dag

listen to the pronunciation of dag
İngilizce - Türkçe
(Argo) salak
dagger
{i} hançer

Tom Mary'yi bir hançerle bıçakladı.. - Tom stabbed Mary with a dagger.

O hançeri bu şekilde tutmalısın. - You must grip that dagger this way.

dagger
işaret/hançer
dagger
{i} kama
dagger
Iook daggers at someone bir kimseye öfke ile bakmak
dagger
cembiye
Türkçe - Türkçe
(Osmanlı Dönemi) İnsan veya hayvan vücuduna kızgın demirle vurulan damga
(Osmanlı Dönemi) f. Yanık yarası
iskandinav mitolojisinde günün kişileştirilmesi
DAGS
(Osmanlı Dönemi) (C.: Adgas) Rüyâ karışıklığı
DAGS
(Osmanlı Dönemi) Karışık olmak
İngilizce - İngilizce
Directed Acyclic Graph in computer science and mathematics
Defense Acquisition Guide in United States law
Deputy Attorney General in several nations’ federal governments
diacylglycerol in biochemistry
A hanging end or shred, in particular a long pointed strip of cloth at the edge of a piece of clothing, or one of a row of decorative strips of cloth that may ornament a tent, booth or fairground
A dangling lock of sheep’s wool matted with dung

note that free pellets are characteristic of healthy sheep and that if sheep consistently produced free pellets, wool staining and dag formation would not occur.

A skewer
A spit, a sharpened rod used for roasting food over a fire
Expressing shock, awe or surprise; used as a general intensifier
One who dresses unfashionably. May be used as form of endearment emphasizing that they are different, outsiders

A graduate of film studies in New York, May has had a hand in editing two of his three videos. Each casts him as a bespectacled dag in a world of glamour.

A directed acyclic graph; an ordered pair (V, E) such that E is a subset of some partial ordering relation on V
To shear the hindquarters of a sheep in order to remove dags or prevent their formation

After learning how to crutch at 13, he could dag 400 sheep in a day by the spring of 1965 and earned himself more than just a bit of pocket money.

To cut or slash the edge of a garment into dags
To skewer food, for roasting over a fire
{v} t. to daggle, dirty daub, trim
{n} a kind of sort sword
Acronym for "Data Acquisition Geek," a computer expert who maintains a team's Data Acquisition system and analyzes the data
a flap along the edge of a garment; used in medieval clothing
A dangling lock of sheep's wool matted with dung
Directed Acyclic Graph
A triangular shaped decorative attachment, usually along the hem lines of a piece of mail clothing Forms a "wavy" edge
One of a row of decorative strips of cloth, ornamenting a tent, booth, or fairground
(day) Son of Natt or night (Scandinavian mythology )
To daggle or bemire
To cut into jags or points; to slash; as, to dag a garment
Research Group at the University of Waikato, concerned with hardware monitoring solutions Consult [DAG99] for an explanation of the acronym
A sharpened stick, used for roasting food over a fire. Compare dogwood, formerly dagwood
{i} scalloped edge on fabric
Directed acyclic graph A scene graph
An uncool person commonly not a dork, loser, nerd. May be used as form of endearment emphasising that they are different
A long pointed strip of cloth at the edge of a piece of clothing
division artillery group
10 grams
The unbranched antler of a young deer
Directed acyclic graph Graphs are representations with nodes and arcs (or links) DAGs are often drawn in terms of circles and arrows where the circles represent nodes and the arrows represent arcs The term "directed" means that each link has a direction, suggested pictorially by the arrowhead from one node to another Acyclic means that there are no loops in the graph, that is, a path of arcs that start at one node and find their way back again
means Deputy Attorney General
A loose end; a dangling shred
Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) refers to a way of arranging objects based on their relationships and allows a child to have multiple parents
A large pistol formerly used
To be misty; to drizzle
decagram
Abbreviation for Directed Acyclic Graph This is a technical term for a hierarchy where none of the children can themselves be their own parents If you walked from the first node in the hierarchy to the very last you would never see the same node twice
A dagger; a poniard
division artillery group sect -section
A misty shower; dew
Dag Hammarskjold
{i} (1905-1961) Swedish economist and diplomat, Secretary-General of the United Nations (1953-1961), awarded the 1961 Nobel Peace Prize posthumously
Dag Hammarskjöld
born July 29, 1905, Jönköping, Swed. died Sept. 18, 1961, near Ndola, Northern Rhodesia Second secretary-general of the UN (1953-61). His father was prime minister of Sweden and chairman of the Nobel Prize Foundation. Hammarskjöld studied law and economics in Uppsala and Stockholm, then taught at Stockholm (1933-36). He served in the finance ministry, as president of the board of the Bank of Sweden, and in the foreign ministry, where he became chair of the Swedish delegation to the UN (1952). He was appointed secretary-general in 1953 and was reappointed in 1957. His first three years were quiet, but he subsequently dealt with the Suez Crisis, conflict in Lebanon and Jordan, and civil strife following the creation of the Republic of the Congo (1960). He died in a plane crash on a peace mission to Africa. He was posthumously awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1961. As secretary-general, Hammarskjöld is generally thought to have combined great moral force with subtlety in meeting international challenges
Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld
born July 29, 1905, Jönköping, Swed. died Sept. 18, 1961, near Ndola, Northern Rhodesia Second secretary-general of the UN (1953-61). His father was prime minister of Sweden and chairman of the Nobel Prize Foundation. Hammarskjöld studied law and economics in Uppsala and Stockholm, then taught at Stockholm (1933-36). He served in the finance ministry, as president of the board of the Bank of Sweden, and in the foreign ministry, where he became chair of the Swedish delegation to the UN (1952). He was appointed secretary-general in 1953 and was reappointed in 1957. His first three years were quiet, but he subsequently dealt with the Suez Crisis, conflict in Lebanon and Jordan, and civil strife following the creation of the Republic of the Congo (1960). He died in a plane crash on a peace mission to Africa. He was posthumously awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1961. As secretary-general, Hammarskjöld is generally thought to have combined great moral force with subtlety in meeting international challenges
dagger
A text character (†) that is used for footnotes, to signify death, and to express the mathematical application of Hermitian conjugacy
dagger
A stabbing weapon, similar to a sword but with a short, double-edged blade

