dame

listen to the pronunciation of dame
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} anaokulu müdiresi
{i} argo kadın
{i} eski hanım, hatun, yaşlı kadın
kadın
{i} hanım
{i} bayan
{i} kadınlara verilen şövalyelik ayarında bir asalet unvanı
{i} yaşlı kadın
{i} dam (asalet ünvanı)
{i} karı
hatun
{i} anaokulu
kibar kadın
dame fortune
Kör tâlih, kötü kader
dame nature
tabiat ana
step-dame
adım kadın
DAMES
(Askeri) Savunma Otomatik Adresleme Sistemi (DAAS), otomatik mesaj mübadele sistemi (defense automatic addressing system (DAAS) automated message exchange system)
Türkçe - Türkçe
Tarafsız noktalar
İngilizce - İngilizce
Lady, woman
Slightly derogatory way of referring to a woman

There ain't nothin' like a dame!.

the equivalent title to Sir for a female knight

Dame Edith Sitwell.

{n} a lady, a woman in general
A mother; applied to human beings and quadrupeds
A mistress of a family, who is a lady; a woman in authority; especially, a lady
A neutral point, of no value to either player
a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
A woman in general, esp
I hate this flute!
Designated Aviation Medical Examiner
Dame is a title given to a woman as a special honour because of important service or work that she has done. Dame Judi Dench
division airspace management element
Wrong, bad, incorrect
older woman, used sometimes as a mode of address
Used formerly as a courtesy title for a woman in authority or a mistress of a household A married woman; a matron; an elderly woman (as stated on Dictionary com)
A dame is a woman. This use could cause offence. Who does that dame think she is?. a British title given to a woman as an honour for achievement or for doing good things. Anderson Dame Judith Andrews Dame Julie Ashcroft Dame Peggy Cartland Dame Mary Barbara Hamilton Christie Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Compton Burnett Dame Ivy Cooper Dame Gladys de Valois Dame Ninette Dench Dame Judith Olivia du Maurier Dame Daphne Evans Dame Edith Mary Fields Dame Gracie Fonteyn Dame Margot Genée Dame Adeline Hepworth Dame Jocelyn Barbara Lonsdale Dame Kathleen Markova Dame Alicia Marsh Dame Edith Ngaio Melba Dame Nellie Murdoch Dame Jean Iris Notre Dame University of Notre Dame de Paris Notre Dame school Rambert Dame Marie Schwarzkopf Dame Olga Maria Elisabeth Fredericke Smith Dame Maggie Smyth Dame Ethel Mary Sutherland Dame Joan Taylor Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Te Kanawa Dame Kiri Janette Tempest Dame Marie Thorndike Dame Agnes Sybil West Dame Rebecca Jeanne Françoise Julie Adélaïde dame de Récamier
Dame is a neutral point of territory, controlled by neither black nor white
The mistress of a family in common life, or the mistress of a common school; as, a dame's school
informal terms for a (young) woman a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady
an elderly woman
{i} madame, lady, ma'am
informal terms for a (young) woman
Dame Agatha Christie
born Sept. 15, 1890, Torquay, Devon, Eng. died Jan. 12, 1976, Wallingford, Oxfordshire British detective novelist and playwright. Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920), introduced Hercule Poirot, the eccentric Belgian detective who would appear in about 25 novels. The elderly spinster Miss Jane Marple, her other principal detective figure, first appeared in Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Most of her approximately 75 novels, such as Murder on the Orient Express (1933; film, 1978), were best-sellers; translated into 100 languages, they have sold more than 100 million copies. Her plays include The Mousetrap (1952), which set a world record for longest continuous run, and Witness for the Prosecution (1953; film, 1958). She was married to the eminent archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan (1904-78)
Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
born Sept. 15, 1890, Torquay, Devon, Eng. died Jan. 12, 1976, Wallingford, Oxfordshire British detective novelist and playwright. Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920), introduced Hercule Poirot, the eccentric Belgian detective who would appear in about 25 novels. The elderly spinster Miss Jane Marple, her other principal detective figure, first appeared in Murder at the Vicarage (1930). Most of her approximately 75 novels, such as Murder on the Orient Express (1933; film, 1978), were best-sellers; translated into 100 languages, they have sold more than 100 million copies. Her plays include The Mousetrap (1952), which set a world record for longest continuous run, and Witness for the Prosecution (1953; film, 1958). She was married to the eminent archaeologist Sir Max Mallowan (1904-78)
