anthony

listen to the pronunciation of anthony
Italienisch - Türkisch
recai
Englisch - Englisch
A patronymic surname
A male given name, in regular use since the Middle Ages

She was built like a dream and wore a chain around her neck with a medal of Saint Anthony hanging down inside the most beautiful bosom I never saw. It must be a terrible temptation for Saint Anthony, I joked - just to put her at ease, you know. Saint Anthony? her husband said. Who's Saint Anthony?.

Amputees, Faith in the Blessed Sacrament
{i} male first name
most famously held by the Roman general Mark Antony, and by Saint Anthony (ca.251-356), an Egyptian hermit
Roman general under Julius Caesar in the Gallic wars; repudiated his wife for the Egyptian queen Cleopatra; they were defeated by Octavian at Actium (83-30 BC)
American feminist leader and suffragist who was instrumental in the passage of legislation that gave married women legal rights over their children, property, and wages. In 1869 she cofounded the National Woman Suffrage Association. Anthony of Egypt Saint Anthony of Padua Saint Anthony Susan Brownell Babington Anthony Anthony Dominick Benedetto Anthony Charles Lynton Blunt Anthony Frederick Burgess Anthony John Anthony Burgess Wilson Comstock Anthony Diemen Anthony van Drexel Anthony Joseph Dummett Sir Michael Anthony Eardley Eden Robert Anthony 1st earl of Avon Fokker Anthony Foyt Anthony Joseph Jr. Froude James Anthony Hopkins Sir Anthony Lido Anthony Iacocca Kennedy Anthony McLeod Chloe Anthony Wofford Perkins Anthony Powell Anthony Dymoke Quinn Anthony Rudolph Oaxaca Samuelson Paul Anthony Shaftesbury Anthony Ashley Cooper 1st earl of Shaftesbury Anthony Ashley Cooper 3rd earl of Shaftesbury Anthony Ashley Cooper 7th earl of Stone Robert Anthony Trollope Anthony Van Dyck Sir Anthony Wayne Anthony Stokowski Leopold Anthony
Anthony (St ) Patron saint of swineherds, because he always lived in woods and forests
United States suffragist (1820-1906)
infertility
Anthony pig
The favourite or smallest pig in the litter. (1811 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue)

*English Chronicle, Cotton. MS., Claudius, A. viii., f. 7 10. An Anthony pig was the smallest or favourite of the little, so tame that it would follow people in the hope of food.