The dagger, under the title cultellum and misericorde, has been the constant companion of the sword, at least from the days of Edward I. and is mentioned in the statute of Winchester.

dagger
{n} a kind of sort sword
dagger
A short stabbing weapon with pointed and edged blade Also, the name of a US canoe and kayak manufacturer
dagger
A knife with a long blade (10'-15") primarily for parrying , used in concert with the rapier of the 16th-17th centuries
dagger
{i} dirk
dagger
It is the second in order when more than one reference occurs on a page; called also obelisk
dagger
(see Athame)
dagger
a character used for the second order of reference in footnotes, etc (the * being the first order) Luckombe (1771) was adamant that this sign was to be called an obelisk, or long cross, and not a dagger It was originally used in setting religious services, etc, especially when the normal cross was not available in the type fount Also Croix or Kreuz Displayed as ¦ in the layouts, but is † for DOS users Similarly, the third order reference sign is the double dagger ‡, which is displayed in the layouts as ¦¦
dagger
a/ A short strong knife with both a cut and thrust blade b/ A defensive weapon used in the left hand with the rapier in the right Also know as the main-gauche
dagger
A short weapon used for stabbing
dagger
A timber placed diagonally in a ship's frame
dagger
A magical implement, used in ritual, attributed to the element of Air
dagger
To pierce with a dagger; to stab
dagger
A sophisticated disguise first used in the Soviet Union in the 1970s
dagger
Poniard, Stiletto, Bowie knife, Dirk, Misericorde, Anlace
dagger
This is the general term: cf
dagger
† is a dagger ‡ is a double dagger Daggers are commonly used as footnote reference marks
dagger
a short knife with a pointed blade used for piercing or stabbing
dagger
A text character (†) that is used for footnotes, to signify death, and to express the mathematical application of Hermitian conjugacy
dagger
A dagger is a weapon like a knife with two sharp edges
dagger
a character used in printing to indicate a cross reference or footnote
dagger
{i} small knife; cross shaped sign (used in printing)
dagger
If you say that two people are at daggers drawn, you mean they are having an argument and are still very angry with each other. She and her mother were at daggers drawn
dagger
Second of the reference marks, following the asterisk Also known as the obelisk
dagger
a short knife with a pointed blade used for piercing or stabbing a character used in printing to indicate a cross reference or footnote
dagger
A mark of reference in the form of a dagger [†]
Türkçe - İngilizce
dwi
dag