roger

listen to the pronunciation of roger
الإنجليزية - التركية
tamam!
anlaşıldı!
evet! peki!
Anlaşıldı, tamam! Bir telsiz telefon haberinin alındığını bildirmek için kullanılan ifade
ANLAşıLDı: Bir telsiz telefon haberinin alındığını bildirmek için kullanılan kelime
(isim) roger
{i} roger
dili Evet! Peki!
(Askeri) mesaj alındı ve anlaşıldı
(Askeri) ANLAŞILDI: Bir telsiz telefon haberinin alındığını bildirmek için kullanılan kelime. Bu kelime (received-alındı) kelimesi yerine kullanılan "R" harfi karşılığıdır
anlaşıldı
tamam
roger that
anlaşıldı
roger that
ok
roger that
Anlaşıldı, tamam! Bir telsiz telefon haberinin alındığını bildirmek için kullanılan ifade
roger reflexe
(Tıp) roger refleksi
roger souffle
(Tıp) roger üfürümü
roger that
tamam
Jolly Roger
korsan bayrağı
who framed roger rabbit
kim roger rabbit çerçeveli
التركية - التركية

تعريف roger في التركية التركية القاموس.

roger federer
Teniste, 2006 sezonunun 3. Grand Slam mücadelesi olan Wimbledon turnuvasında, tek erkekler şampiyonu isveçli tenisçi
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
A male given name
To have sexual intercourse
Of a man, to have sexual intercourse with (someone), especially in a rough manner
Received (used in radio communications to acknowledge that a message has been received and understood)

Roger, sir.

