dale

listen to the pronunciation of dale
Englisch - Türkisch
{i} dere
vadi

Bir rüzgar esintisi Curdken'in şapkasını uçurdu, ve o onu tepe ve vadinin üzerinde kovalamak zorunda kaldı. - A gust of wind blew Curdken's hat away, and he had to chase it over hill and dale.

{i} küçük vadi
geniş vadi
up hill and down dale
(deyim) baştan sona
hill and dale recording
inişli çıkışlı kaydetme
up hill and down dale
dere tepe
dales
vadiler
go up hill and down dale
dere tepe düz gitmek
Englisch - Englisch
A surname for someone living in a dale
A male given name transferred from the surname
a valley in an otherwise hilly area
{n} a vale, valley, space between two hills
derived from the surname
A surname from the English noun dale
{i} valley, vale
A dale is a valley. British physiologist. He shared a 1936 Nobel Prize for work on the chemical transmission of nerve impulses. English-born naval commander and colonial administrator noted for his strict rule of Virginia from 1611 to 1616. A valley: galloped over hill and dale. a valley - used in the past or in the names of places, especially in the North of England. Carnegie Dale Dale Carnegey Earnhardt Ralph Dale Owen Robert Dale Tubb Ernest Dale
an open river valley (in a hilly area)
A low place between hills; a vale or valley
A trough or spout to carry off water, as from a pump
Dale Carnegie
orig. Dale Carnegey born Nov. 24, 1888, Maryville, Mo., U.S. died Nov. 1, 1955, Forest Hills, N.Y. U.S. lecturer and author. Born into poverty, he worked as a traveling salesman and an actor before he began teaching public speaking at a YMCA in New York City in 1912. His classes were extremely successful, and he was soon lecturing to packed houses. To standardize his teaching methods he began publishing pamphlets, which he collected into book form as Public Speaking: A Practical Course for Business Men (1926). His hugely popular How To Win Friends and Influence People (1936) won him a national following; like most of his books, it reveals little that was unknown about human psychology but stresses that an individual's attitude is crucial. The Dale Carnegie Institute subsequently established hundreds of chapters throughout the country
Dale Carnegie
{i} (1888-1955) United States writer and educator of courses in self-improvement and corporate training programs
Dale Earnhardt
born April 29, 1951, Kannapolis, N.C., U.S. died Feb. 18, 2001, Daytona, Fla. U.S. automobile racer. He earned Rookie of the Year honours on the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing's Winston Cup series in 1979. In his career he drove to seven Winston Cup titles (1980, 1986-87, 1990-91, 1993-94), equaling the mark of Richard Petty. Earnhardt gained a reputation as an aggressive driver and became known as "the Intimidator." He died from injuries suffered in a crash during the final lap of the 2001 Daytona 500
Dales
The Yorkshire Dales, an upland area, in Northern England
up hill and down dale
Here and there; everywhere
Allan-a-Dale
a character who is a member of Robin Hood 's group, who is also a musician
Dales
the Dales an area of broad, open valleys and hills in northern England. Many tourists visit the Dales
Dales
The Yorkshire Dales is also known as the Dales It is the name given to an upland area, in Northern England
Ernest Dale Tubb
born Feb. 9, 1914, Crisp, Texas, U.S. died Sept. 6, 1984, Nashville, Tenn. U.S. country music singer and songwriter. His first musical influence was the yodeling of Jimmie Rodgers. He became one of the earliest exponents of honky-tonk with hits such as "I'm Walking the Floor over You" (1941). He joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1942, and he became one of the first musicians to record in Nashville. He was a pioneer of the electric guitar in the early 1950s. His Nashville radio program, Midnight Jamboree (from 1947), helped launch many stars, including the Everly Brothers and Elvis Presley. In 1947 he starred in the first country music show at Carnegie Hall
Ralph Dale Earnhardt
born April 29, 1951, Kannapolis, N.C., U.S. died Feb. 18, 2001, Daytona, Fla. U.S. automobile racer. He earned Rookie of the Year honours on the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing's Winston Cup series in 1979. In his career he drove to seven Winston Cup titles (1980, 1986-87, 1990-91, 1993-94), equaling the mark of Richard Petty. Earnhardt gained a reputation as an aggressive driver and became known as "the Intimidator." He died from injuries suffered in a crash during the final lap of the 2001 Daytona 500
Robert Dale Owen
born Nov. 9, 1801, Glasgow, Scot. died June 24, 1877, Lake George, N.Y., U.S. U.S. social reformer. In 1825 he emigrated with his father, Robert Owen, to establish a community at New Harmony, Ind. He edited the local newspaper, the New Harmony Gazette, until 1827, when he became associated with Fanny Wright. The two eventually settled in New York City, where Owen edited the Free Enquirer, and both were active in the Workingmen's Party. Owen returned to New Harmony in 1832. After serving in the Indiana legislature, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives (1843-47), where he introduced a bill establishing the Smithsonian Institution. He later served as U.S. minister to Italy (1855-58). A strong advocate of emancipation, he urged an end to slavery in an 1861 letter to Abraham Lincoln that was said to have influenced the president greatly
dales
plural of dale
up hill and down dale
all over an area; with vigor and perseverance
dale

    Türkische aussprache

    deyl

    Synonyme

    dell, dells, vale, valley

    Aussprache

    /ˈdāl/ /ˈdeɪl/

    Etymologie

    [ 'dA(&)l ] (noun.) before 12th century. Middle English dale, from Old English dæl, from Proto-Germanic *dalan. Cognate with Dutch dal, German Tal, Swedish dal.

    Wort des Tages

    abdicate
Favoriten