anna

listen to the pronunciation of anna
Englisch - Türkisch
(Hint parası) rupinin on altıda biri
(Hint parası) rupinin on altıda biri
Englisch - Englisch
A female given name

His real name was Leonard, Len. He'd changed it when he came East. Len, he said. A turd of a name. Who wants it? I mean a name that ends in a nasalization, for Christ's sake. Leo now. It's like Anna. They go on forever. You can live with a name like that..

A prophetess who saw the infant Jesus

And there was one Anna, a prophetess, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Aser: she was of great age, and had lived with an husband seven years from her virginity;.

A unit of currency in former British India equal to 12 pies or 1/16 rupee
(Donna) A lady beloved by Don Ottavio, but seduced by Don Giovanni, who also killed her father, the "Commandant of the City," in a duel (Mozart's opera of Don Giovanni )
Food; gross visible matter; in its origin the word meant simply being or substance
{i} female first name; name of a city in Illinois (USA)
grace, an aged widow, the daughter of Phanuel She was a "prophetess," like Miriam, Deborah, and Huldah (2 Chr 34: 22) After seven years of married life her husband died, and during her long widowhood she daily attended the temple services When she was eighty-four years old, she entered the temple at the moment when the aged Simeon uttered his memorable words of praise and thanks to God that he had fulfilled his ancient promise in sending his Son into the world (Luke 2: 36, 37)
a former copper coin of Pakistan
A prophetess who saw the infant Jesus ( Luke 2: 36-38)
food, rice
Ann, the apocryphal mother of Virgin Mary
coin, one-sixteenth the value of a rupee
born Jan. 28, 1693, Moscow, Russia died Oct. 17, 1740, St. Petersburg Empress of Russia (1730-40). After the death of Peter II, the Supreme Privy Council, Russia's actual ruling body, offered Anna the throne (as the daughter of Ivan V) if she agreed to conditions placing the real power in the council's hands. She initially agreed but later tore up the conditions, abolished the council, and reestablished the autocracy, countenancing a severely repressive regime. She occupied herself primarily with extravagant amusements and relied on her lover, Ernst Johann Biron (1690-1772), and a group of German advisers to manage the state. Shortly before her death, Anna named as her successor her grand-nephew Ivan (later Ivan VI). Akhmatova Anna Anna Andreyevna Gorenko Anna Comnena Anna Ivanovna Cecilia Sophia Anna Maria Kalogeropoulos Freud Anna Gilman Charlotte Anna Perkins Stetson Kauffmann Maria Anna Angelica Catharina Anna Lou Leibovitz Magnani Anna Anna Mary Robertson Pavlova Anna Pavlovna Roosevelt Anna Eleanor Santa Anna Antonio López de Sewell Anna Shaw Anna Howard Sokolow Anna Edith Anna Oenone Somerville and Violet Florence Martin
periodically popular as a variant of Ann in English
{i} coin valued at one-seventeenth of an Indian rupee
An East Indian money of account, the sixteenth of a rupee, or about 2&?; cents
Anna Akhmatova
orig. Anna Andreyevna Gorenko born June 23, 1889, Bolshoy Fontan, near Odessa, Ukraine, Russian Empire died March 5, 1966, Domodedovo, near Moscow Russian poet. She won fame with her first poetry collections (1912, 1914). Soon after the Revolution of 1917, Soviet authorities condemned her work for what they perceived as its narrow preoccupation with love and God, and in 1923, after the execution of her former husband on conspiracy charges, she entered a long period of literary silence. After World War II she was again denounced and expelled from the Writers Union. Following Joseph Stalin's death in 1953, she was slowly rehabilitated. In her later years she became the influential centre of a circle of younger Russian poets. Her longest work, Poem Without a Hero, is regarded as one of the great poems of the 20th century. Regarded today as one of the greatest of all Russian poets, she is also admired for her translations of other poets' works and for her memoirs
Anna Comnena
born Dec. 2, 1083 died 1153 Byzantine historian. Daughter of the emperor Alexius I Comnenus, she conspired with her mother against her brother John II Comnenus; when the plot was discovered, she was forced to enter a convent. There she wrote the Alexiad, a biography of her father and a pro-Byzantine account of the early Crusades
Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
born Oct. 11, 1884, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 7, 1962, New York City U.S. first lady and diplomat. The niece of Theodore Roosevelt, she married her distant cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1905. She raised their five children and became active in politics after her husband's polio attack (1921). As first lady (1933-45), she traveled around the U.S. to report on living conditions and public opinion for her husband, and she supported humanitarian causes such as child welfare, equal rights, and social reforms. During World War II, she traveled in Britain and the South Pacific as well as to U.S. military bases to help raise morale. She wrote the syndicated column "My Day," as well as several books. After her husband's death, she was appointed a delegate to the UN (1945, 1949-52, 1961), whose founding she had strongly advocated. As chair of its Commission on Human Rights (1946-51), she helped draft the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948). In the 1950s she traveled around the world for the UN and remained active in the Democratic Party