given name, male
{i} male first name
Jolly Roger. to have sex with someone. born Dec. 22, 1095 died Feb. 26, 1154, Palermo Grand count of Sicily (1105-30) and king of Sicily (1130-54). The son of Roger I, he was a capable and energetic ruler who incorporated the mainland territories of Calabria (1122) and Apulia (1127). He was crowned king by the antipope Anacletus II, and he forced Innocent II to confirm him in 1139. He built a powerful navy but refused to join the Second Crusade, preferring as the ruler of a largely Arab population to show tolerance toward Muslims. He promulgated a law code (1140), and his court was an intellectual center for both Arab and Western scholars. known as Roger Guiscard born 1031, Normandy, France died June 22, 1101, Mileto, Calabria Count of Sicily (1072-1101). A Norman knight, he went to Italy (1057) to help his brother Robert Guiscard take Calabria from the Byzantines (1060). They launched a campaign to conquer Sicily from the Muslims (1061). When they captured Palermo (1072), Roger was granted a limited right to govern Sicily and Calabria. After Robert's death, he gained full right to govern and created an efficient centralized government. Ascham Roger Bacon Roger Baldwin Roger Nash Bannister Sir Roger Gilbert Casement Sir Roger David Clemens William Roger Pierre Roger Corman Roger William Cray Seymour Roger Fenton Roger Fry Roger Eliot Guillemin Roger Charles Louis Maris Roger Roger Eugene Maris Martin du Gard Roger Peterson Roger Tory Roger II Roger I Roger Guiscard Saint Exupéry Antoine Marie Roger de Sessions Roger Huntington Shepard Roger Newland Sherman Roger Sperry Roger Staubach Roger Thomas Taney Roger Brooke Roger of Helmarshausen Vadim Plemiannikov Roger Williams Roger
Commonly used word in aviation communications Just like "10-4" in other types of communications, it means that the instruction has been understood Also, to roger is to repeat the instruction as to make sure it has been clearly understood
Used when you're not sure what else to say
A guard in the dungeons of Amber Castle, also a writer
I have received all of your last transmission It should not be used to answer a question requiring a yes or a no answer
{ü} OK!, the message has been received (used in wireless communication)
A black flag with white skull and crossbones, formerly used by pirates; called also Jolly Roger
Roger Ascham
born 1515, Kirby Wiske, near York, Eng. died Dec. 30, 1568, London English humanist, scholar, and writer. He entered Cambridge University at age 14 and studied Greek. He became the future Queen Elizabeth I's tutor in Greek and Latin (1548-50) and continued to serve her after she took the throne. His best-known book is the posthumous The Scholemaster (1570), which deals with the psychology of learning, the education of the whole person, and the ideal moral and intellectual personality that education should mold. He is notable also for his lucid prose style and his promotion of the vernacular
Roger B Taney
born March 17, 1777, Calvert county, Md., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1864, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist. A lawyer from 1801, he served in Maryland's legislature before being named state attorney general (1827-31). He was appointed U.S. attorney general in 1831 by Pres. Andrew Jackson and achieved national prominence by opposing the Bank of the United States. In 1833 Jackson nominated him to serve as secretary of the treasury, but his appointment was rejected by the Senate. In 1835 Jackson selected him to serve as associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, and after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall, Jackson sought to have him confirmed as chief justice. Despite powerful resistance led by Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, and Daniel Webster, Taney was sworn in as chief justice in March 1836. His tenure (1836-64) remains the second longest in the Supreme Court's history. He is remembered principally for the Dred Scott decision (1857), in which he argued that a slave was not a citizen and could not sue in a federal court, that Congress had no power to exclude slavery from the territories, and that blacks could not become citizens. He is also noted for his opinion in Abelman v. Booth (1858), which denied state power to obstruct the processes of the federal courts, and in Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge (1837), which declared that rights not specifically conferred by a charter could not be inferred from the language of the document. Though he considered slavery an evil, he believed its elimination should be brought about gradually and chiefly by the states in which it existed