Dame Agnes Sybil Thorndike
born Oct. 24, 1882, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, Eng. died June 9, 1976, London British actress. As a member of the Old Vic company in London (1914-18), she became a leading tragic actress. Noted for her versatility in modern and classic plays, she originated the title role in George Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan (1924). She managed several London theatres, and she often costarred with her husband, the actor-director Lewis Casson, in her more than five decades in the theatre
Dame Alicia Markova
orig. Lilian Alicia Marks born Dec. 1, 1910, London, Eng. died Dec. 2, 2004, Bath British ballerina. She made her debut with Sergey Diaghilev's Ballets Russes in 1924 and became a leading ballerina noted for her ethereal lightness. At the Vic-Wells Ballet (1931-35; now the Royal Ballet) she became the first English dancer to dance the lead in Giselle. With her frequent partner Anton Dolin, she formed and directed several Markova-Dolin companies (1935-38) and the Festival Ballet (1950-52; now the English National Ballet). She continued to dance as a guest artist with many companies worldwide, admired for her interpretations of roles in Les Sylphides and Swan Lake, among others. She retired from the stage in 1963 and served as director of the Metropolitan Opera Ballet (1963-69)
Dame Barbara Cartland
a British writer who wrote hundreds of romantic novels in a rather old-fashioned style (1901-2000). born July 9, 1901, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Eng. died May 21, 2000, Hatfield, Hertfordshire English author. Her first novel, Jigsaw (1925), was a popular success. She wrote two more novels and a play during the 1920s; thereafter her output grew steadily, and by the 1970s she was averaging 23 books a year, all of which she dictated. Her approximately 600 books, mostly formulaic romance novels, have sold more than 600 million copies. Cartland's nonfiction includes autobiographies and books on health food, vitamins, and beauty. She was the step-grandmother of Diana, Princess of Wales
Dame Barbara Hepworth
born Jan. 10, 1903, Wakefield, Eng. died May 20, 1975, St. Ives British sculptor. Her work, naturalistic at first, became abstract by the 1930s, when she produced severe geometrical pieces with straight edges. As Hepworth's sculpture matured during the late 1930s and '40s, she concentrated on the problem of the counterplay between mass and space. By the 1950s she was internationally famous, and she received many prestigious commissions, including Single Form (1963), a memorial to Dag Hammarskjold at the UN Building, New York City. She became, with Henry Moore, a leader of the modern movement in England and one of the most influential sculptors of the mid 20th century
Dame Daphne du Maurier
born May 13, 1907, London, Eng. died April 19, 1989, Par, Cornwall British novelist and playwright. Granddaughter of George du Maurier and daughter of the actor-manager Sir Gerald Du Maurier (1873-1934), she is best known for the romantic gothic suspense novel Rebecca (1938), one of many successful tales set on the wild coast of Cornwall. Her other novels include Jamaica Inn (1936), Frenchman's Creek (1942), and My Cousin Rachel (1951). Her story "The Birds," like Jamaica Inn and Rebecca, was filmed by Alfred Hitchcock
Dame Edith Evans
born Feb. 8, 1888, London, Eng. died Oct. 14, 1976, Cranbrook, Kent British actress. She made her stage debut as Cressida in William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida (1912) and joined the Old Vic company in 1925. One of the finest actresses of the 20th century, she appeared in London and on Broadway in plays by Shakespeare, George Bernard Shaw, and Noë l Coward. She played Lady Bracknell in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest on stage and screen (1952). Her other films include Look Back in Anger (1959), Tom Jones (1963), The Chalk Garden (1964), and The Whisperers (1967)
Dame Edith Mary Evans
