automobile

listen to the pronunciation of automobile
İngilizce - Türkçe
otomobil

Otomobiller fabrikalarda yapılır. - Automobiles are made in factories.

Otomobil elektrikle çalışır. - The automobile runs on electricity.

araba

Binlerce Amerikalı araba sahibiydi. - Thousands of Americans owned automobiles.

Bir araba fabrikasında yedek parça yapıyoruz. - We are producing spare parts in an automobile factory.

otomobıl
motorlu araç
binek taşıt
binek araba
otomobilin
automobile battery
araba aküsü
automobile engine
araba motoru
automobile insurance
araba sigortası
automobile race
araba yarışı
automobile tire
araba lastiği
automobile traffic
araba trafiği
automobile factory
otomobil fabrikası
automobile flag
(Askeri) OTO FORSU: Bir generalin resmi otomobiline icabında takılan fors. Bu fors, kullananın makam veya rütbesini bildirir
general german automobile association
Genel Alman otomobil derneği
escape automobile
çalıntı araba
individual automobile credit
(Ticaret) ferdi otomobil kredisi
İngilizce - İngilizce
To travel by automobile
A type of vehicle designed to move on the ground under its own stored power and intended to carry a driver, a small number of additional passengers, and a very limited amount of other load
n a vehicle with wheels used to carry people; a car
a self-propelled vehicle suitable for use on a street or roadway
An automobile is a car. Four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation, commonly propelled by an internal combustion engine using a volatile fuel. The modern automobile consists of about 14,000 parts, divided into several structural and mechanical systems. These include the steel body, containing the passenger and storage space, which sits on the chassis or steel frame; the internal combustion gasoline engine, which powers the car by means of a transmission; the steering and braking systems, which control the car's motion; and the electrical system, which includes a battery, alternator, and other devices. Subsystems involve fuel, exhaust, lubrication, cooling, suspension, and tires. Though experimental vehicles were built in the 18th and mid-19th century, not until the 1880s did Gottlieb Daimler and Karl Benz in Germany begin separately to manufacture cars commercially. In the U.S., James and William Packard and Ransom Olds were among the first auto manufacturers, and by 1898 there were 50 U.S. manufacturers. Some early cars operated by steam engine, such as those made from c. 1902 by Francis E. and Freelan O. Stanley. The internal combustion engine was used by Henry Ford when he introduced the Model T in 1908; Ford would soon revolutionize the industry with his use of the assembly line. In the 1930s European manufacturers began to make small, affordable cars such as the Volkswagen. In the 1950s and '60s, U.S. automakers produced larger, more luxurious cars with more automatic features. In the 1970s and '80s Japanese manufacturers exported their small, reliable, fuel-efficient cars worldwide, and their increasing popularity spurred U.S. automakers to produce similar models. See also axle, brake, bus, carburetor, electric automobile, fuel injection, motorcycle, truck. automobile racing electric automobile suspension automobile United Automobile Workers United Automobile Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America UAW
> qiche
for ordinary vehicles, ranging from the run- about to the touring car, up to as high as 200 H
any self-propelled land vehicle of a type that must be registered and licensed in the State in which it is owned
Coverage for vehicles and trailers used personally or in a farm/business operation
steam engines, or electric motors
The power of the driving motor varies from about 4 to 50 H
for specially built racing cars
Automobiles are usually propelled by internal combustion engines using volatile inflammable liquids, as gasoline or petrol, alcohol, naphtha, etc
Automobiles are also commonly, and generally in British usage, called motor cars
An enclosed passenger vehicle powered by an engine
4-wheeled motor vehicle; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
n mobil
n A transportation device hailed as the solution to the problem of providing transit without creating the pollution generated by a horse
{i} car, auto
subset of road users with a motorized vehicle - not allowed on the lanes reserved for cyclists
An automobile vehicle or mechanism; esp
travel in an automobile
1 own body; 2 health problems; 3 car (literally) see also car
automobile racing
auto racing
automobile-racing
Attributive form of automobile racing

automobile-racing participant.