Anthony 1st earl of Avon Eden
born June 12, 1897, Windlestone, Durham, Eng. died Jan. 14, 1977, Alvediston, Wiltshire British politician. After combat service in World War I, he was elected to the House of Commons in 1923. He became foreign secretary in 1935 but resigned in 1938 to protest Neville Chamberlain's policy of appeasement. He held the post again in 1940-45 and in 1951-55, and he helped to settle the Anglo-Iranian oil dispute and arranged an armistice in Indochina. Succeeding Winston Churchill as prime minister in 1955, he attempted to ease international tension by welcoming to Britain Nikita Khrushchev and Nikolay A. Bulganin of the Soviet Union. His fall began when Egypt seized the Suez Canal and he supported an Anglo-French intervention in Egypt (see Suez Crisis). He resigned in 1957, citing ill health
Anthony Ashley Cooper 1st earl of Shaftesbury
born July 22, 1621, Wimborne St. Giles, Dorset, Eng. died Jan. 21, 1683, Amsterdam, Neth. English politician. He served in the English Civil Wars, fighting first for the king (1643) and then for Parliament (1644). He was appointed by Oliver Cromwell to the council of state (1653-54, 1659) and also served in Parliament (1654-60). One of 12 commissioners sent to invite Charles II to return to England, he was appointed to Charles's privy council (1660) and served as chancellor of the Exchequer (1661-72) and lord chancellor (1672-73). As head of the Council of Trade and Foreign Plantations (1672-74), he drew up a constitution for the North American province of Carolina, aided by his protégé John Locke. Dismissed by Charles for supporting the anti-Catholic Test Act and opposing the marriage of Charles's brother James (later James II) to another Catholic, Shaftesbury became a leader of the Whig opposition. He exploited the political chaos caused by Titus Oates to consolidate his parliamentary power and tried unsuccessfully to pass the Exclusion Bill, to keep James from the throne. In 1681 Charles dissolved the Parliament; Shaftesbury was arrested and tried for treason but was acquitted. In 1682 he fled to Holland, where he died
Anthony Ashley Cooper 3rd earl of Shaftesbury
born Feb. 26, 1671, London, Eng. died Feb. 15, 1713, Naples English politician and philosopher. Grandson of the 1st earl of Shaftesbury, he received his early education from John Locke. He entered Parliament in 1695; succeeding to his title in 1699, he served three years in the House of Lords. His numerous philosophical essays were influenced by Neoplatonism; published as Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times (1711), they became the chief source of English Deism and influenced writers such as Alexander Pope, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Immanuel Kant
Anthony Ashley Cooper 7th earl of Shaftesbury
born April 28, 1801, London, Eng. died Oct. 1, 1885, Folkestone, Kent English politician and social reformer. When his father succeeded to the earldom in 1811, Cooper became Lord Ashley. As a member of Parliament (1826-51), he opposed the Reform Bill of 1832 but supported Catholic emancipation and repeal of the Corn Laws. From 1833 he led the factory reform movement in Parliament and effected passage of the Mines Act (1842) and the Ten Hours Act (1847), known as Lord Ashley's Act, which shortened the working day in textile mills. As president of the Ragged Schools Union (1843-83), he promoted the free education of destitute children. Succeeding to his father's title in 1851, he continued his work as one of the most effective social reformers of 19th-century England. He also led the Evangelical movement within the Church of England and financially supported several missionary societies
Anthony Babington
born October 1561, Dethick, Derbyshire, Eng. died Sept. 20, 1586, London English conspirator. Raised secretly as a Catholic, Babington was joined by the priest John Ballard in the unsuccessful "Babington Plot" to assassinate Queen Elizabeth I and install her prisoner, Mary, Queen of Scots, on the English throne. The conspiracy included many Roman Catholics, and Philip II of Spain promised to provide immediate assistance after the assassination. Babington was imprisoned and executed after the interception of an exchange of letters with Mary explaining his plans. The letters were also used as evidence supporting the execution of Mary the following year
Anthony Benedetto
orig. Anthony (Dominick) Benedetto born Aug. 3, 1926, Astoria, Queens, N.Y., U.S. U.S. popular singer. His first job was as a singing waiter, and he later sang under the name Joe Bari. In 1949 Pearl Bailey asked him to join her nightclub revue, and in 1950 Bob Hope suggested his new name. He had many hits in the 1950s, but "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" (1962) became his signature song. His style grew increasingly jazz-oriented over the years, and in the mid-1990s a special appearance on MTV heralded his comeback
