buckram

listen to the pronunciation of buckram
Englisch - Englisch
A plant, Allium ursinum, also called ramson or wild garlic
To stiffen with or as if with buckram
A coarse cloth of linen or hemp, stiffened with size or glue, used in garments to keep them in the form intended, and for wrappers to cover merchandise

1882: Buckram was probably from the first a stiffened material employed for lining, often dyed. — James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, p. 557.

{n} a coarse cloth stiffened with glue
Cheap, low-textured, cotton cloth, heavily sized Used for linings in skirting, in the millinery and suiting trades, and in book-binding Sturdy in feel, stiff and boardy
Made of buckram; as, a buckram suit
stiffen with or as with buckram; "buckram the skirt"
Coarse woven fabric stiffened with glue, used to stabilize fabric for stitching Commonly used in caps to hold the front panel upright
a stiff-finished heavily sized fabric of cotton or linen used for interlinings in garments, for stiffening in millinery, and in bookbinding Softens with heat Can be shaped while warm Name from Bokhara in Southern Russia, where it was first made Also called crinoline book muslin or book binding
Coarse-woven fabric stiffened with glue, used to stabilize items for embroidery Commonly used in caps
a coarse cotton fabric stiffened with glue; used in bookbinding and to stiffen clothing stiffen with or as with buckram; "buckram the skirt
— Coarse, woven fabric, stiffened with glue, used to stabilize fabric for stitching Commonly used in caps to hold the front panel erect
Liner which adds support to the front of a cap
A plant
a hard wearing cloth of linen or cotton
rigidly formal; "a starchy manner"; "the letter was stiff and formal"; "his prose has a buckram quality"
Coarse, woven fabric, stiffened with glue, used to stabilize fabric for stitching Commonly used in caps to hold the front panel erect
Fibre: Cotton, some in linen, synthetics Weave: Plain Characteristics: Cheap, low-textured, loose weave, very heavily sized and stiff Also, 2 fabrics are glued together; one is open weave and the other much finer Some is also made in linen in a single fabric Also called crinoline book muslin or bookbinding Name from Bokhara in Southern Russia, where it was first made Uses: Used for interlinings and all kinds of stiffening in clothes, book binding, and for millinery (because it can be moistened and shaped) Used to give stiffness to leather garments not as stiff and often coloured is called "tarlatan" Softens with heat Can be shaped while warm
A coarse sized cloth used in the bookbinding process
Stiff; precise
Strong and expensive book-covering material, made from woven linen or a mixture of linen and cotton
A heavy-weave cotton base fabric which is pyroxylin-filled and used for constructing covers
stiff cloth, used in the past for covering books and making the stiff parts of clothes
A coarse linen cloth which is used for binding
{i} thick heavy cotton fabric (used in bookbinding)
a coarse cotton fabric stiffened with glue; used in bookbinding and to stiffen clothing
A plant. See Ramson. Dr. Prior
To strengthen with buckram; to make stiff
buckram

    Silbentrennung

    buck·ram

    Aussprache

    Etymologie

    [ 'b&-kr&m ] (noun.) 15th century. From Middle English bukeram (“fine linen”), from Anglo-Norman bokeram, from Old French boquerant, bougherant (“fine cloth”), bougueran, probably ultimately from Bokhara.

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