco industry until antitrust laws caused it, in 1911, to be broken into several companies that would become the principal U.S. cigarette makers. He oversaw the family's contributions to Trinity College in Durham, which was renamed Duke University
James Buchanan Duke
born Dec. 23, 1856, Durham, N.C., U.S. died Oct. 10, 1925, New York, N.Y. U.S. tobacco magnate and philanthropist. He and his brother Benjamin (1855-1929) entered the family tobacco business. In 1890 James became president of the American Tobacco Co., which controlled the entire U.S. tobacco industry until antitrust laws caused it, in 1911, to be broken into several companies that would become the principal U.S. cigarette makers. He oversaw the family's contributions to Trinity College in Durham, which was renamed Duke University
James Butler 12th earl and 1st duke of Ormonde
born Oct. 19, 1610, London, Eng. died July 21, 1688, Kingston Lacy, Dorset Anglo-Irish statesman. Born into the prominent Butler family of Ireland, he succeeded to the earldom of Ormonde in 1632. In service to the English crown in Ireland from 1633, he fought against the Catholic rebellion from 1641. He concluded a peace with the Catholic confederacy in 1649, then rallied support for Charles II, but he was forced to flee when Oliver Cromwell landed at Dublin. He was Charles's adviser in exile (1650-60). After the Restoration he was appointed lord lieutenant of Ireland (1662-69, 1677-84), where he encouraged Irish commerce and industry. He was created a duke in 1682
James Scott duke of Monmouth
orig. James Fitzroy or James Crofts born April 9, 1649, Rotterdam, Neth. died July 15, 1685, London, Eng. British military leader. The illegitimate son of Charles II of England, he lived in Paris with his mother. In 1662 he was brought to England as a favourite of the king, who created him duke of Monmouth. He married the Scottish heiress Anne Scott, duchess of Buccleuch, and took her surname. A member of the king's guard from 1668, he commanded troops in the Anglo-Dutch War and against Scottish rebels in 1679. He was championed for the royal succession by the anti-Catholic Whigs, but after the unsuccessful Rye House Plot he took refuge in the Netherlands (1684). Returning after Charles's death to challenge James II, he and his army of peasants were defeated, and he was captured and beheaded
Jean de France duke de Berry
orig. Charles-Ferdinand de Bourbon born Jan. 24, 1778, Versailles, France died Feb. 14, 1820, Paris French nobleman. Son of the future Charles X, he left France at the outbreak of the French Revolution and lived abroad until 1815. His assassination by a Bonapartist fanatic marked a turning point in the Bourbon Restoration, hastening the downfall of the moderate Decazes government and the polarization into liberal and royalist groups. born Nov. 30, 1340, Vincennes, France died June 15, 1416, Paris French nobleman and patron of the arts. He was the son of King John II. As duke de Berry and Auvergne, he controlled at least one-third of France during the middle period of the Hundred Years' War. Berry shared in the administration of France and worked for peace with England and within France, acting as diplomat and mediator. He invested fortunes in the art treasures that became his monument paintings, tapestries, jewelry, and illuminated manuscripts that included the famous Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry
John Churchill 1st duke of Marlborough
born May 26, 1650, Ashe, Devon, Eng. died June 16, 1722, Windsor, near London British military commander. He served with distinction at Maastricht (1673), was promoted rapidly, and advanced at court, in part because his wife (see Sarah Jennings, duchess of Marlborough) was a confidant of Princess (later Queen) Anne. On the accession of James II in 1685, Churchill was made a lieutenant general and effective commander in chief. In 1688 he transferred his allegiance to William III, who rewarded him with the earldom of Marlborough and a succession of commands in Flanders and Ireland. His relationship with William deteriorated in the 1690s. Queen Anne appointed him commander of English and Dutch forces in the War of the Spanish Succession, and for his successes he was created duke of Marlborough (1702). His victory at the Battle of Blenheim (1704) helped change the balance of power in Europe. In gratitude, he was granted a royal manor, where Blenheim Palace was built. His outstanding military tactics continued to produce victories, notably at Ramillies (1706) and Oudenaarde (1708). His influence with Queen Anne and financial backing for the war were undermined by intrigue between Tories and Whigs. After his Whig allies lost the election of 1710, he was dismissed on charges of misuse of public money. He retired from public life, though he was restored to favour by George I in 1714. Considered one of England's greatest generals, he secured a reputation in Europe that was unrivaled until the rise of Napoleon
John Dudley duke of Northumberland