Anthony Blunt
a British man who was an art historian and director of the Courtauld Institute of Art. In 1979 it was found out that he was a spy for the Soviet Union when he was a student and during World War II, when he worked in British Intelligence (1907-1983). born Sept. 26, 1907, Bournemouth, Hampshire, Eng. died March 26, 1983, London British art historian and spy. He began his espionage for the Soviet Union after meeting Guy Burgess at the University of Cambridge in the 1930s. From 1937 Blunt had a brilliant career as an art historian, publishing scores of scholarly works that largely established art history in Britain. In World War II he served in British military intelligence and also gave secret information to the Soviets. In 1945 he was appointed surveyor of the king's (later queen's) pictures, and in 1947 he became director of the prestigious Courtauld Institute. He ceased active intelligence work but in 1951 arranged for the escape of Burgess and Donald Maclean (1913-1983) from Britain. In 1964, after the defection of Kim Philby, Blunt was confronted by British authorities and secretly confessed his Soviet connections. When his past as the "fourth man" in the spy ring was made public in 1979, he was stripped of the knighthood awarded him in 1956
Anthony Burgess
{i} (1917-1993) English writer who wrote the novel "A Clockwork Orange
Anthony Burgess
orig. John Anthony Burgess Wilson born Feb. 25, 1917, Manchester, Eng. died Nov. 22, 1993, London English novelist, critic, and composer. His experiences in Southeast Asia produced the novel trilogy The Long Day Wanes (1956-59). A Clockwork Orange (1962; film, 1971), his most original work, is a satire on extreme political systems. His other novels, which combine mordant wit, moral seriousness, verbal dexterity, and the bizarre, include The Wanting Seed (1962), Inside Mr. Enderby (1963), and Earthly Powers (1980). In addition to his extensive literary criticism, biographies, and works on linguistics and music, he composed more than 65 musical works
Anthony Charles Lynton Blair
{i} Tony Blair (born 1953), British politician and Labor party leader who served as Prime Minister of Britain from 1997 to June 2007
Anthony Comstock
born March 7, 1844, New Canaan, Conn., U.S. died Sept. 21, 1915, New York, N.Y. U.S. social reformer. He was an early agitator against abortion and pornography, lobbying successfully for the enactment (1873) of a severe federal statute outlawing the transportation of obscene matter in the mails (the Comstock Law). In that same year, he founded the Society for the Suppression of Vice, which he directed until his death. As a special agent of the U.S. Post Office (1873-1915), he conducted spectacular raids on publishers and vendors. His books include Traps for the Young (1883) and Morals Versus Art (1888)
Anthony Dominick Benedetto
orig. Anthony (Dominick) Benedetto born Aug. 3, 1926, Astoria, Queens, N.Y., U.S. U.S. popular singer. His first job was as a singing waiter, and he later sang under the name Joe Bari. In 1949 Pearl Bailey asked him to join her nightclub revue, and in 1950 Bob Hope suggested his new name. He had many hits in the 1950s, but "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" (1962) became his signature song. His style grew increasingly jazz-oriented over the years, and in the mid-1990s a special appearance on MTV heralded his comeback
Anthony Dymoke Powell
born Dec. 21, 1905, London, Eng. died March 28, 2000, near Frome, Somerset British novelist. He published his first novel, Afternoon Men (1931), while working in a London publishing house. He worked in journalism and served in World War II before publishing the first of 12 novels in the autobiographical and satiric series A Dance to the Music of Time (1951-75). His best-known work, it reflects his outlook and experiences of English society in the decades before and after the war. His later novels include The Fisher King (1986)
Anthony Fokker
orig. Anton Herman Gerard Fokker born April 6, 1890, Kediri, Java, Netherlands East Indies died Dec. 23, 1939, New York, N.Y., U.S. Dutch-U.S. aircraft designer and manufacturer. He built his first plane in 1910 and taught himself to fly. In 1912 he established a small aircraft factory near Berlin. In World War I he produced over 40 types of airplanes for Germany, having originally offered his designs to both sides. He also developed a gear system that allowed a machine gun to fire through a spinning propeller's field. In 1922 he moved to the U.S. and opened an aircraft factory, where he produced numerous commercial aircraft that were used in the newly developing U.S. airlines business
Anthony Fokker
{i} Anthony Herman Gerard Fokker (1890-1939), Dutch born United States airplane manufacturer who established the Fokker Aircraft Corporation of America