Roger Bacon
born 1220, Ilchester, Somerset, or Bisley, Gloucester?, Eng. died 1292, Oxford English scientist and philosopher. He was educated at Oxford and the University of Paris and joined the Franciscan order in 1247. He displayed a prodigious energy and zeal in the pursuit of experimental science; his studies eventually won him a place in popular literature as a worker of wonders. He was the first European to describe in detail the process of making gunpowder, and he proposed flying machines and motorized ships and carriages. He therefore represents a historically precocious expression of the empirical spirit of experimental science, even though his actual practice of it seems to have been exaggerated. His philosophical thought was essentially Aristotelian, though he was critical of the methods of theologians such as Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas, arguing that a more accurate experimental knowledge of nature would be of great value in confirming the Christian faith. He also wrote on mathematics and logic. He was condemned to prison 1277 by his fellow Franciscans because of "suspected novelties" in his teaching
Roger Baldwin
born Jan. 21, 1884, Wellesley, Mass., U.S. died Aug. 26, 1981, Ridgewood, N.J. U.S. civil-rights leader. Born into an aristocratic Massachusetts family, Baldwin attended Harvard University and taught sociology at Washington University (1906-09) in St. Louis, where he also was chief probation officer of the city's juvenile court and secretary of its Civic League. When the U.S. entered World War I, he became director of the pacifist American Union Against Militarism, the predecessor of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). As the ACLU's director (1920-50) and national chairman (1950-55), he made civil rights, once a predominantly leftist cause, a universal one
Roger Brooke Taney
born March 17, 1777, Calvert county, Md., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1864, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist. A lawyer from 1801, he served in Maryland's legislature before being named state attorney general (1827-31). He was appointed U.S. attorney general in 1831 by Pres. Andrew Jackson and achieved national prominence by opposing the Bank of the United States. In 1833 Jackson nominated him to serve as secretary of the treasury, but his appointment was rejected by the Senate. In 1835 Jackson selected him to serve as associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, and after the death of Chief Justice John Marshall, Jackson sought to have him confirmed as chief justice. Despite powerful resistance led by Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, and Daniel Webster, Taney was sworn in as chief justice in March 1836. His tenure (1836-64) remains the second longest in the Supreme Court's history. He is remembered principally for the Dred Scott decision (1857), in which he argued that a slave was not a citizen and could not sue in a federal court, that Congress had no power to exclude slavery from the territories, and that blacks could not become citizens. He is also noted for his opinion in Abelman v. Booth (1858), which denied state power to obstruct the processes of the federal courts, and in Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge (1837), which declared that rights not specifically conferred by a charter could not be inferred from the language of the document. Though he considered slavery an evil, he believed its elimination should be brought about gradually and chiefly by the states in which it existed
Roger C L Guillemin
born Jan. 11, 1924, Dijon, Fr. French-born U.S. physiologist. He and his colleagues discovered, isolated, and synthesized hypothalamic hormones that regulate thyroid activity, cause the pituitary to release growth hormone, and regulate the activities of the pituitary and the pancreas. He shared a 1977 Nobel Prize with Andrew V. Schally and Rosalyn Yalow. Guillemin is also known for his discovery of endorphins
Roger Charles Louis Guillemin
born Jan. 11, 1924, Dijon, Fr. French-born U.S. physiologist. He and his colleagues discovered, isolated, and synthesized hypothalamic hormones that regulate thyroid activity, cause the pituitary to release growth hormone, and regulate the activities of the pituitary and the pancreas. He shared a 1977 Nobel Prize with Andrew V. Schally and Rosalyn Yalow. Guillemin is also known for his discovery of endorphins
Roger Clemens