born Feb. 8, 1888, London, Eng. died Oct. 14, 1976, Cranbrook, Kent British actress. She made her stage debut as Cressida in William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida (1912) and joined the Old Vic company in 1925. One of the finest actresses of the 20th century, she appeared in London and on Broadway in plays by Shakespeare, George Bernard Shaw, and Noë l Coward. She played Lady Bracknell in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest on stage and screen (1952). Her other films include Look Back in Anger (1959), Tom Jones (1963), The Chalk Garden (1964), and The Whisperers (1967)
Dame Edith Ngaio Marsh
born April 23, 1895, Christchurch, N.Z. died Feb. 18, 1982, Christchurch New Zealand writer of detective stories. Originally an artist, she later acted in and produced Shakespearean repertory theatre (1938-64). She is known for her mystery stories featuring Inspector Roderick Alleyn of Scotland Yard. With novels such as Overture to Death (1939), Final Curtain (1947), Death of a Fool (1956), and Dead Water (1963), she helped make the detective story a respectable literary genre
Dame Edna
a humorous middle aged female character invented and performed by the male Australian comedian Barry Humphries. Her full name is 'Dame Edna Everage', and she wears unusual, brightly decorated clothes and glasses, and thinks that she is very attractive, amusing, and intelligent. Dame Edna
Dame Edna Everage
DAme Edna
Dame Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
born Dec. 9, 1915, Jarotschin, near Posen, Ger. German-born British soprano. After studies at the Berlin High School for Music, she debuted in 1938 as a flower maiden in the opera Parsifal. A 1942 recital in Berlin caused Karl Böhm to invite her to the Vienna State Opera. She made her Covent Garden debut in 1947 with that company and remained there for five years. Her voice bloomed, and she began her long associations with the Salzburg Festival (1949-64) and La Scala (1949-63). Her annual lieder recitals were legendary. Her opera farewell (1972) was in her famous role as the Marschallin in Der Rosenkavalier, and she retired in 1975
Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor
born Feb. 27, 1932, London, Eng. U.S. film actress. She left London for Los Angeles with her American parents at the outset of World War II. Noted for her exceptional beauty from childhood, she was discovered by a talent scout in Beverly Hills. She made her screen debut in 1942, appeared in Lassie Come Home in 1943, and became a star with National Velvet in 1944. She was a glamorous adult star in A Place in the Sun (1951), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), and Butterfield 8 (1960, Academy Award). In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1966, Academy Award) and other films, she starred opposite her husband, Richard Burton. After the mid-1970s, she appeared only intermittently in films, Broadway plays, and television films. Taylor's personal life (she was married eight times) was exceptionally well publicized and often tended to overshadow her acting career
Dame Elizabeth Taylor
born Feb. 27, 1932, London, Eng. U.S. film actress. She left London for Los Angeles with her American parents at the outset of World War II. Noted for her exceptional beauty from childhood, she was discovered by a talent scout in Beverly Hills. She made her screen debut in 1942, appeared in Lassie Come Home in 1943, and became a star with National Velvet in 1944. She was a glamorous adult star in A Place in the Sun (1951), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), and Butterfield 8 (1960, Academy Award). In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1966, Academy Award) and other films, she starred opposite her husband, Richard Burton. After the mid-1970s, she appeared only intermittently in films, Broadway plays, and television films. Taylor's personal life (she was married eight times) was exceptionally well publicized and often tended to overshadow her acting career
Dame Ethel Mary Smyth
born April 22, 1858, London, Eng. died May 9, 1944, Woking, Surrey British composer. Born into a military family, she studied at the Leipzig Conservatory and was encouraged by Johannes Brahms and Antonín Dvoák. She first gained notice with her sweeping Mass in D (1893). Her best-known work is The Wreckers (1906), the most admired English opera of its time. Her March of the Women (1911) reflected her strong involvement in the woman suffrage movement. Her comic opera The Boatswain's Mate (1916) enjoyed considerable success. Her work is notably eclectic, ranging from conventional to experimental. She wrote a multivolume autobiography, Impressions That Remained (1919-40)