Anna Freud
born Dec. 3, 1895, Vienna, Austria died Oct. 9, 1982, London, Eng. Austrian-born British psychiatrist, founder of the field of child psychiatry. Daughter of Sigmund Freud, she pioneered in developing psychoanalytic theory and practice. In The Ego and Defense Mechanisms (1936), Freud called repression the principal human defense mechanism. This gave a strong, new impetus to the role of ego in psychology. She and her terminally ill father escaped Nazi-dominated Austria for London in 1938. She co-wrote three books on the effects of war on children. A summation of her thoughts is found in Normality and Pathology in Childhood (1968)
Anna Howard Shaw
born Feb. 14, 1847, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, Eng. died July 2, 1919, Moylan, Pa., U.S. U.S. minister and suffragist. She arrived in the U.S. with her family in 1851. By age 15 she was a frontier schoolteacher, and in 1880 she became the first woman minister of the Methodist Protestant Church. She took up the causes of temperance and woman suffrage in 1885 and became an important spokesperson for both. She earned a medical degree the next year and later served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (1904-15). She performed home-front war work during World War I, for which she received the Distinguished Service Medal in 1919. She died shortly before women gained the right to vote
Anna Ivanovna
born Jan. 28, 1693, Moscow, Russia died Oct. 17, 1740, St. Petersburg Empress of Russia (1730-40). After the death of Peter II, the Supreme Privy Council, Russia's actual ruling body, offered Anna the throne (as the daughter of Ivan V) if she agreed to conditions placing the real power in the council's hands. She initially agreed but later tore up the conditions, abolished the council, and reestablished the autocracy, countenancing a severely repressive regime. She occupied herself primarily with extravagant amusements and relied on her lover, Ernst Johann Biron (1690-1772), and a group of German advisers to manage the state. Shortly before her death, Anna named as her successor her grand-nephew Ivan (later Ivan VI)
Anna Karenina
a book by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy which many people think is one of the greatest novels ever written. It tells the story of a married woman called Anna Karenina who falls in love with a young army officer
Anna Magnani
born March 7, 1908, Rome, Italy died Sept. 26, 1973, Rome Italian film actress. An illegitimate child brought up in poverty, she became a nightclub singer noted for her bawdy street songs. After acting in a touring company, she made her film debut in The Blind Woman of Sorrento (1934). She earned international fame for her role in Roberto Rossellini's Open City (1945). She became known for her forceful portrayals of earthy, working-class women in films such as The Miracle (1948), Bellissima (1951), The Rose Tattoo (1955, Academy Award), The Fugitive Kind (1960), and Mamma Roma (1962)
Anna Pavlova
a Russian ballet dancer especially famous for her dancing of The Dying Swan. Many people consider her to have been the world's greatest ballet dancer (1885-1931). born Feb. 12, 1881, St. Petersburg, Russia died Jan. 23, 1931, The Hague, Neth. Russian ballet dancer. She studied at the Imperial Ballet School from 1891 and joined the Mariinsky Theatre company in 1899, becoming prima ballerina in 1906. In 1913 she left Russia to tour with her own company, which showcased her outstanding performances in classical ballets such as Giselle; the most famous numbers were a succession of short solos such as The Dying Swan, choreographed for her by Michel Fokine. Her tours took ballet to audiences in many countries for the first time and did much to popularize ballet worldwide
Anna Pavlovna Pavlova
born Feb. 12, 1881, St. Petersburg, Russia died Jan. 23, 1931, The Hague, Neth. Russian ballet dancer. She studied at the Imperial Ballet School from 1891 and joined the Mariinsky Theatre company in 1899, becoming prima ballerina in 1906. In 1913 she left Russia to tour with her own company, which showcased her outstanding performances in classical ballets such as Giselle; the most famous numbers were a succession of short solos such as The Dying Swan, choreographed for her by Michel Fokine. Her tours took ballet to audiences in many countries for the first time and did much to popularize ballet worldwide
Anna Sewell
born March 30, 1820, Yarmouth, Norfolk, Eng. died April 25, 1878, Old Catton, Norfolk British writer. She was introduced to writing by her mother, an author of juvenile best-sellers, and her concern for the humane treatment of horses began early in life. Confined to her house as an invalid, she spent her last years writing the children's classic Black Beauty (1877), a fictional autobiography of a gentle, highbred horse. It had a strong moral purpose and is said to have been instrumental in abolishing the cruel practice of using the checkrein (a short rein used to prevent a horse from lowering its head)