Anthony Frederick Blunt
born Sept. 26, 1907, Bournemouth, Hampshire, Eng. died March 26, 1983, London British art historian and spy. He began his espionage for the Soviet Union after meeting Guy Burgess at the University of Cambridge in the 1930s. From 1937 Blunt had a brilliant career as an art historian, publishing scores of scholarly works that largely established art history in Britain. In World War II he served in British military intelligence and also gave secret information to the Soviets. In 1945 he was appointed surveyor of the king's (later queen's) pictures, and in 1947 he became director of the prestigious Courtauld Institute. He ceased active intelligence work but in 1951 arranged for the escape of Burgess and Donald Maclean (1913-1983) from Britain. In 1964, after the defection of Kim Philby, Blunt was confronted by British authorities and secretly confessed his Soviet connections. When his past as the "fourth man" in the spy ring was made public in 1979, he was stripped of the knighthood awarded him in 1956
Anthony Herman Gerard Fokker
{i} (1890-1939) Dutch born United States airplane manufacturer who established the Fokker Aircraft Corporation of America
Anthony Hopkins
{i} (born 1937) Welsh-British stage and movie actor, winner of the 1992 Academy Award for Best Leading Actor for his role in "Silence of the Lambs
Anthony J Drexel
born Sept. 13, 1826, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died June 30, 1893, Carlsbad, Bohemia U.S. banker and philanthropist. He and his brothers inherited his father's Philadelphia banking house and built it into a successful investment-banking concern, specializing in flotation of government bonds, railroad organization, mining development, and urban real estate. In 1891 he founded the Drexel Institute of Art, Science, and Industry, now Drexel University. He was the uncle of St. Katherine Drexel
Anthony Joseph Drexel
born Sept. 13, 1826, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died June 30, 1893, Carlsbad, Bohemia U.S. banker and philanthropist. He and his brothers inherited his father's Philadelphia banking house and built it into a successful investment-banking concern, specializing in flotation of government bonds, railroad organization, mining development, and urban real estate. In 1891 he founded the Drexel Institute of Art, Science, and Industry, now Drexel University. He was the uncle of St. Katherine Drexel
Anthony Joseph Jr. Foyt
born Jan. 16, 1935, Houston, Texas, U.S. U.S. automobile racing driver. He became the first four-time winner of the Indianapolis 500 (1961, 1964, 1967, 1977) and is the only driver to have won the Indy 500, the Daytona 500, and the Le Mans Grand Prix. He was national champion stock-car driver in 1968, 1978, and 1979, and he also amassed numerous wins in sports-and midget-car racing
Anthony M Kennedy
born July 23, 1936, Sacramento, Calif., U.S. U.S. jurist. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he practiced law in San Francisco and Sacramento before being appointed to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 1975. He was nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1988 by Pres. Ronald Reagan. His record generally reflected his conservative outlook, and he consistently voted against policies such as affirmative action and abortion rights. His episodic departure from conservative jurisprudence stemmed from his civil libertarian perspective on certain individual rights
Anthony McLeod Kennedy
born July 23, 1936, Sacramento, Calif., U.S. U.S. jurist. A graduate of Harvard Law School, he practiced law in San Francisco and Sacramento before being appointed to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 1975. He was nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1988 by Pres. Ronald Reagan. His record generally reflected his conservative outlook, and he consistently voted against policies such as affirmative action and abortion rights. His episodic departure from conservative jurisprudence stemmed from his civil libertarian perspective on certain individual rights
Anthony Perkins
{i} (1932-1992) American actor famous for his role as Norman Bates, in Alfred Hitchcock's movie "Psycho
Anthony Perkins
born April 4, 1932, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 12, 1992, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. film actor. He was the son of the actor Osgood Perkins, and he studied at Columbia University. After making his screen debut in The Actress (1953), he appeared in films such as Friendly Persuasion (1956) and Fear Strikes Out (1957), but he was best known as the murderous motel owner Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960). He later appeared in several films in Europe, including The Trial (1963), The Champagne Murders (1967), and Ten Days' Wonder (1972), and in U.S. films such as Pretty Poison (1968), Catch-22 (1970), and WUSA (1970). He reprised his role as Norman Bates in three sequels (1983, 1986, and 1990)