Dame Ethel Smyth
born April 22, 1858, London, Eng. died May 9, 1944, Woking, Surrey British composer. Born into a military family, she studied at the Leipzig Conservatory and was encouraged by Johannes Brahms and Antonín Dvoák. She first gained notice with her sweeping Mass in D (1893). Her best-known work is The Wreckers (1906), the most admired English opera of its time. Her March of the Women (1911) reflected her strong involvement in the woman suffrage movement. Her comic opera The Boatswain's Mate (1916) enjoyed considerable success. Her work is notably eclectic, ranging from conventional to experimental. She wrote a multivolume autobiography, Impressions That Remained (1919-40)
Dame Gladys Cooper
born Dec. 18, 1888, Lewisham, London, Eng. died Nov. 17, 1971, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire British actress. After her London debut in 1906, she performed in musicals and dramas, including The Importance of Being Earnest (1911). She was comanager of London's Playhouse Theatre (1917-27) and then its sole manager (1927-33). Her appearance in The Second Mrs. Tanqueray (1922) made her a star. She made her U.S. stage debut in The Shining Hour (1934) and later acted in Relative Values (1951) and The Chalk Garden (1955). She personified British poise in U.S. films such as Now, Voyager (1942) and Separate Tables (1958)
Dame Gracie Fields
orig. Grace Stansfield born Jan. 9, 1898, Rochdale, Lancashire, Eng. died Sept. 27, 1979, Capri, Italy English music-hall comedienne. She performed in music halls from age 13 and gained notice in the touring revue Mr. Tower of London (1918-25). She became tremendously popular with an act composed of low-comedy songs such as "The Biggest Aspidistra in the World" and sentimental ballads such as "My Blue Heaven," performing on radio and television and in films such as Sally in Our Alley (1931) and Sing As We Go (1934)
Dame Iris Murdoch
a British writer born in Ireland. She wrote intelligent, humorous, and often complicated novels which include The Sea, The Sea and The Book and the Brotherhood. She also wrote books about philosophy (1919-99). born July 15, 1919, Dublin, Ire. died Feb. 8, 1999, Oxford, Oxfordshire, Eng. British novelist and philosopher. A graduate of the University of Oxford, she worked as a university lecturer while pursuing her writing career. Her first published work was a study of Jean-Paul Sartre (1953). Her novels, including The Bell (1958), A Severed Head (1961), The Black Prince (1973), The Sea, the Sea (1978), and The Book and the Brotherhood (1987), typically have convoluted plots featuring philosophical and comic elements. Her nonfiction philosophical works include The Sovereignty of Good (1970) and Metaphysics as a Guide to Morals (1992). Her decline under Alzheimer disease was chronicled by her husband, the critic John Bayley, in Elegy for Iris (1999)
Dame Ivy Compton-Burnett
born June 5, 1884, Pinner, Middlesex, Eng. died Aug. 27, 1969, London British novelist. She graduated from the University of London and published her first novel, Dolores, in 1911. Her second, Pastors and Masters (1925), introduced the style employing clipped, precise dialogue to reveal her characters and advance the plot that made her name. Her novels often dealt with struggles for power: Men and Wives (1931) featured a tyrannical mother, A House and Its Head (1935) a tyrannical father. She was created Dame of the British Empire in 1967
Dame Jean Iris Murdoch
born July 15, 1919, Dublin, Ire. died Feb. 8, 1999, Oxford, Oxfordshire, Eng. British novelist and philosopher. A graduate of the University of Oxford, she worked as a university lecturer while pursuing her writing career. Her first published work was a study of Jean-Paul Sartre (1953). Her novels, including The Bell (1958), A Severed Head (1961), The Black Prince (1973), The Sea, the Sea (1978), and The Book and the Brotherhood (1987), typically have convoluted plots featuring philosophical and comic elements. Her nonfiction philosophical works include The Sovereignty of Good (1970) and Metaphysics as a Guide to Morals (1992). Her decline under Alzheimer disease was chronicled by her husband, the critic John Bayley, in Elegy for Iris (1999)