born Aug. 4, 1962, Dayton, Ohio, U.S. U.S. baseball pitcher. Clemens played for the Boston Red Sox (1984-96), Toronto Blue Jays (1997-1998), New York Yankees (1999-2003), and Houston Astros (from 2004). In 1986 he became the first pitcher to strike out 20 batters in a single (nine-inning) game; he later tied his own record (1996). He won the Cy Young Award for best pitcher six times (1986, 1987, 1991, 1997, 1998, 2001)
Roger Corman
born April 5, 1926, Detroit, Mich., U.S. U.S. film director and producer. He directed his first films, Five Guns West and Apache Woman,in 1955, and by 1960 he was one of the most prolific makers of low-budget "exploitation" films. His film versions of stories by Edgar Allan Poe, including The House of Usher (1960) and The Masque of the Red Death (1964), won him a cult following as a master of the macabre. In 1970 he formed New World Pictures, an independent distribution company that produced the work of such struggling young directors as Peter Bogdanovich, Francis Ford Coppola, and Martin Scorsese
Roger Daltrey
{i} (born 1944) British rock and roll singer, member of the British band "The Who
Roger Donaldson
{i} (born 1945) Australian born movie director and producer (directed the 1987 movie "No Way Out")
Roger Eliot Fry
born Dec. 14, 1866, London, Eng. died Sept. 9, 1934, London British art critic and artist. He gave up a career in science to study art in Italy. As a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1906-10), he discovered the work of the Post-Impressionists, and in 1910 he introduced Post-Impressionism to Britain by organizing the first of two highly significant exhibitions. With Clive Bell, Fry preached the importance of "significant form" over content in the artwork. Associated with the Bloomsbury group, he and several group members cofounded the Omega Workshops for arts and crafts in 1913. He was known as a brilliant lecturer and the author of numerous books
Roger Fenton
born 1819, Heywood, Eng. died Aug. 8, 1869, London British photographer. In 1853 he helped found the Royal Photographic Society of London. In 1854 he was appointed the government's official photographer and sent to document the Crimean War. He shot some 360 photographs of the war; although they largely represent a glorified overview, showing very little of the real action or agony of war, they represent the first extensive photographic documentation of a war. On his return he exhibited successfully in London and Paris
Roger Fry
born Dec. 14, 1866, London, Eng. died Sept. 9, 1934, London British art critic and artist. He gave up a career in science to study art in Italy. As a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1906-10), he discovered the work of the Post-Impressionists, and in 1910 he introduced Post-Impressionism to Britain by organizing the first of two highly significant exhibitions. With Clive Bell, Fry preached the importance of "significant form" over content in the artwork. Associated with the Bloomsbury group, he and several group members cofounded the Omega Workshops for arts and crafts in 1913. He was known as a brilliant lecturer and the author of numerous books
Roger Huntington Sessions
born Dec. 28, 1896, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died March 16, 1985, Princeton, N.J. U.S. composer. He attended Harvard and Yale, lived in Italy and Germany (1925-33), and later taught principally at Princeton University (1935-45, 1953-65). His early interest in Neoclassicism was replaced 1953 by his adoption of serialism. His works include the operas The Trial of Lucullus (1947) and Montezuma (1963), incidental music to The Black Maskers (1923), eight symphonies, a Concerto for Orchestra (1982, Pulitzer Prize), and the cantata When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom'd (1970), as well as several widely read books on music
Roger Keith Barrett
{i} Syd Barrett (1946-2006), British guitarist and former member of the music band Pink Floyd
Roger Maris
a US baseball player who played for the New York Yankees team and is famous for hitting 61 home runs in 1961, which broke the record of Babe Ruth (1934-85). in full Roger Eugene Maris born Sept. 10, 1934, Hibbing, Minn., U.S. died Dec. 14, 1985, Houston, Texas U.S. baseball player. Maris's family moved from Minnesota to North Dakota when he was 10, and there he excelled in high school sports, playing American Legion baseball in Fargo in the summer. An outfielder and left-handed hitter, he played for the Cleveland Indians, the New York Yankees, and the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1961 his one-season total of 61 home runs broke Babe Ruth's long-standing record of 60, edging out his Yankee teammate Mickey Mantle. Maris's record stood until 1998, when it was broken by Mark McGwire's 70 and Sammy Sosa's