Anthony Powell
a British writer who wrote a series of 12 novels A Dance to the Music of Time, which describes the lives of a group of upper-class friends over a long period (1905-2000). born Dec. 21, 1905, London, Eng. died March 28, 2000, near Frome, Somerset British novelist. He published his first novel, Afternoon Men (1931), while working in a London publishing house. He worked in journalism and served in World War II before publishing the first of 12 novels in the autobiographical and satiric series A Dance to the Music of Time (1951-75). His best-known work, it reflects his outlook and experiences of English society in the decades before and after the war. His later novels include The Fisher King (1986)
Anthony Quinn
born April 21, 1915, Chihuahua, Mex. died June 3, 2001, Boston, Mass., U.S. Mexican-born U.S. film actor. He began appearing in movies in 1936, initially playing bit parts as American Indians or ethnic characters. After appearing on Broadway in A Streetcar Named Desire, he returned to Hollywood, where he won Academy Awards for his supporting roles in Viva Zapata! (1952) and Lust for Life (1956). He was noted for his earthy masculinity and acted in over 100 other films, notably Federico Fellini's La strada (1954), Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962), and Zorba the Greek (1964). Quinn was also a successful artist and sculptor
Anthony Rudolph Oaxaca Quinn
born April 21, 1915, Chihuahua, Mex. died June 3, 2001, Boston, Mass., U.S. Mexican-born U.S. film actor. He began appearing in movies in 1936, initially playing bit parts as American Indians or ethnic characters. After appearing on Broadway in A Streetcar Named Desire, he returned to Hollywood, where he won Academy Awards for his supporting roles in Viva Zapata! (1952) and Lust for Life (1956). He was noted for his earthy masculinity and acted in over 100 other films, notably Federico Fellini's La strada (1954), Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962), and Zorba the Greek (1964). Quinn was also a successful artist and sculptor
Anthony Trollope
a British writer whose novels, such as Barchester Towers, are famous for their description of Victorian England (1815-82). born April 24, 1815, London, Eng. died Dec. 6, 1882, London English novelist. He worked for the post office in England and Ireland from 1834 to 1867. Beginning in 1844 he produced 47 novels, writing mainly before breakfast at a fixed rate of 1,000 words an hour. His best-loved and most famous works are the six interconnected Barsetshire novels, including Barchester Towers (1857) and The Last Chronicle of Barset (1867). Depicting the social scene in an imaginary English county, they abound in memorable characters and atmosphere. The Palliser novels, dealing with political issues and featuring the character Plantagenet Palliser, include the sharply satirical The Eustace Diamonds (1872). Other works, such as He Knew He Was Right (1869), show great psychological penetration. The Way We Live Now (1875), with its ironic view of the Victorian upper classes, is especially highly regarded
Anthony Wayne
born Jan. 1, 1745, near Paoli, Pa. died Dec. 15, 1796, Presque Isle, Pa., U.S. American Revolutionary officer. He owned a tannery before he was commissioned a colonel in the Continental Army (1776). He aided the American retreat from Canada and was given command of Fort Ticonderoga (1776). Promoted to brigadier general (1777), he led troops in the battles of the Brandywine, Paoli, and Germantown. He led the successful storming of the British fort at Stony Point, N.Y. (1779), earning the nickname "Mad Anthony" for his boldness. He served in the Siege of Yorktown and later defeated the Indians allied with the British in Georgia. In 1792 Pres. George Washington sent Wayne to fight the Indians in the Ohio Territory, and he decisively ended Indian resistance at the Battle of Fallen Timbers (1794)
Anthony van Diemen
born 1593, Culemborg, Neth. died April 19, 1645, Batavia, Dutch East Indies Dutch colonial administrator who consolidated the Dutch empire in the Far East. He joined the Dutch East India Company and served in Batavia from 1618. As governor-general of the Dutch East Indian settlements (1636-45), he enabled the Dutch to gain a monopoly of the spice trade in the Moluccas, conquer cinnamon-producing areas in Ceylon (Sri Lanka), seize the key Portuguese stronghold of Malacca, and capture all of Formosa (Taiwan). By 1645 he had established the United Provinces of The Netherlands as the paramount commercial and political power in the East Indies. Van Diemen also initiated the exploring expeditions of Abel Janszoon Tasman and Frans Visscher (1642, 1644)
Antony
A male given name, a mostly British spelling variant of Anthony