Dame Joan Sutherland
of the 20th century. She is known as La Stupenda because of the great beauty of her singing, and she sang in opera houses all over the world from the 1950s to the 1980s (1926- ) an Australian opera singer, who is one of the most important sopranos (=women with high singing voices). born Nov. 7, 1926, Sydney, Austl. Australian soprano. After debuting in Sydney in 1947, she moved to London. Having sung minor roles at Covent Garden from 1952, she established her status as one of the leading coloraturas of the 20th century in a 1959 performance of Lucia di Lammermoor. She made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1961, and she became a favourite there and worldwide in bel canto roles until her retirement in 1991
Dame Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth
born Jan. 10, 1903, Wakefield, Eng. died May 20, 1975, St. Ives British sculptor. Her work, naturalistic at first, became abstract by the 1930s, when she produced severe geometrical pieces with straight edges. As Hepworth's sculpture matured during the late 1930s and '40s, she concentrated on the problem of the counterplay between mass and space. By the 1950s she was internationally famous, and she received many prestigious commissions, including Single Form (1963), a memorial to Dag Hammarskjold at the UN Building, New York City. She became, with Henry Moore, a leader of the modern movement in England and one of the most influential sculptors of the mid 20th century
Dame Judi Dench
born Dec. 9, 1934, York, Yorkshire, Eng. British actress. She made her stage debut in 1957 as Ophelia in Hamlet, and Shakespearean works became her specialty. She also performed in musical roles, starring in the London premiere of Cabaret in 1968. Among her many other notable credits were the 1981-84 TV series A Fine Romance and the films 84 Charing Cross Road (1986), Mrs. Brown (1997) in which she starred as Queen Victoria and Shakespeare in Love (1998, Academy Award)
Dame Judith Anderson
orig. Frances Margaret Anderson born Feb. 10, 1898, Adelaide, S.Aus., Australia died Jan. 3, 1992, Santa Barbara, Calif., U.S. Australian-born U.S. actress. She made her stage debut in Sydney in 1915 and first appeared in New York City in 1918. She was noted for roles such as Lavinia in Mourning Becomes Electra (1932), Gertrude in Hamlet (1936), Lady Macbeth in Macbeth (1937, 1941), and the title role in Medea (1947). She appeared in over 25 films, usually playing an evil or sinister figure, including Mrs. Danvers in Rebecca (1940) and Ann Treadwell in Laura (1944)
Dame Judith Olivia Dench
born Dec. 9, 1934, York, Yorkshire, Eng. British actress. She made her stage debut in 1957 as Ophelia in Hamlet, and Shakespearean works became her specialty. She also performed in musical roles, starring in the London premiere of Cabaret in 1968. Among her many other notable credits were the 1981-84 TV series A Fine Romance and the films 84 Charing Cross Road (1986), Mrs. Brown (1997) in which she starred as Queen Victoria and Shakespeare in Love (1998, Academy Award)
Dame Julie Andrews
orig. Julia Elizabeth Wells born Oct. 1, 1935, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, Eng. British-U.S. actress and singer. She made her London debut at 12 in a revue and her New York City stage debut in The Boy Friend (1954). A major star of the Broadway musical, she originated the roles of Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady (1956) and Guinevere in Camelot (1960). She also starred in films such as Mary Poppins (1964, Academy Award), and Victor/Victoria (1982), one of several films she made with her husband, director Blake Edwards. In 2000 she was made a Dame of the British Empire
Dame Kathleen Lonsdale
orig. Kathleen Yardley born Jan. 28, 1903, Newbridge, County Kildare, Ire. died April 1, 1971, London, Eng. Irish-born British crystallographer. In 1929 her X-ray crystallography techniques established the regular hexagonal arrangement of carbon atoms in molecules of benzene compounds. She developed a technique with which she measured (to seven figures) the distance between carbon atoms in diamond. She also applied crystallographic techniques to medical problems, in particular the study of bladder stones and certain drugs. In 1945 she became the first woman elected to the Royal Society of London, and in 1956 she was created Dame of the British Empire