Roger Maris
See also Barry Bonds
Roger Martin du Gard
born March 23, 1881, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France died Aug. 22, 1958, Bellême French novelist and dramatist. Originally trained as a paleographer and archivist, he brought to his literary works a spirit of objectivity and a scrupulous regard for detail. He first attracted attention with the novel Jean Barois (1913), the story of an intellectual torn between the Roman Catholic faith of his childhood and the scientific materialism of his maturity. He is best known for the eight-novel cycle Les Thibault (1922-40), the record of a family's development that chronicles the social and moral issues facing the French bourgeoisie in the pre-World War I era. He received the 1937 Nobel Prize for Literature
Roger Moore
(born 1927) British television and film actor, star of the James Bond films "Live and Let Die" and "A View to a Kill
Roger N Shepard
born Jan. 30, 1929, Palo Alto, Calif., U.S. U.S. psychologist and cognitive scientist. He received a Ph.D. from Yale University and later worked at Bell Laboratories (1958-66) and taught at Stanford University (from 1968). He is known for his work in multidimensional scaling, the use of spatial models to show similarities and dissimilarities among data. He has also examined the phenomena of "mental rotation," a form of image transformation. He received the National Medal of Science in 1995
Roger Nash Baldwin
born Jan. 21, 1884, Wellesley, Mass., U.S. died Aug. 26, 1981, Ridgewood, N.J. U.S. civil-rights leader. Born into an aristocratic Massachusetts family, Baldwin attended Harvard University and taught sociology at Washington University (1906-09) in St. Louis, where he also was chief probation officer of the city's juvenile court and secretary of its Civic League. When the U.S. entered World War I, he became director of the pacifist American Union Against Militarism, the predecessor of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). As the ACLU's director (1920-50) and national chairman (1950-55), he made civil rights, once a predominantly leftist cause, a universal one
Roger Newland Shepard
born Jan. 30, 1929, Palo Alto, Calif., U.S. U.S. psychologist and cognitive scientist. He received a Ph.D. from Yale University and later worked at Bell Laboratories (1958-66) and taught at Stanford University (from 1968). He is known for his work in multidimensional scaling, the use of spatial models to show similarities and dissimilarities among data. He has also examined the phenomena of "mental rotation," a form of image transformation. He received the National Medal of Science in 1995
Roger Sessions
born Dec. 28, 1896, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died March 16, 1985, Princeton, N.J. U.S. composer. He attended Harvard and Yale, lived in Italy and Germany (1925-33), and later taught principally at Princeton University (1935-45, 1953-65). His early interest in Neoclassicism was replaced 1953 by his adoption of serialism. His works include the operas The Trial of Lucullus (1947) and Montezuma (1963), incidental music to The Black Maskers (1923), eight symphonies, a Concerto for Orchestra (1982, Pulitzer Prize), and the cantata When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom'd (1970), as well as several widely read books on music
Roger Sherman
born April 19, 1721, Newton, Mass. died July 23, 1793, New Haven, Conn., U.S. American jurist and politician. Active in trade and law in Connecticut, he served as judge of the superior court (1766-85) and mayor of New Haven (1784-93). A delegate to the Continental Congress, he signed the Declaration of Independence and helped draft the Articles of Confederation. At the Constitutional Convention, he proposed a compromise on congressional representation that combined facets of the two opposing plans by the large and small states. The result, called the Connecticut (or Great) Compromise, which was incorporated into the Constitution, provided for a bicameral legislature with representation based on population in one house (House of Representatives) and on the principle of equality in the other (Senate)
Roger Sperry
born Aug. 20, 1913, Hartford, Conn., U.S. died April 17, 1994, Pasadena, Calif. U.S. neurobiologist. He earned a doctorate in zoology from the University of Chicago. He studied functional specialization in the hemispheres of the cerebral cortex, examining animals and then humans with epilepsy in whose brains the corpus callosum had been severed. His research showed that the left side of the brain is normally dominant for analytical and verbal tasks and the right for spatial tasks, music, and certain other areas. His techniques laid the groundwork for much more specialized explorations. He shared a 1981 Nobel Prize with David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel
Roger Staubach
born Feb. 5, 1942, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. U.S. football player. He compiled a notable record at the U.S. Naval Academy (1962-65), where he made All-American and won the Heisman Trophy (1963). His professional career was spent as quarterback with the Dallas Cowboys (1969-79), which he helped make into a dominant team, leading them to the play-offs in every year but one (1974) and to four Super Bowls (won 1972, 1978; lost 1976, 1979)
Roger Thomas Staubach
born Feb. 5, 1942, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. U.S. football player. He compiled a notable record at the U.S. Naval Academy (1962-65), where he made All-American and won the Heisman Trophy (1963). His professional career was spent as quarterback with the Dallas Cowboys (1969-79), which he helped make into a dominant team, leading them to the play-offs in every year but one (1974) and to four Super Bowls (won 1972, 1978; lost 1976, 1979)
Roger Tory Peterson
born Aug. 28, 1908, Jamestown, N.Y., U.S. died July 28, 1996, Old Lyme, Conn. U.S. ornithologist. He started drawing birds in high school. His Field Guide to the Birds (1934), illustrated with paintings that stressed the features that best identified a species in the field, greatly stimulated public interest in bird study in the U.S. and Europe. Many other guides followed. More responsible than any other person for fostering a widespread awareness of birds by the American public, he received such awards as the American Ornithologists' Union's Brewster Medal (1944) and the World Wildlife Fund's Gold Medal (1972)
Roger Vadim
v. born Jan. 26, 1928, Paris, France died Feb. 11, 2000, Paris French film director. After working briefly as a stage actor in the mid-1940s, he began his film career as an assistant on Juliette (1953). He directed and cowrote the highly successful erotic film And God Created Woman (1956), which established his wife, Brigitte Bardot, as a sex symbol. He duplicated this winning formula with two later wives, Annette Stroyberg in Dangerous Liaisons (1959) and Jane Fonda in Barbarella (1968), and his lover, Catherine Deneuve, in Vice and Virtue (1962)
Roger Vadim Plemiannikov
v. born Jan. 26, 1928, Paris, France died Feb. 11, 2000, Paris French film director. After working briefly as a stage actor in the mid-1940s, he began his film career as an assistant on Juliette (1953). He directed and cowrote the highly successful erotic film And God Created Woman (1956), which established his wife, Brigitte Bardot, as a sex symbol. He duplicated this winning formula with two later wives, Annette Stroyberg in Dangerous Liaisons (1959) and Jane Fonda in Barbarella (1968), and his lover, Catherine Deneuve, in Vice and Virtue (1962)
Roger William Corman
born April 5, 1926, Detroit, Mich., U.S. U.S. film director and producer. He directed his first films, Five Guns West and Apache Woman,in 1955, and by 1960 he was one of the most prolific makers of low-budget "exploitation" films. His film versions of stories by Edgar Allan Poe, including The House of Usher (1960) and The Masque of the Red Death (1964), won him a cult following as a master of the macabre. In 1970 he formed New World Pictures, an independent distribution company that produced the work of such struggling young directors as Peter Bogdanovich, Francis Ford Coppola, and Martin Scorsese
Roger Williams
{i} (1603-1683) founder of Rhode Island
Roger Williams
born 1603?, London, Eng. died Jan. 27/March 15, 1683, Providence, R.I. English clergyman, colonist, and founder of Rhode Island. He arrived in Boston in 1631 and became pastor of the separatist Plymouth colony (1632-33). Banned from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for his beliefs, including his support for religious toleration and the rights of Indians and his opposition to civil authority, he founded the colony of Rhode Island and the town of Providence (1636) on land purchased from the Narragansett Indians. The colony established a democratic government and instituted separation of church and state, and it became a haven for Quakers and others seeking religious liberty. He obtained a charter for the colony (1643) and served as its first president, maintaining friendly relations with the Indians and acting as peacemaker for nearby colonies
Jolly Roger
the traditional flag used on European and American pirate ships; often pictured as a white skull and crossbones on a black field; the blackjack