Which still should go with Antony.

Saint Anthony's cross
A T-shaped cross
Saint Anthony's crosses
plural form of Saint Anthony's cross
Saint Anthony's fire
Any of several inflammatory conditions of the skin, including erysipelas, herpes zoster, and ergotism
Saint Anthony's fires
plural form of Saint Anthony's fire
St. Anthony's cross
Alternative spelling of Saint Anthony's cross
St. Anthony's crosses
plural form of St. Anthony's cross
St. Anthony's fire
A disease characterised by gangrene and a burning sensation in the hands and feet, now usually identified with ergotism
knock Anthony
Said of an in-kneed person, or one whose knees knock together; to cuff Jonas. (1811 Dictionary of Vulgar Tongue)
Antony
tace
Antony
Antony Mark Hewish Antony Tudor Antony
Antony
{i} male first name; family name; Mark Antony (83-30 B.C., Marcus Antonius in Latin), Roman politician and general and friend of Julius Caesar and defeated Julius Caesar's assassins, member of the second triumvirate
Antony
a mostly British spelling variant of Anthony
James Anthony Froude
born April 23, 1818, Dartington, Devon, Eng. died Oct. 20, 1894, Kingsbridge, Devon English historian and biographer. He was influenced by the Oxford Movement, which sought a renewal of Roman Catholic practices within the Church of England, but later broke with it. Among his historical works, which display both carelessness and his anti-Catholic bias, the best known is History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Defeat of the Spanish Armada (1856-70), which fundamentally altered the direction of Tudor studies. Immensely prolific, he was attacked by reviewers but was popular with the reading public. He later produced a biography (1882-84) of his friend Thomas Carlyle
Leopold Anthony Stokowski
orig. Antoni Stanislaw Boleslawawicz Stokowski born April 18, 1882, London, Eng. died Sept. 13, 1977, Nether Wallop, Hampshire British-born U.S. conductor and organist. He studied at the Royal College of Music and the University of Oxford. After holding organist positions and conducting a handful of concerts, he became conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony (1909-12), with great success. From there he moved to the Philadelphia Orchestra, and in the years 1912-38 he made it a world-class ensemble, creating the lush "Philadelphia sound." He programmed much contemporary music, and he grasped very early the importance of recording. He made three films with the Philadelphia Orchestra, including Walt Disney's Fantasia (1940), and he used his fame to help foster fledgling music organizations, including the American Symphony Orchestra, which he formed in 1962. His strong advocacy of new music did much to broaden American musical taste
Lt. Gen. Anthony C. Zinni
(born 1943) senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies; former Commander in Chief of U.S. Central Command
Paul Anthony Samuelson
born May 15, 1915, Gary, Ind., U.S. U.S. economist. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard and taught at Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1940, becoming an emeritus professor in 1986. His Foundations of Economic Analysis (1947) outlines a basic theme of his work, the universal nature of consumer behaviour as the key to economic theory. His studies included the dynamics of economic systems, analyses of public goods, welfare economics, and public expenditure. His most influential work was perhaps his mathematical formulation of multiplier and accelerator effects and, in consumption analysis, his development of the theory of revealed preference. His classic Economics (1948) is the best-selling U.S. economics textbook of all time. For his fundamental contributions to nearly all branches of economics, he became in 1970 the third person to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences
Robert Anthony 1st earl of Avon Eden
born June 12, 1897, Windlestone, Durham, Eng. died Jan. 14, 1977, Alvediston, Wiltshire British politician. After combat service in World War I, he was elected to the House of Commons in 1923. He became foreign secretary in 1935 but resigned in 1938 to protest Neville Chamberlain's policy of appeasement. He held the post again in 1940-45 and in 1951-55, and he helped to settle the Anglo-Iranian oil dispute and arranged an armistice in Indochina. Succeeding Winston Churchill as prime minister in 1955, he attempted to ease international tension by welcoming to Britain Nikita Khrushchev and Nikolay A. Bulganin of the Soviet Union. His fall began when Egypt seized the Suez Canal and he supported an Anglo-French intervention in Egypt (see Suez Crisis). He resigned in 1957, citing ill health
Robert Anthony Stone
