clarence

listen to the pronunciation of clarence
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A ducal title which has been traditionally awarded to junior members of the English and British royal families
A male given name
A placename given to towns in countries settled by the British
An English surname
A kind of carriage popular in the 19th century; a four-wheeled horse-driven vehicle with a glass front and room for four passengers
Birdseye Clarence Darrow Clarence Seward William Clarence Eckstein Lewis Clarence Irving Lowry Clarence Malcolm McClung Clarence Erwin Thomas Clarence
{i} male first name; female first name; family name; city in Missouri (USA); city in Iowa (USA); village in Louisiana (USA); river in southeastern Australia; river in New Zealand
An English given name
a closed carriage with four wheels and seats for four passengers
A close four-wheeled carriage, with one seat inside, and a seat for the driver
{i} four seater carriage (named after the Duke of Clarence)
Clarence House
the office of Prince Charles

Clarence House has issued a joint statement with the Ministry of Defence confirming that Prince Harry will be deployed to Iraq later this year.

Clarence House
a royal home in London, now the official residence of Prince Charles
Clarence Birdseye
born Dec. 9, 1886, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 7, 1956, New York U.S. businessman and inventor. He developed a highly efficient process for freezing foods in small packages suitable for retailing. He achieved rapid freezing by placing packaged food, including fish, fruits, and vegetables, between two refrigerated metal plates. Though his were not the first frozen foods, his process largely preserved the original taste of the food. In 1929 his company was bought by Postum, Inc., which later became General Foods Corp. Birdseye served as a corporate executive until 1938
Clarence Birdseye
{i} (1886-1956) U.S. inventor who invented a spotlight with a reflector back, founder of the frozen food industry
Clarence Darrow
(1857-1938) American lawyer and defender of civil liberties, defense attorney in the famous "Scopes Monkey" trial and the trial of William D. Haywood
Clarence Darrow
a US lawyer known for representing workers and members of trade unions in court cases. In his most famous case, the Scopes Trial, he defended a teacher who was taken to court for teaching his students about evolution and the ideas of Charles Darwin (1857-1938). born April 18, 1857, near Kinsman, Ohio, U.S. died March 13, 1938, Chicago, Ill. U.S. lawyer and orator. He attended law school for only one year before being admitted to the Ohio bar in 1878. Darrow moved to Chicago in 1887 and immediately joined the effort to free anarchists charged with murder in the Haymarket Riot. He was appointed Chicago city corporation counsel (1890) and then became general attorney for the Chicago and North Western Railway. His defense of Eugene V. Debs on charges stemming from the Pullman Strike (1894) established Darrow's reputation as a union and criminal lawyer. He represented striking Pennsylvania coal miners, drawing attention to working conditions and the use of child labour (1902-03); secured the acquittal of William Haywood in the assassination of Gov. Frank R. Steunenberg of Idaho (1907); and sought to defend the McNamara brothers, accused of bombing the Los Angeles Times building (1911). He saved Richard Loeb and Nathan Leopold from a death sentence for the murder of 14-year-old Robert Franks and won acquittal for members of an African American family who had fought a mob trying to expel them from their home in a white Detroit neighbourhood (1925-26). Perhaps his most famous case was the Scopes trial (1925), in which he defended a high school teacher who was charged with violating a Tennessee state law against teaching Darwin's theory of evolution
Clarence E McClung
born April 6, 1870, Clayton, Calif., U.S. died Jan. 17, 1946, Swarthmore, Pa. U.S. zoologist. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. His study of the mechanisms of heredity led to his hypothesis (1901) that an extra, or accessory, chromosome determined sex. The discovery of the sex-determining chromosome provided some of the earliest evidence that a given chromosome carries a definable set of hereditary traits. McClung also studied how the behaviour of chromosomes in the sex cells of different organisms affects their heredity
Clarence Erwin McClung