Dame Kiri Janette Te Kanawa
born March 6, 1944, Gisborne, North Island, N.Z. New Zealand-born (half-Maori) soprano. After winning various singing competitions at home, she went to London for further study in 1966 and made her Covent Garden debut in 1970. Soon moving into leading roles, she became especially admired as the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro. In 1974 she made a triumphal debut at the Metropolitan Opera, substituting at the last moment in Giuseppe Verdi's Otello. A glamorous and regally imperturbable presence with a rich voice, she was chosen to sing at the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles, and she has made many recordings
Dame Kiri Te Kanawa
an opera singer from New Zealand. Many people admire her soprano voice (1944- ). born March 6, 1944, Gisborne, North Island, N.Z. New Zealand-born (half-Maori) soprano. After winning various singing competitions at home, she went to London for further study in 1966 and made her Covent Garden debut in 1970. Soon moving into leading roles, she became especially admired as the Countess in The Marriage of Figaro. In 1974 she made a triumphal debut at the Metropolitan Opera, substituting at the last moment in Giuseppe Verdi's Otello. A glamorous and regally imperturbable presence with a rich voice, she was chosen to sing at the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles, and she has made many recordings
Dame Maggie Smith
orig. Margaret Natalie Smith born Dec. 28, 1934, Ilford, Essex, Eng. British actress. She first gained recognition on Broadway in New Faces of 1956, and, after winning praise for her roles in The Rehearsal (1961) and Mary, Mary (1963), she joined Britain's National Theatre Company, where she starred opposite Laurence Olivier in Othello (1964; film, 1965). Her later films include The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969, Academy Award), Travels with My Aunt (1972), California Suite (1978, Academy Award), and The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987). Known for her nervous intensity, acid wit, and flawless timing, she has many great stage performances to her credit, notably in The Way of the World (1985) and Lettice and Lovage (1990, Tony Award)
Dame Margot Fonteyn
one of the UK's greatest ballet dancers, who worked with the Royal Ballet and often danced with Rudolf Nureyev (1919-91). orig. Margaret Hookham born May 18, 1919, Reigate, Surrey, Eng. died Feb. 21, 1991, Panama City, Pan. British ballerina. She debuted with the Vic-Wells Ballet (later Royal Ballet) in 1934 and soon became its leading dancer, creating many roles in works by Frederick Ashton, including Horoscope, Symphonic Variations, and Ondine. In the 1960s she won worldwide acclaim for her appearances with Rudolf Nureyev in ballets such as Swan Lake, Raymonda, and Le Corsaire. She continued to dance as a guest artist into the mid 1970s
Dame Marie Rambert
orig. Cyvia Rambam born Feb. 20, 1888, Warsaw, Pol., Russian Empire died June 12, 1982, London, Eng. Polish-born English ballet producer and director. She studied with the musician Émile Jaques-Dalcroze and taught his technique, eurythmics, to the Paris-based Ballets Russes, influencing Vaslav Nijinsky's avant-garde choreography. At the outbreak of World War I, she moved to London, where she studied ballet with Enrico Cecchetti (1850-1928); in 1920 she founded a ballet school that used his methods. In 1930 she helped found the Camargo Society and established the Ballet Club (later Ballet Rambert). As director of Ballet Rambert, she favoured experimentation, encouraging young choreographers such as Frederick Ashton and supporting new dancers and stage designers. Her troupe, renamed the Rambert Dance Company in 1987, has continued to perform
Dame Marie Tempest
orig. Marie Susan Etherington born July 15, 1864, London, Eng. died Oct. 15, 1942, London British actress. She began her career as an operetta singer, winning acclaim for her charming and high-spirited performances in Dorothy (1887) and touring the U.S. and Canada in the early 1890s in operettas such as The Bohemian Girl and The Pirates of Penzance. Turning to straight comedy in 1899, she appeared notably in English Nell (1900), Mrs. Dot (1908), and Hay Fever (1925)
Dame Mary Barbara Hamilton Cartland