Automobile Association
{i} organization that provides its members with emergency road assistance (towing, etc.) and other automobile services (maps, travel planning, etc.)
automobile engine
the engine that propels an automobile
automobile factory
a factory where automobiles are manufactured
automobile fleet
total vehicles, number of vehicles
automobile horn
a device on an automobile for making a warning noise
automobile industry
the manufacturers of automobiles considered collectively
automobile insurance
insurance against loss due to theft or traffic accidents
automobile loan
a personal loan to purchase an automobile
automobile mechanic
one who services and repairs automobiles
automobile mechanic
someone whose occupation is repairing and maintaining automobiles
automobile mechanics
people who repair cars, auto repairmen
automobile race
a race between (usually high-performance) automobiles
automobile racing
Sport practiced in a variety of forms on roads, tracks, or closed circuits. It includes Grand Prix racing, speedway racing (including the Indianapolis 500), stock-car racing, sports-car racing, drag racing, midget-car racing, and karting, as well as hill climbs and rally driving. The International Motor Sports Hall of Fame is located in Talladega, Ala., U.S. There is no central governing body for automobile racing in the U.S. as there is in most other countries
automobile suspension
Elastic members designed to cushion the impact of road irregularities on a portion of an automotive vehicle. The members link the vehicle's tires with its suspended portion, and usually consist of springs and shock absorbers. Spring elements used for automobile suspension members include (in increasing order of ability to store elastic energy per unit of weight) leaf springs, coil springs, torsion bars, rubber-in-shear devices, and air springs. The springs absorb the energy of impacts of the tires along the road surface, and the shocks damp or dissipate that energy, using hydraulics, so that the suspended portion of the vehicle does not keep bouncing
automobile test
car test, evaluation of an automobile's level of functioning
automobile traffic
cars coming and going
automobile.
cage
Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America UAW United Automobile
in full United Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) U.S. industrial union of automotive and other vehicular workers, headquartered in Detroit. The UAW was founded in 1935, when the Committee for Industrial Organization (see AFL-CIO) began to organize automotive workers. The union successfully countered automakers' initial resistance with sit-down strikes and a 1937 Supreme Court decision upholding the right to organize as declared in the Wagner Act. General Motors Corp. was the first to recognize the UAW, and most other automakers followed suit, though Ford Motor Co. continued its resistance until 1941. Under Walter Reuther, the union won contracts providing for cost-of-living adjustments, health plans, and vacations. Reuther's friction with George Meany led the UAW to withdraw from the AFL-CIO in 1968. A short-lived alliance with the Teamsters was dissolved in 1972, and the UAW rejoined the AFL-CIO in 1981. Competition from foreign imports eroded the union's benefits in the 1980s and '90s
Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America United Automobile
in full United Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) U.S. industrial union of automotive and other vehicular workers, headquartered in Detroit. The UAW was founded in 1935, when the Committee for Industrial Organization (see AFL-CIO) began to organize automotive workers. The union successfully countered automakers' initial resistance with sit-down strikes and a 1937 Supreme Court decision upholding the right to organize as declared in the Wagner Act. General Motors Corp. was the first to recognize the UAW, and most other automakers followed suit, though Ford Motor Co. continued its resistance until 1941. Under Walter Reuther, the union won contracts providing for cost-of-living adjustments, health plans, and vacations. Reuther's friction with George Meany led the UAW to withdraw from the AFL-CIO in 1968. A short-lived alliance with the Teamsters was dissolved in 1972, and the UAW rejoined the AFL-CIO in 1981. Competition from foreign imports eroded the union's benefits in the 1980s and '90s
American Automobile Association
organization which provides emergency road repairs (including towing, gas delivery, etc.)
An automobile
auto
United Automobile Workers
in full United Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW) U.S. industrial union of automotive and other vehicular workers, headquartered in Detroit. The UAW was founded in 1935, when the Committee for Industrial Organization (see AFL-CIO) began to organize automotive workers. The union successfully countered automakers' initial resistance with sit-down strikes and a 1937 Supreme Court decision upholding the right to organize as declared in the Wagner Act. General Motors Corp. was the first to recognize the UAW, and most other automakers followed suit, though Ford Motor Co. continued its resistance until 1941. Under Walter Reuther, the union won contracts providing for cost-of-living adjustments, health plans, and vacations. Reuther's friction with George Meany led the UAW to withdraw from the AFL-CIO in 1968. A short-lived alliance with the Teamsters was dissolved in 1972, and the UAW rejoined the AFL-CIO in 1981. Competition from foreign imports eroded the union's benefits in the 1980s and '90s
automobiles
Plural of automobile
automobiles
dated, third-person singular of automobile
electric automobile
Battery-powered motor vehicle. Originating in the 1880s, electric cars were used for private passenger, truck, and bus transportation in cities, where their low speeds and limited battery range were not drawbacks, and the cars became popular for their quietness and low maintenance costs. Until 1920 they were competitive with gasoline-fueled cars; they became less so after the electric self-starter made gasoline-powered cars more attractive and mass production made them cheaper to produce. In Europe electric vehicles have been used as short-range delivery vans. Renewed interest in electric cars beginning in the 1970s, spurred especially by new consciousness of foreign oil dependency and environmental concern, led to improvements in speed and range. Recent laws, particularly in California, have mandated commercial production. "Hybrid" cars employing both electric and internal combustion engines and providing the best features of both technologies, have recently become commercially available. Experimental vehicles have used solar fuel cells
automobile