born 1502 died Aug. 22, 1553, London, Eng. English politician. After serving as deputy governor of English-occupied Calais (1538) and lord high admiral (1542), he fought in the invasion of Scotland (1544) and captured the French city of Boulogne (1544). He was created earl of Warwick (1546) and in 1547 became a member of the regency council that governed for the young Edward VI. After engineering the fall of the duke of Somerset, Warwick assumed control of the regency (1550). He made himself duke of Northumberland in 1551 and ordered Somerset's arrest and execution in 1552. He imposed strict conformity to Protestant doctrine in support of the Reformation. In 1553 he persuaded the dying Edward VI to will the crown to Northumberland's daughter-in-law, Lady Jane Grey; thwarted by supporters of Mary Tudor (Mary I), he was arrested and executed for treason
Louis-Victor duke de Broglie
born Aug. 15, 1892, Dieppe, France died March 19, 1987, Paris French physicist. A descendant of the de Broglie family of diplomats and politicians, he was inspired to study atomic physics by the work of Max Planck and Albert Einstein. In his doctoral thesis he described his theory of electron waves, then extended the wave-particle duality theory of light to matter. He is noted both for his discovery of the wave nature of electrons and for his research on quantum theory. Einstein built on de Broglie's idea of "matter-waves"; based on this work, Erwin Schrödinger constructed the system of wave mechanics. De Broglie remained at the Sorbonne after 1924 and taught theoretical physics at the Henri Poincaré Institute (1928-62). He was awarded a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1929 and UNESCO's Kalinga Prize in 1952
Louis-Victor -Pierre-Raymond duke de Broglie
born Aug. 15, 1892, Dieppe, France died March 19, 1987, Paris French physicist. A descendant of the de Broglie family of diplomats and politicians, he was inspired to study atomic physics by the work of Max Planck and Albert Einstein. In his doctoral thesis he described his theory of electron waves, then extended the wave-particle duality theory of light to matter. He is noted both for his discovery of the wave nature of electrons and for his research on quantum theory. Einstein built on de Broglie's idea of "matter-waves"; based on this work, Erwin Schrödinger constructed the system of wave mechanics. De Broglie remained at the Sorbonne after 1924 and taught theoretical physics at the Henri Poincaré Institute (1928-62). He was awarded a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1929 and UNESCO's Kalinga Prize in 1952
Michel duke d'Elchingen Ney
born Jan. 10, 1769, Sarrelouis, France died Dec. 7, 1815, Paris French army officer, the best-known of Napoleon's marshals. He distinguished himself in the French Revolutionary Wars and rose to general in 1799. A supporter of Napoleon, he was created marshal of France in 1804 and duke d'Elchingen in 1808 after victories in the Napoleonic Wars. He led French forces in the Battle of Friedland (1807) and at the Battle of Borodino (1812). In the French retreat from Moscow, he courageously commanded the exposed rear guard and earned Napoleon's praise as "the bravest of the brave." After Napoleon's abdication, Ney favoured Louis XVIII but rallied to Napoleon's support in the Hundred Days and commanded troops at the unsuccessful Battle of Waterloo. After the Bourbon Restoration, he was court-martialed and shot by firing squad
Thomas Howard 2nd duke of Norfolk
born 1443 died May 21, 1524, Framlingham, Suffolk, Eng. English noble prominent in the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII. Son of the 1st duke of Norfolk, he was made steward of the royal household and created earl of Surrey in 1483. While fighting for Richard III, he was taken prisoner (and his father killed) in the Battle of Bosworth Field. After his release in 1489, he commanded the defense of the Scottish borders and later defeated the Scots at the Battle of Flodden. Norfolk later served as lord treasurer and a privy councillor, and he helped arrange the marriage of Margaret Tudor to James IV of Scotland. In 1520 he was guardian of England during Henry VIII's absence in France
Thomas Howard 3rd duke of Norfolk
born 1473 died Aug. 25, 1554, Kenninghall, Norfolk, Eng. English noble prominent in the reign of Henry VIII. Son of the 2nd duke of Norfolk, he was made lord high admiral in 1513 and helped rout the Scots at the Battle of Flodden. Succeeding his father as duke (1524), he led the faction opposed to Cardinal Wolsey, whom he replaced as president of the royal council in 1529. He supported the marriage of his niece Anne Boleyn to Henry (1533), but later (as lord high steward) he presided over her trial (1536). He skillfully suppressed the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion and by 1540 was the most powerful of Henry's councillors. His position weakened after his niece Catherine Howard was put to death (1542) and his son Henry Howard (1517-47) was executed for treason. Imprisoned as an accessory to his son, he was released by Queen Mary in 1553
Thomas Howard 4th duke of Norfolk
