chinook

listen to the pronunciation of chinook
İngilizce - Türkçe
şinuk
(Meteoroloji) çinok
İngilizce - İngilizce
A Native American language of the Penutian family of Oregon and Washington
The name given to the descending, warm, dry wind on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains. The chinook generally blows from the southwest, but its direction may be modified by topography. When it sets in after a spell of intense cold, the temperature may rise by 20°F to 40°F in 15 minutes due to replacement of a cold air mass with a much warmer air mass in minutes
{i} member of the Chinook Indian tribe
Northwest Coast Indian people of Washington and Oregon, U.S. At the time of first contact, the Chinook who were in fact composed of several smaller groups, including the Lower Chinook, the Clatsop, the Clackamas, and the Wasco lived along the lower Columbia River and spoke Chinookan languages. They were famous as traders, with connections stretching as far as the Great Plains. They traded dried salmon, canoes, shells, and slaves. Chinook Jargon, the trade language of the Northwest Coast, was a combination of Chinook with Nootka and other Indian, English, and French terms. The Chinook were first described by the explorers Lewis and Clark, who encountered them in 1805. The basic social unit was the clan. Chinook religion focused on salmon rites and guardian spirits, and the potlatch was an important social ceremony. Following a smallpox epidemic in the early 19th century that brought about the collapse of Chinook culture, most of the remaining Chinook were absorbed into other Northwest Coast groups and many were removed to reservations. Only some 600 individuals claimed sole Chinook descent in the 2000 U.S. census. In 2001 the Chinook gained federal recognition of tribal status
Chinooks occur when a mountain range is exposed to a strong winds blowing at right angles, or near right angles to the direction of the mountain ridge Moist air is forced up the mountains bringing both cloud and precipitation to the windward side The descending air then becomes warmer and drier as it is forced down the leeward side of the mountains The relatively warm, dry gusty winds that occasionally occur to the leeward side of mountain ranges around the world are known by many names In Canada and the northern United States, they are referred to as Chinooks In the southern states, they are known as Santa Ana and in parts of Europe, foehn winds
the name given to the foehn in North America, especially used on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains and Sierras
One of a tribe of North American Indians now living in the state of Washington, noted for the custom of flattening their skulls
(Shi NUK or chi NUK) A collective name for various American Indian tribes living on the Northwest coast (near the Columbia River) at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition They lived in houses made of wooden planks Salmon fishing and hunting was their main subsistence pattern
pink or white flesh of large Pacific salmon
A warm, dry wind experienced along the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada Most common in winter and spring, it can result in a rise in temperature of 20C (35 to 40F) in a quarter of an hour
Chinooks also called Flathead Indians
A warm, dry wind that blows along the east slopes of the northern Rocky Mountains
a Penutian language spoken by the Chinook people
a warm, dry wind which mainly affects the foothills of the Rockies, it can raise temperatures 20 degrees within minutes
Boeing CH47 Twin Rotor Transport Helicopter
warm dry wind that blows downhill on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains, North America
A warm westerly wind from the country of the Chinooks, sometimes experienced on the slope of the Rocky Mountains, in Montana and the adjacent territory
a warm dry wind blowing down the eastern slopes of the Rockies
A type of foehn wind Refers to the warm downslope wind in the Rocky Mountains that may occur after an intense cold spell when the temperature could rise by 20°F to 40°F in a matter of minutes
large Pacific salmon valued as food; adults die after spawning a member of an important North American Indian people who controlled the mouth of the Columbia river; they were organized into settlements rather than tribes a warm dry wind blowing down the eastern slopes of the Rockies
The name given to the descending, warm, dry wind on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains The chinook generally blows from the southwest, but its direction may be modified by topography When it sets in after a spell of intense cold, the temperature may rise by 20°F to 40°F in 15 minutes due to replacement of a cold air mass with a much warmer air mass in minutes
large Pacific salmon valued as food; adults die after spawning
a member of an important North American Indian people who controlled the mouth of the Columbia river; they were organized into settlements rather than tribes
A jargon of words from various languages (the largest proportion of which is from that of the Chinooks) generally understood by all the Indian tribes of the northwestern territories of the United States
A type of foehn wind Refers to the warm downslope wind in the Rocky Mountains that may occur after an intense cold spell when the temperatures may rise 20-40 degrees in a matter of minutes
Chinook Jargon
A pidginized Native American language used by various tribes of the Pacific Northwest
Chinook Jargon
A pidgin language combining words from Nootka, Chinook, Salishan languages, French, and English, formerly used as a lingua franca in the Pacific Northwest
Chinook salmon
A very large, commercially valuable salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) of northern Pacific waters, characterized by irregular black spots on its back. Also called king salmon, quinnat salmon. or king salmon Prized North Pacific food and sport fish (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) of the salmon family. The average weight is about 22 lbs (10 kg), but individuals of 50-80 lbs (22-36 kg) are not unusual. Chinook salmon are silvery, with round black spots. In fresh water they are found from the Amur River of Asia northward and, across the Bering Sea, southward to the Sacramento River of North America. Their range in the open ocean extends farther south. During spring spawning runs, adults swim as far as 2,000 mi (3,200 km) up the Yukon River, spawn, and then die. Young chinook salmon enter the sea when one to three years old. They were successfully introduced into Lake Michigan, creating a new sport fishery after the virtual elimination of lake trout by sea lampreys in the mid 20th century
chinook jargon
a pidgin incorporating Chinook and French and English words; formerly used as a lingua franca in northwestern North America
chinook salmon
pink or white flesh of large Pacific salmon
chinook state
Washington a nickname
chinook state
See Chinook, n
chinook

    Heceleme

    chi·nook

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    şînûk

    Telaffuz

    /sʜəˈno͝ok/ /ʃɪˈnʊk/

    Etimoloji

    [ sh&-'nuk, ch&-, -'n&uu ] (noun.) 1795. Lower Chehalis cinúk, name of a Chinook village.

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