born July 9, 1901, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Eng. died May 21, 2000, Hatfield, Hertfordshire English author. Her first novel, Jigsaw (1925), was a popular success. She wrote two more novels and a play during the 1920s; thereafter her output grew steadily, and by the 1970s she was averaging 23 books a year, all of which she dictated. Her approximately 600 books, mostly formulaic romance novels, have sold more than 600 million copies. Cartland's nonfiction includes autobiographies and books on health food, vitamins, and beauty. She was the step-grandmother of Diana, Princess of Wales
Dame Nellie Melba
orig. Helen Porter Mitchell born May 19, 1861, Richmond, near Melbourne, Austl. died Feb. 23, 1931, Sydney Australian soprano. After study with Mathilde Marchesi (1821-1913) in Paris, she debuted in Brussels in Rigoletto (1887), and in the next six years she sang in all the major opera houses of the world. One of the most celebrated coloraturas in the years preceding World War I, she sang mostly at Covent Garden after 1902. Concentrating on a few Italian and French operas, she possessed abundant technique and vocal beauty. Two foods, Melba toast and peach Melba, were named for her
Dame Ngaio Marsh
born April 23, 1895, Christchurch, N.Z. died Feb. 18, 1982, Christchurch New Zealand writer of detective stories. Originally an artist, she later acted in and produced Shakespearean repertory theatre (1938-64). She is known for her mystery stories featuring Inspector Roderick Alleyn of Scotland Yard. With novels such as Overture to Death (1939), Final Curtain (1947), Death of a Fool (1956), and Dead Water (1963), she helped make the detective story a respectable literary genre
Dame Ninette de Valois
orig. Edris Stannus born June 6, 1898, Blessington, Co. Wicklow, Ire. died March 8, 2001, London, Eng. Irish-born British dancer, choreographer, and founder of the precursor to the Royal Ballet. She appeared in revues and pantomimes from 1914 before joining the Ballets Russes as a soloist in 1923. She founded the Academy of Choreographic Art in 1926 to teach movement to actors and cofounded the Camargo Society in 1930. In 1931 she founded and directed the Vic-Wells Ballet; this became the Sadler's Wells Ballet (1946-56) and later the Royal Ballet (1956), which she directed until 1963. She choreographed many ballets in the 1930s and '40s and remained active with the company until 1971
Dame Olga Maria Elisabeth Fredericke Schwarzkopf
born Dec. 9, 1915, Jarotschin, near Posen, Ger. German-born British soprano. After studies at the Berlin High School for Music, she debuted in 1938 as a flower maiden in the opera Parsifal. A 1942 recital in Berlin caused Karl Böhm to invite her to the Vienna State Opera. She made her Covent Garden debut in 1947 with that company and remained there for five years. Her voice bloomed, and she began her long associations with the Salzburg Festival (1949-64) and La Scala (1949-63). Her annual lieder recitals were legendary. Her opera farewell (1972) was in her famous role as the Marschallin in Der Rosenkavalier, and she retired in 1975
Dame Peggy Ashcroft
a popular British actress who appeared in the theatre in many Shakespeare plays, and in films such as The Thirty-Nine Steps (1935) and A Passage to India (1984) (1907-91). orig. Edith Margaret Emily Ashcroft born Dec. 22, 1907, Croydon, London, Eng. died June 14, 1991, London British actress. She made her debut in 1927 and appeared from 1932 with the Old Vic company, winning acclaim in Romeo and Juliet (1935). She starred in more than 100 stage productions, playing comedy and tragedy with equal success. One of the great actresses of the British stage, she was a founding member of the Royal Shakespeare Co. (1961) and later a director. She acted in films such as The Thirty-nine Steps (1935) and A Passage to India (1984, Academy Award) and in the television series The Jewel in the Crown (1984)
Dame Rebecca West
orig. Cicily Isabel Fairfield born Dec. 21, 1892, London, Eng. died March 15, 1983, London British journalist, novelist, and critic. Trained as an actress, from 1911 West contributed to the left-wing press and made a name as a fighter for woman suffrage. She had a 10-year love affair (1913-23) with the novelist H.G. Wells. Her novels, including The Judge (1922), The Thinking Reed (1936), and The Birds Fall Down (1966), attracted less attention than her social and cultural writings. Her admired reports on the Nürnberg trials were collected in A Train of Powder (1955). Her history of Yugoslavia, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (1942), is regarded as one of the century's finest nonfiction works. In 1946 she reported on the trial for treason of William Joyce, articles that were later published as The Meaning of Treason (1949)