Anna Sokolow
born Feb. 9, 1910, Hartford, Conn., U.S. died March 29, 2000, New York, N.Y. U.S. modern dancer, choreographer, and teacher. She studied with Martha Graham and danced with Graham's company (1930-38). In the early 1930s she also formed her own dance group, the Dance Unit. From 1939 to 1949 she spent part of each year as a teacher and choreographer in Mexico City, where she formed Mexico's first modern-dance group. Throughout her career and into the 1990s, she continued to form various companies and for them she often choreographed works on subjects of social concern
Antonio López de Santa Anna
born Feb. 21, 1794, Jalapa, Mex. died June 21, 1876, Mexico City Soldier and several times president of Mexico (1833-36, 1844-45, 1847, 1853-55). He fought on both sides of nearly every issue of the day. He is famous for his glorious victories, including his thwarting of Spain's attempt to reconquer Mexico (1829), and for his ignominious failures, including his defeat and capture by Sam Houston at San Jacinto in the Texas revolt (1836). When the Mexican War broke out, he contacted Pres. James K. Polk to broker a peace, but on arriving in Mexico he led Mexican forces against the U.S. (1846-47) and was driven into exile. When Maximilian was made emperor of Mexico, Santa Anna offered his services both to Maximilian and to his opponents; neither side accepted. He lived abroad 1855-74, finally returning to Mexico to die in poverty. See also Alamo; caudillo; La Reforma
Antonio Santa Anna
born Feb. 21, 1794, Jalapa, Mex. died June 21, 1876, Mexico City Soldier and several times president of Mexico (1833-36, 1844-45, 1847, 1853-55). He fought on both sides of nearly every issue of the day. He is famous for his glorious victories, including his thwarting of Spain's attempt to reconquer Mexico (1829), and for his ignominious failures, including his defeat and capture by Sam Houston at San Jacinto in the Texas revolt (1836). When the Mexican War broke out, he contacted Pres. James K. Polk to broker a peace, but on arriving in Mexico he led Mexican forces against the U.S. (1846-47) and was driven into exile. When Maximilian was made emperor of Mexico, Santa Anna offered his services both to Maximilian and to his opponents; neither side accepted. He lived abroad 1855-74, finally returning to Mexico to die in poverty. See also Alamo; caudillo; La Reforma
Charlotte Anna Perkins Stetson Gilman
born July 3, 1860, Hartford, Conn., U.S. died Aug. 17, 1935, Pasadena, Calif. U.S. feminist theorist, writer, and lecturer. She gained worldwide fame as a lecturer on women, ethics, labour, and society. In her best-known work, Women and Economics (1898), she proposed that women's sexual and maternal roles had been overemphasized to the detriment of their social and economic potential and that only economic independence could bring true freedom. Her other works include the celebrated short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" (1899)
Freiin von Droste zu Hülshoff Anna Elisabeth Franziska Adolphine Wilhelmine Loui
orig. Anna Elisabeth Franziska Adolphine Wilhelmine Louise Maria, Freiin von Droste zu Hülshoff born Jan. 10, 1797, Schloss Hülshoff, near Münster, Westphalia died May 25, 1848, Meersburg, Baden German writer. One of the great women poets of Germany, she wrote religious verse, particularly Das geistliche Jahr (1851; "The Spiritual Year"), but she is best known for detailed, evocative poems about her native Westphalia. Her stories are considered forerunners of the 19th-century realistic short story. Her only complete prose work, The Jew's Beech (1842), is a psychological study of a villager who murders a Jew
Maria Anna Angelica Catharina Kauffmann
born Oct. 30, 1741, Chur, Switz. died Nov. 5, 1807, Rome, Papal States Swiss-born Italian painter. She began studying art in Italy as a child, showing great precocity, and in 1766 her friend Joshua Reynolds took her to London. There she became known for her decorative work with architects such as Robert Adam. Her pastoral compositions incorporate delicate and graceful depictions of gods and goddesses; though her paintings are Rococo in tone and approach, her figures are Neoclassical (see Classicism and Neoclassicism). Her portraits of female sitters are among her finest works. After marrying the painter Antonio Zucchi (1726-95), she returned to Italy in 1781
Santa Anna
city in southwest California
santa anna
Mexican general who tried to crush the Texas revolt and who lost battles to Winfield Scott and Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War (1795-1876)
anna

    Silbentrennung

    an·na

    Türkische aussprache

    änı

    Aussprache

    /ˈanə/ /ˈænə/

    Etymologie

    [ 'ä-n& ] (noun.) 1708. From Hindi ānā.

    Videos

    ... parents; Ann's dad was born in Wales and is a first-generation American. We welcome ...

    Wort des Tages

    identic
Favoriten