coke

listen to the pronunciation of coke
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} kola

Kolayı kahveye tercih ederim. - I prefer coke to coffee.

Git ve üç şişe kola al. - Go and buy three bottles of coke.

{i} kok

Kömür, mangal kömürü, kok kömürü ve petrol koku yakıt olarak kullanılmaktadır. - Coal, charcoal, coal coke and petroleum coke are used as fuels.

{i} kokain
dönüştürmek
{i} kok kömürü

Kömür, mangal kömürü, kok kömürü ve petrol koku yakıt olarak kullanılmaktadır. - Coal, charcoal, coal coke and petroleum coke are used as fuels.

{i} argo kokain
koka kola
{i} kolalı içecek
{i} k.dili. kolalı içecek
maden kömürünü kok kömürüne çevirmek
dili kola cinsi içecekler
kokain/kola/kok kömür
ısıt
cennet tozu
gazhane koku/kömürü
coke breeze
kok tozu
coke breeze
kok mıcırı
coke crushing plant
kok kırma tesisi
coke furnace
kok fırını
coke oven
kok fırını
coke oven plant
kok fabrikası
coke oven tar
kok fırını katranı
coke quenching tower
kok söndürme kulesi
coke analysis
kok kömürü anali
coke breeze
kok gazı
coke firing
kok kömürü yakma
coke kiln
kok fırını
coke oven gas
kok fırını gazı
coke oven plant
(Madencilik) kok üretimliği
coke pig
kok piki
coke production
kok kömürü üretimi
coke ram
(Endüstri) ocak boşaltıcı
cocaine
kokain

O, kokaine bağımlıdır. - He is addicted to cocaine.

Polis köpeği onun çantasındaki kokainin izini buldu. - The police dog found trace amounts of cocaine in his luggage.

casting coke
(Madencilik) Döküm koku
coking
koklaştırma
pet coke
pet kola
petroleum coke
petrol koku
blast furnace coke
metalurjik kok
blast furnace coke
yüksek fırın koku
broken coke
kırma kok
broken coke
kırılmış kok
cocaine
kokain iptilâsı
cocaine
kokain kullanma alışkanlığı
cocaine
kokain cocainism
cocaine
(isim) kokain
cocaine
(Tıp) Çeşitli Erythroxylon türleri yapraklarından elde edilen bir alkaloid (C17H21NO4)
crushed coke
kok mıcırı
foundry coke
(Madencilik) döküm koku
gas coke
havagazı kömürü atığı
lignite coke
linyit koku
petroleum coke
(Madencilik) yeryağı koku
İngilizce - İngilizce
A cola-based soft drink containing caffeine and sugar

I'd like a Coke.

any cola-flavored drink, especially Coca-Cola
cocaine
A type of the coal-derived steel-making material and fuel
Solid residue from roasting coal in a coke oven; used principally as a fuel and in the production of steel. Formally used also as a domestic fuel in Appalachian coal-mining areas
any soft drink
{i} ® Coca Cola, brand name of a popular carbonated soft drink which was first invented in 1886 in Atlanta (Georgia, USA) by a pharmacist named Dr. John Stith Pemberton (originally intended as a patent medicine)
Basic fuel consumed in blast furnaces in the smelting of iron Coke is a processed form of coking coal Inside the narrow confines of the coke oven, coal is heated in absence of t oxygen to drive off gases and impurities
Hydrocarbon heated to remove volatiles to get pure carbon
{i} cocaine (addictive drug); carbon fuel obtained by distillation of coal; anthracite; Coca-Cola (sweet carbonated drink)
In general, coke is made from bituminous coal from which the volatile constituents are driven off by baking in an oven at temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, so that the fixed carbon and ash are fused together Coke is hard and porous and is strong enough to support a load of iron ore in a blast furnace It is used both as a fuel and a reducing agent in smelting iron ore in a blast furnace
The solid black hydrocarbon left as a residue after the volatile hydrocarbons have been removed from bitumen by distillation
In catalysis, refers to a carbon-rich deposit that can form on the surface, often blocking access to active sites
A hard, dry carbon substance produced by heating coal to a very high temperature(1000 degrees celsius) in the absence of air Coke is used in the manufacture of iron and steel
A high carbon content solid residue from an oil refinery process, which can be used as a boiler fuel to produce steam and electric power
Fuel used in a cupola to melt charge materials Source of some carbon found in iron
A solid carbonaceous residue derived from low-ash, low-sulfur bituminous coal from which the volatile constituents are driven off by baking in an oven at temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit so that the fixed carbon and residual ash are fused together Coke is used as a fuel and as a reducing agent in smelting iron ore in a blast furnace Coke from coal is grey, hard, and porous and has a heating value of 24 8 million Btu per short ton
A hard, dry carbon substance produced by heating coal to a very high temperature in the absence of air Coke is used in the manufacture of iron and steel
– A hard, dry carbon substance produced by heating coal to a very high temperature in the absence of air
It is lagerly used where &?; smokeless fire is required
A solid-fuel product containing about 80 per cent of carbon produced by distillation of coal to drive off its volatile constitutents
To convert into coke
carbon fuel produced by distillation of coal
street names for cocaine
The basic fuel consumed in blast furnaces in the smelting of iron Coke is a processed form of coal About 1,000 pounds of coke are needed to process a ton of pig iron, an amount which represents more than 50% of an integrated steel mill's total energy use Metallurgical coal burns sporadically and reduces into a sticky mass Processed coke, however, burns steadily inside and out and is not crushed by the weight of the iron ore in the blast furnace Inside the narrow confines of the coke oven, coal is heated without oxygen for 18 hours to drive off gases and impurities
Coke is a solid black substance that is produced from coal and is burned as a fuel. a coke-burning stove
Solid residue from coal used as a fuel and in the production of steel
Coke is the same as cocaine. A trademark used for a soft drink. See Regional Note at tonic. To convert or be converted into coke. To affect or intoxicate with cocaine. Solid residue remaining after certain types of coals are heated to a high temperature out of contact with air until substantially all components that easily vaporize have been driven off. The residue is chiefly carbon, with minor amounts of hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen. Also present in coke is the mineral matter in the original coal, chemically altered and decomposed. The gradual exhaustion of timber in England had led first to prohibitions on cutting of wood for charcoal and eventually to the introduction of coke. Thereafter the iron industry expanded rapidly and Britain became the world's greatest iron producer (see Abraham Darby). The crucible process (1740) resulted in the first reliable steel made by a melting process. Oven coke (about 1.5-4 in., or 40-100 mm, in size) is used in blast furnaces to make iron. Smaller quantities of coke are used in other metallurgical processes (see metallurgy), such as the manufacture of certain alloys. Large, strong coke, known as foundry coke, is used in smelting. Smaller sizes of coke (0.6-1.2 in., or 15-30 mm) are used to heat buildings
A porous solid composed mainly of carbon and ash
Carbonizing coal made in oven by driving off volatile elements It is a hard porous substance that is principally pure carbon In blast furnaces, coke helps generate the 3000 F temperatures and reducing gases needs to smelt iron ore
coal that has had most of the gases removed through heating
become coke; "petroleum oils coke after distillation"
clean, light fuel produced when coal is strongly heated in an air- tight oven Coke contains 90% carbon and makes an useful domestic and industrial fuel (used, for example in the iron and steel industries and in the production of town gas)
Coca Cola is a trademarked cola
Cocaine; Coca leaves
Coke is a solid carbon fuel and carbon source used to melt and reduce iron ore
Mineral coal charred, or depriver of its bitumen, sulphur, or other volatile matter by roasting in a kiln or oven, or by distillation, as in gas works
Coal from which most gases have been removed by heating It burns with intense heat and little smoke, and is used as an industrial fuel A solid residue left after the distillation of petroleum or other liquid hydrocarbons
street names for cocaine carbon fuel produced by distillation of coal become coke; "petroleum oils coke after distillation
Hard carbon and other crude oil impurities that can form inside furnace tubes
any type of caramel-colored soft drink, especially Coca Cola
Coke is the residue formed when coal is heated in the absence of air It is primarily carbon with mineral matter and some residual volatile material (1)
coke bottle
A type of styling characterized by wide ends and a narrow mid-section
coke bottle
Having thick glass, said particularly of spectacle lenses