born Aug. 21, 1937, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. novelist. He served in the U.S. Navy before attending New York and Stanford universities. Dog Soldiers (1974, National Book Award), his second novel, brought home the corruption of the Vietnam War. His later works include the novels A Flag for Sunrise (1981), Outerbridge Reach (1992), and Damascus Gate (1998) and the short-story collection Bear and His Daughter (1997)
Saint Anthony of Egypt
born 251, Koma, near al-Miny, Heptanomis, Egypt died Jan. 17?, 356, Dayr Mr Antonios hermitage, near the Red Sea; feast day January 17 Egyptian hermit considered the founder of organized Christian monasticism. He began his practice of asceticism at age 20 and lived in solitude on Mount Pispir from 286 to 305. He emerged from his retreat to organize the monastic life of the hermits who had settled nearby. When the Edict of Milan (313) ended the persecution of Christians, Anthony moved to the desert between the Nile and the Red Sea. His monastic rule was compiled from writings and discourses attributed to him in Athanasius's Life of St. Anthony and the Apophthegmata patrum and was still observed in the 20th century by Coptic and Armenian monks. The hellish temptations he endured as a hermit became a popular subject for artists
Saint Anthony of Padua
born 1195, Lisbon, Port. died June 13, 1231, Arcella, Verona; canonized 1232; feast day June 13 Franciscan friar, Doctor of the Church, and patron saint of Portugal. He joined the Augustinian order in 1210 and was probably ordained a priest. He joined the Franciscans in 1220 with the goal of seeking martyrdom among the Muslims but instead became a teacher of theology in Bologna, Italy, and in southern France. The most beloved of the followers of St. Francis, he was known as a great preacher and miracle worker. He was buried in Padua, Italy, and he is the patron of that city. He is also invoked for the return of lost property
Sir Anthony Eden
a British politician in the Conservative Party, who was Prime Minister from 1955 to 1957. He gave up this position after the Suez Crisis, when British military forces failed in an attempt to get back control of the Suez Canal from Egypt (1897-1977)
Sir Anthony Hopkins
born Dec. 31, 1937, Port Talbot, West Glamorgan, Wales British actor. He joined London's National Theatre in 1965, where he starred in Shakespearean roles. A subtle actor able to convey volcanic emotion with a small gesture, he made an acclaimed Broadway debut in Equus (1974). Hopkins stayed on in the U.S. for films such as The Elephant Man (1980) and television productions such as The Bunker (1981, Emmy Award). At the National Theatre he triumphed in King Lear and Antony and Cleopatra. He won an Oscar for his chilling performance as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs (1991), a role he played in two sequels. He also starred in Howards End (1992), The Remains of the Day (1993), and Amistad (1997)
Sir Anthony Van Dyck
Van Dyck, Sir Anthony. a Flemish painter who lived for some time in England, and painted portraits of the British king Charles I and his family (1599-1641). v. born March 22, 1599, Antwerp, Belg. died Dec. 9, 1641, London, Eng. Flemish painter. Son of a well-to-do silk merchant, he was apprenticed to an Antwerp painter at
Sir Anthony Van Dyck
He soon came under the influence of Peter Paul Rubens, for his early works are painted in Rubens's Baroque style, though with darker and warmer colour, more abrupt chiaroscuro, and more angular figures. He was a master in the Antwerp artists' guild by 19, at which time he was also working with Rubens. He spent over five years in Italy (1621-27); on his return, he received many commissions for altarpieces and portraits. He also executed works on mythological subjects and was a fine draftsman and etcher, but he is chiefly known for his portraits, in which he idealized his models without sacrificing their individuality. In Britain in 1632, he was appointed court painter by Charles I. He gained a comfortable income from the many portraits he painted in Britain, and his life matched his clients' in luxury. His influence was pervasive and lasting; Flemish, Dutch, and German portraitists imitated his style and technique, and the 18th-century English portraitists, especially Thomas Gainsborough and Joshua Reynolds, were deeply indebted to him
Sir Anthony Vandyck
{f} (1599-1641) Flemish portrait and religious painter and etcher
Sir Michael Anthony Eardley Dummett
born June 27, 1925, London, Eng. British philosopher. Dummett has done influential work in the philosophy of language, metaphysics, logic, and the philosophy of mathematics; he is also one of the foremost expositors of the work of Gottlob Frege. He is known chiefly for his defense of antirealism (see realism) and his attempt to explicate sentence meaning in terms of "assertibility conditions" rather than truth conditions. His major works include Frege: Philosophy of Language (1973), Truth and Other Enigmas (1978), The Logical Basis of Metaphysics (1991), and The Seas of Language (1993)