Dame Sybil Thorndike
born Oct. 24, 1882, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, Eng. died June 9, 1976, London British actress. As a member of the Old Vic company in London (1914-18), she became a leading tragic actress. Noted for her versatility in modern and classic plays, she originated the title role in George Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan (1924). She managed several London theatres, and she often costarred with her husband, the actor-director Lewis Casson, in her more than five decades in the theatre
dame nature
(French) mother nature
dame's rocket
A European plant (Hesperis matronalis) having clusters of fragrant purple to white flowers. Also called dame's violet
Hunchback of Notre Dame
a novel by Victor Hugo about a kind but ugly hunchback (=someone whose back has a large raised part on it) called Quasimodo, who rings bells in the cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris in the 15th century. He secretly loves a beautiful woman called Esmeralda, and when she is wrongly punished for being a murderer, he tries to save her (1831)
La Belle Dame Sans Merci
a famous poem by John Keats in which a knight meets a beautiful magical woman who says she loves him but then disappears
Notre Dame
famous cathedral in Paris; Catholic university located in Indiana (USA); Virgin Mary, Jesus' mother
Notre Dame
a famous cathedral (=a large important church) in central Paris, which is a beautiful Gothic building from the 12th century, and a popular place for tourists to visit
Notre-Dame de Paris
(1163- 1350) Gothic cathedral on the Île de la Cité in Paris. Probably the most famous Gothic cathedral, Notre-Dame is a superb example of the Rayonnant style. Two massive Early Gothic towers (1210-50) crown the western facade, which is divided into three stories and has doors adorned with Early Gothic carvings and surmounted by a row of figures of Old Testament kings. The single-arch flying buttresses at the eastern end are notable for their boldness and grace. Its three great rose windows, which retain their 13th-century glass, are of awe-inspiring beauty
Notre-Dame school
Composers of organum at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris in the late 12th and early 13th centuries. Léonin ( 1135-1201?) is credited with composing two-voice florid organum characterized by a rhythmically patterned "melisma" (a series of notes sung on one syllable) added to each sustained note of the plainchant (see Gregorian chant). He may have devised the rhythmic notation (ligatures) that made this possible or at least codified the important system of rhythmic modes. His younger contemporary Pérotin (fl. 1200) is said to have edited, extended, and added parts to Léonin's Magnus liber organi ("Great Book of Organum") and created the first three-and four-voice textures known in world music. See also Ars Antiqua
Te Arikinui Dame Te Atairangikaahu
{i} Te Atairangi Kaahu (1931-2006), Maori Queen of New Zealand, 6th holder of the Maori kingship who was elected in 1966
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Victor Hugo's nineteenth century novel which was also adapted into several popular movies
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame a private Catholic university in Indiana, US, which is famous especially for having a very good football team. Private university in Notre Dame, near South Bend, Indiana, U.S. It was founded in 1842 and reorganized in the 1920s; it became coeducational in 1972. It is affiliated with the Roman Catholic church. It has colleges of arts and letters, science, engineering, and business administration. It also has a graduate school and a law school
dames
plural of dame
grande dame
a woman of great prestige or ability
grande dame
mistress, lady, madam
dame

    Heceleme

    Dame

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    deym

    Telaffuz

    /ˈdām/ /ˈdeɪm/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'dAm ] (noun.) 13th century. Via Middle English and Old French from Latin domina

    Günün kelimesi

    parsimonious