Coke-bottle glasses.

coke-bottle
Alternative spelling of coke bottle
petroleum coke
a substance, mostly carbon, that is a byproduct of oil refining; used as a fuel or in many industrial applications
Cokes
plural of Coke
Sir Edward Coke
born Feb. 1, 1552, Mileham, Norfolk, Eng. died Sept. 3, 1634, Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire British jurist and politician. He became a lawyer in 1578 and was made solicitor general in 1592. His advance to the position of attorney general (1594) frustrated his great rival, Francis Bacon. As attorney general, he conducted several famous treason trials, prosecuting Robert Devereux, 2nd earl of Essex, and Henry Wriothesley, 3rd earl of Southampton (1600-01); Sir Walter Raleigh (1603); and the Gunpowder Plot conspirators (1605). Named chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas in 1606, Coke earned the ire of James I by declaring that the king's proclamation could not change the law (1610). He upset church leaders by limiting the jurisdiction of ecclesiastical courts. Appointed chief justice of the King's Bench by James I (1613), he remained unswayed; he hinted at scandal in high places and defied a royal injunction in a case involving ecclesiastical privileges. He was dismissed in 1616, partly through Bacon's efforts. In 1620 he reentered Parliament (he had served in 1589), where he denounced interference with Parliament's liberties (1621) until he was imprisoned. In 1628 he helped frame the Petition of Right, a charter of liberties; this defense of the supremacy of the common law over royal prerogative had a profound influence on the English law and constitution. On his death his papers were seized by Charles I. His Reports (1600-15), taken together, are a monumental compendium of English common law, and his Institutes of the Lawes of England (4 vol., 1628-44) is an important treatise
coked
Intoxicated with cocaine
cokes
A simpleton; a gull; a dupe
coking
(a) The undesirable accumulation of carbon (coke) deposits in the internal combustion engine or in a refinery plant (b) The process of distilling a petroleum product to dryness
coking
{i} process that produces coke which is carbon fuel produced by distillation of coal (Technology)
coking
Processes for thermally converting and upgrading heavy residual oil into lighter products and by-product petroleum coke
coking
The undesirable accumulation of carbon (coke) deposits in the internal combustion engine or in a refinery plant The process of distilling a petroleum product to dryness
coking
{s} pertaining to coke
coking
The manufacture of coke via the destructive distillation of coal
coke

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    kōk

    Telaffuz

    /ˈkōk/ /ˈkoʊk/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'kOk ] (noun.) 1669. Abbreviated form of Coca-Cola.

    Zamanlar

    cokes, coking, coked

    Videolar

    ... they tried to sell at a large coke and from the start I think our actual ...

    Günün kelimesi

    accrete