Susan B Anthony
born Feb. 15, 1820, Adams, Mass., U.S. died March 13, 1906, Rochester, N.Y. U.S. pioneer in the women's suffrage movement. A precocious child, she learned to read and write at the age of three. After attending a boarding school in Philadelphia, she took a teaching position in a Quaker seminary in upstate New York. She taught at a female academy (1846-49) and then settled in her family home near Rochester, N.Y. There she met many leading abolitionists, including Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison. The rebuff of her attempt to speak at a temperance meeting in Albany in 1852 prompted her to join Elizabeth Cady Stanton in organizing the Woman's State Temperance Society of New York. From this time she was a tireless campaigner for abolition and women's rights. During the early phase of the Civil War she helped organize the Women's National Loyal League, which urged the case for emancipation. After the war, she campaigned unsuccessfully to have the language of the Fourteenth Amendment altered to allow for woman as well as "Negro" suffrage. In 1868 she represented the Working Women's Association of New York, which she had recently organized, at the National Labor Union convention. In January 1869 she organized a woman suffrage convention in Washington, D.C., and in May she and Stanton formed the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). As a test of the legality of the suffrage provision of the Fourteenth Amendment, she cast a vote in the 1872 presidential election in Rochester. She was arrested, convicted (the judge's directed verdict of guilty had been written before the trial began), and fined; though she refused to pay the fine, the case was carried no further. She served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (1892-1900) and lectured throughout the country for a federal women's-suffrage amendment
Susan B. Anthony
(1820-1906) USA political activist and leader of the women's suffrage movement
Susan B. Anthony
a US woman who tried to help women get the right to vote (1820-1906)
Susan Brownell Anthony
born Feb. 15, 1820, Adams, Mass., U.S. died March 13, 1906, Rochester, N.Y. U.S. pioneer in the women's suffrage movement. A precocious child, she learned to read and write at the age of three. After attending a boarding school in Philadelphia, she took a teaching position in a Quaker seminary in upstate New York. She taught at a female academy (1846-49) and then settled in her family home near Rochester, N.Y. There she met many leading abolitionists, including Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison. The rebuff of her attempt to speak at a temperance meeting in Albany in 1852 prompted her to join Elizabeth Cady Stanton in organizing the Woman's State Temperance Society of New York. From this time she was a tireless campaigner for abolition and women's rights. During the early phase of the Civil War she helped organize the Women's National Loyal League, which urged the case for emancipation. After the war, she campaigned unsuccessfully to have the language of the Fourteenth Amendment altered to allow for woman as well as "Negro" suffrage. In 1868 she represented the Working Women's Association of New York, which she had recently organized, at the National Labor Union convention. In January 1869 she organized a woman suffrage convention in Washington, D.C., and in May she and Stanton formed the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). As a test of the legality of the suffrage provision of the Fourteenth Amendment, she cast a vote in the 1872 presidential election in Rochester. She was arrested, convicted (the judge's directed verdict of guilty had been written before the trial began), and fined; though she refused to pay the fine, the case was carried no further. She served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (1892-1900) and lectured throughout the country for a federal women's-suffrage amendment
Todd Anthony Shaw
{i} Too Short (born 1966), United States rapper
antony
Roman general under Julius Caesar in the Gallic wars; repudiated his wife for the Egyptian queen Cleopatra; they were defeated by Octavian at Actium (83-30 BC)
saint anthony's fire
any of several inflammatory or gangrenous skin conditions
susan b anthony dollar
a United States coin worth one dollar
anthony

    Silbentrennung

    An·tho·ny

    Türkische aussprache

    änthıni

    Aussprache

    /ˈanᴛʜənē/ /ˈænθəniː/

    Etymologie

    [ 'an(t)-th&-nE, chiefly ] (biographical name.) From Latin Antonius, name of a Roman gens (with excrescent -h- probably suggested by the many Greek loan words beginning anth-, e.g., άνθος "flower", άνθρωπος "man"). The Roman clan name is of uncertain etymology, but is not Greek or Hebrew; most likely of Etruscan origin.

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