confessor

listen to the pronunciation of confessor
İngilizce - İngilizce
A priest who hears confession and then gives absolution
One who confesses to having done something wrong
One who confesses faith in Christianity who is not martyred, especially in the face of persecution
a spiritual advisor
{n} one who hears confession, a martyr
a priest who hears confession and gives absolution someone who confesses (discloses information damaging to themselves)
One who confesses; one who acknowledges a fault, or the truth of a charge, at the risk of suffering; specifically, one who confesses himself a follower of Christ and endures persecution for his faith
V Pneumatikos (see confession) 2) A person who defended and publicly confessed the Faith, thereby exposing himself to persecution (Homologetis)
1 A person who has been declared a saint because of the way he/she lived rather than because of martyrdom 2 A priest hearing sacramental confession
If you describe someone as your confessor, you mean that they are the person you can talk to about your secrets or problems. He was their adviser, confidant and father confessor. the priest who someone regularly makes their confession to
someone who confesses (discloses information damaging to themselves)
One who confesses his faith in Christianity, especially in the face of persecution
1) Pneumatikos (see confession) 2) A person who defended and publicly confessed the Faith, thereby exposing himself to persecution (Homologetis)
{i} one who confesses, one who admits; priest who hears confession; one who confesses faith in Christianity (especially in the face of persecution)
A priest who hears the confessions of others and is authorized to grant them absolution
a priest who hears confession and gives absolution
A confessor is a priest who hears a person's confession
Saint Edward the Confessor
born 1003, Islip, Eng. died Jan. 5, 1066, London; canonized 1161; feast day originally January 5, now October 13 King of England (1042-66). The son of Ethelred II, he was exiled to Normandy for 25 years (1016-41) while the Danes held England (see Canute the Great). For the first 11 years of his reign, the real master of England was Godwine, earl of Wessex. Edward outlawed Godwine in 1051 and appointed Normans to high positions in government, thus preparing the way for the Norman Conquest. Godwine continued his opposition, and his son Harold (see Harold II) dominated England after 1053, subjugating Wales in 1063. Edward named Harold as his successor on his deathbed, but the duke of Normandy (the future William I) invaded England to claim the crown earlier promised him. Though an ineffectual monarch, Edward was famous for his piety, which earned him the epithet "the Confessor
edward the confessor
son of Ethelred the Unready; King of England from 1042 to 1066; he founded Westminster Abbey where he was eventually buried (1003-1066)
father confessor
priest authorized to hear confessions; spiritual father
confessor