born March 10, 1538, Kenninghall, Norfolk, Eng. died June 2, 1572, London English noble executed for his intrigues against Queen Elizabeth I. He was the grandson of the 3rd duke of Norfolk, whom he succeeded as duke in 1554. In favour with both Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, Norfolk commanded the English forces that invaded Scotland in 1559-60. He led the commission to resolve problems between Mary, Queen of Scots, and Scotland's Protestant nobility (1568). He became involved in a plan to free Mary from imprisonment by marrying her and was arrested after a failed revolt by Catholic nobles (1569). Released in 1570, Norfolk was drawn into another plot to install Mary on the English throne through a Spanish invasion of England; discovery of the plot led to his arrest and execution
Thomas Pelham-Holles 1st duke of Newcastle
born July 21, 1693 died Nov. 17, 1768, London, Eng. British politician. He inherited lands from his father and uncle that by 1714 made him one of the wealthiest Whig landowners in England. He helped bring about the succession of George I, for which he received the title of duke (1715). Chosen by Robert Walpole as secretary of state, he served from 1724 to 1754, then succeeded his brother Henry Pelham as prime minister (1754-56, 1757-62). Noted for his skill in distributing patronage to secure parliamentary support for a particular ministry, Newcastle wielded great political influence in the reigns of George I and George II
Thomas Pelham-Holles 1st duke of Newcastle -under-Lyme
born July 21, 1693 died Nov. 17, 1768, London, Eng. British politician. He inherited lands from his father and uncle that by 1714 made him one of the wealthiest Whig landowners in England. He helped bring about the succession of George I, for which he received the title of duke (1715). Chosen by Robert Walpole as secretary of state, he served from 1724 to 1754, then succeeded his brother Henry Pelham as prime minister (1754-56, 1757-62). Noted for his skill in distributing patronage to secure parliamentary support for a particular ministry, Newcastle wielded great political influence in the reigns of George I and George II
Vernon Duke
orig. Vladimir (Aleksandrovich) Dukelsky born Oct. 10, 1903, Parfyanovka, near Pskov, Russia died Jan. 16, 1969, Santa Monica, Calif., U.S. Russian-born U.S. composer. He fled Russia at age 16, settling in Constantinople. From there he visited the U.S., where George Gershwin suggested his new name and advised him not to be afraid of "going low-brow." He composed classical works in Europe, including Zéphyr et Flore (1925) for the Ballets Russes but returned to the U.S. in 1929. With lyricists including Edgar Harburg and Howard Dietz, he wrote music for shows (including Walk a Little Faster, 1932) and movies (including Cabin in the Sky, 1943, and Sadie Thompson, 1944). His songs include "April in Paris," "Taking a Chance on Love," and "Banjo Eyes
William Cavendish 1st duke of Newcastle
born 1593 died Dec. 25, 1676, Welbeck, Nottinghamshire, Eng. British Royalist commander in the English Civil Wars. Through inheritances and royal favour, he became very wealthy. In 1642 he was given command of the four northern English counties and raised the siege of York (1642). After the Royalist defeat at the Battle of Marston Moor, he left England for France and Holland. He returned at the Restoration and regained his estates. A patron of poets and dramatists, he also wrote several comedies
William Cavendish 1st duke of Newcastle -upon-Tyne
born 1593 died Dec. 25, 1676, Welbeck, Nottinghamshire, Eng. British Royalist commander in the English Civil Wars. Through inheritances and royal favour, he became very wealthy. In 1642 he was given command of the four northern English counties and raised the siege of York (1642). After the Royalist defeat at the Battle of Marston Moor, he left England for France and Holland. He returned at the Restoration and regained his estates. A patron of poets and dramatists, he also wrote several comedies
dine with duke humphrey
have no dinner to eat or go to (named for the avenue in London where Duke Humphrey Gluster is buried)
dukedom
the domain controlled by a duke or duchess
dukedom
a region ruled by a duke or duchess; a duchy
dukedom
{i} lands owned by a duke
dukedom
The territory of a duke
dukedom
the dignity or rank or position of a duke
dukedom
The title or dignity of a duke
dukedom
A dukedom is the rank or title of a duke. the present heir to the dukedom
dukedom
A dukedom is the land owned by a duke
dukes
{i} fists (Slang)
dukes
plural of duke
grand duke
nobleman or prince who rules a territory; Russian noble, son or grandson of a Russan tsar; uncle or nephew of a Russian noble
grand duke
a prince who rules a territory
Türkisch - Englisch

Definition von duke im Türkisch Englisch wörterbuch

duke testi
(Tıp) duke test
duke

    Silbentrennung

    Duke

    Türkische aussprache

    duk

    Aussprache

    /ˈdo͞ok/ /ˈduːk/

    Etymologie

    [ dük also dyük ] (noun.) 12th century. From Old French duc, from Latin dux.

    Gemeinsame Collocations

    duke out

    Videos

    ... like at different colleges, at Duke, at Howard, Georgetown, ...

    Wort des Tages

    clamant
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