born April 6, 1870, Clayton, Calif., U.S. died Jan. 17, 1946, Swarthmore, Pa. U.S. zoologist. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. His study of the mechanisms of heredity led to his hypothesis (1901) that an extra, or accessory, chromosome determined sex. The discovery of the sex-determining chromosome provided some of the earliest evidence that a given chromosome carries a definable set of hereditary traits. McClung also studied how the behaviour of chromosomes in the sex cells of different organisms affects their heredity
Clarence House
royal residence of the Queen Mother (England)
Clarence Irving Lewis
born April 12, 1883, Stoneham, Mass., U.S. died Feb. 3, 1964, Cambridge, Mass. U.S. philosopher. He taught primarily at Harvard University (1920-53). His best-known works are Mind and the World Order (1929), Symbolic Logic (1932), An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation (1947), and The Ground and Nature of the Right (1955). He maintained that knowledge is possible only where there is also a possibility of error. His position in epistemology represents a synthesis of empiricism and pragmatism
Clarence Malcolm Lowry
born July 28, 1909, Birkhead, Cheshire, Eng. died June 27, 1957, Ripe, Sussex British novelist, short-story writer, and poet. In his youth Lowry rebelled against his conventional upbringing and shipped to China as a cabin boy; he later lived in France, the U.S., Mexico, Canada, and Italy. His reputation rests on the novel Under the Volcano (1947), about the last desperate day of a dispirited alcoholic and former British consul in Mexico. Its juxtaposition of images of social decay and self-destructiveness was seen as a symbolic vision of Europe on the verge of World War II. Though critically praised, it received popular recognition only after Lowry's death at age 47, probably the result of alcoholism
Clarence Melvin Zener
{i} (1905-1993) USA physicist, namesake of the zener diode
Clarence Seward Darrow
born April 18, 1857, near Kinsman, Ohio, U.S. died March 13, 1938, Chicago, Ill. U.S. lawyer and orator. He attended law school for only one year before being admitted to the Ohio bar in 1878. Darrow moved to Chicago in 1887 and immediately joined the effort to free anarchists charged with murder in the Haymarket Riot. He was appointed Chicago city corporation counsel (1890) and then became general attorney for the Chicago and North Western Railway. His defense of Eugene V. Debs on charges stemming from the Pullman Strike (1894) established Darrow's reputation as a union and criminal lawyer. He represented striking Pennsylvania coal miners, drawing attention to working conditions and the use of child labour (1902-03); secured the acquittal of William Haywood in the assassination of Gov. Frank R. Steunenberg of Idaho (1907); and sought to defend the McNamara brothers, accused of bombing the Los Angeles Times building (1911). He saved Richard Loeb and Nathan Leopold from a death sentence for the murder of 14-year-old Robert Franks and won acquittal for members of an African American family who had fought a mob trying to expel them from their home in a white Detroit neighbourhood (1925-26). Perhaps his most famous case was the Scopes trial (1925), in which he defended a high school teacher who was charged with violating a Tennessee state law against teaching Darwin's theory of evolution
Clarence Thomas
born June 23, 1948, Pinpoint, near Savannah, Ga., U.S. U.S. jurist. He graduated from Yale Law School and served as assistant attorney general in Missouri (1974-77), lawyer for Monsanto Co. (1977-79), legislative assistant to Sen. John Danforth (1979-81), assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Education (1981-82), and chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) (1982-90). Pres. George Bush appointed him to the U.S. Court of Appeals in 1990 and then to the Supreme Court of the United States; he thereby became the second African American justice on the court, after Thurgood Marshall. His 1991 confirmation hearings attracted enormous public interest and media attention, largely because of accusations of sexual harassment by Anita Hill, a law professor and former colleague of Thomas at the EEOC. Thomas denied the charges, and the Senate narrowly voted to confirm him. A quiet presence on the court, he generally follows a predictable pattern in his opinions conservative, restrained, and suspicious of the reach of the federal government into the realm of state and local politics
clarence

    Heceleme

    Clar·ence

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    klerıns

    Telaffuz

    /ˈklerəns/ /ˈklɛrəns/

    Etimoloji

    () Named after Prince William, Duke of Clarence and St Andrews, later to become William IV of the United Kingdom.

    Videolar

    ... I actually had Clarence Clemons from the A Street Band ...

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