The Hispaniola still lay where she had anchored; but, sure enough, there was the Jolly Roger - the black flag of piracy - flying from her peak.

Rogers
A town in Arkansas, and other U.S. places named for bearers of the surname
rogering
An act of sexual intercourse, especially one that is rough

When I get you home I'm going to give you a good rogering.

Jolly Roger
a black flag with a picture of bones on it, used in the past by pirates = skull and crossbones (jolly + the male name Roger)
Murder of Roger Ackroyd
a famous detective story by Agatha Christie. When the book was published in 1926, it caused a lot of controversy (=serious disagreement) among readers because the narrator is shown to be the murderer at the end of the story. Some people thought that Christie was cheating by using this type of plot
Rogers
American dancer and actress particularly noted for her partnership with Fred Astaire in several motion pictures, including Swing Time (1936). She won an Academy Award in 1940 for her performance in Kitty Foyle (1940). American sculptor noted for his groups of small sculptures, such as "Checkers up at the Farm" and "The Slave Auction" (both 1859). American soldier and frontiersman who led (1758-1763) the Rogers's Rangers on a series of daring missions during the French and Indian War. American singer and actor who played a singing cowboy in motion-picture Westerns. American humorist noted for his wry homespun commentary on American society and politics. Prince Rogers Nelson Brown Joseph Rogers Clark George Rogers Commons John Rogers Hornsby Rogers Rogers Carl Ransom Rogers Fred McFeely Rogers Ginger Rogers Robert Rogers Roy Leonard Franklin Slye Rogers Rogers William Penn Adair Samuel Shepard Rogers
Rogers
an English patronymic surname derived from Roger
Rogers
{i} family name
Rogers
a town in Arkansas
Seymour Roger Cray
born Sept. 28, 1925, Chippewa Falls, Wis., U.S. died Oct. 5, 1996, Colorado Springs, Colo. U.S. electronics engineer. He worked in the 1950s on the UNIVAC I, a landmark first-generation digital computer, and he led the design of the world's first transistor-based computer (the CDC 1604). In 1972 he founded Cray Research, Inc., and there built the fastest and most powerful supercomputers in the world, using his innovative multiprocessing design. The Cray-2 (1985) could perform 1.2 billion calculations per second, an incredible pace in its day
Sir Roger Bannister
a British runner who, in 1954, became the first person to run a mile in less than four minutes (1929- ). born March 23, 1929, Harrow, Middlesex, Eng. British runner. He attended the University of Oxford before earning a medical degree. In 1954 he became the first person to run a mile in less than four minutes (3 minutes 59.4 seconds). Many authorities had previously regarded the four-minute mile "barrier" as unbreakable. A neurologist, he wrote papers on the physiology of exercise, and he is said to have achieved his speed through scientific training methods
Sir Roger Casement
born Sept. 1, 1864, Kingstown, County Dublin, Ire. died Aug. 3, 1916, London, Eng. British civil servant and Irish rebel. As British consul in Africa (1895-1904) and Brazil (1906-11), he became famous for his reports revealing white traders' cruel exploitation of native labour in the Congo and in the Putumayo River region of Peru. Ill health forced his retirement to Ireland (1912), where he joined the Irish nationalists and helped form the Irish National Volunteers. After World War I broke out, he sought German support for the Irish independence movement. For his additional intrigue in the Easter Rising, he was convicted of treason and hanged. His execution made him an Irish martyr in the revolt against British rule in Ireland
Sir Roger David Casement
born Sept. 1, 1864, Kingstown, County Dublin, Ire. died Aug. 3, 1916, London, Eng. British civil servant and Irish rebel. As British consul in Africa (1895-1904) and Brazil (1906-11), he became famous for his reports revealing white traders' cruel exploitation of native labour in the Congo and in the Putumayo River region of Peru. Ill health forced his retirement to Ireland (1912), where he joined the Irish nationalists and helped form the Irish National Volunteers. After World War I broke out, he sought German support for the Irish independence movement. For his additional intrigue in the Easter Rising, he was convicted of treason and hanged. His execution made him an Irish martyr in the revolt against British rule in Ireland
Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister
born March 23, 1929, Harrow, Middlesex, Eng. British runner. He attended the University of Oxford before earning a medical degree. In 1954 he became the first person to run a mile in less than four minutes (3 minutes 59.4 seconds). Many authorities had previously regarded the four-minute mile "barrier" as unbreakable. A neurologist, he wrote papers on the physiology of exercise, and he is said to have achieved his speed through scientific training methods
Who Framed Roger Rabbit
1985 film that combined animation and live action (directed by Steven Spielberg)
William Roger Clemens
born Aug. 4, 1962, Dayton, Ohio, U.S. U.S. baseball pitcher. Clemens played for the Boston Red Sox (1984-96), Toronto Blue Jays (1997-1998), New York Yankees (1999-2003), and Houston Astros (from 2004). In 1986 he became the first pitcher to strike out 20 batters in a single (nine-inning) game; he later tied his own record (1996). He won the Cy Young Award for best pitcher six times (1986, 1987, 1991, 1997, 1998, 2001)
interjection roger 1
used in radio conversations to say that a message has been understood (Roger, male name used as a code word for the letter r (here standing for received))
rogered
past of roger
rogers
United States psychologist who developed client-centered therapy (1902-1987) United States dancer and film actress who partnered with Fred Astaire (born 1911) United States humorist remembered for his homespun commentary on politics and American society (1879-1935)
rogers
United States humorist remembered for his homespun commentary on politics and American society (1879-1935)
rogers
United States dancer and film actress who partnered with Fred Astaire (born 1911)
rogers
third-person singular of roger
rogers
United States psychologist who developed client-centered therapy (1902-1987)
التركية - الإنجليزية
Roger
roger refleksi
(Tıp) roger reflexe
roger üfürümü
(Tıp) roger souffle
roger

    الواصلة

    Rog·er

    التركية النطق

    räcır

    النطق

    /ˈräʤər/ /ˈrɑːʤɜr/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    [ 'rä-j&r ] (interjection.) circa 1941. From Proto-Germanic *hrothi (“fame”) + gār (“a spear”)/gēr (“a spear”).

    رصف المشتركة

    roger that

    فيديوهات

    ... And then Roger Bannister ran the mile in 3 ...
المفضلات