abraham

listen to the pronunciation of abraham
İngilizce - Türkçe
Yahudiliğin ilk peygamberi Hz. İbrahimin adı

Prophet Abraham.

{i} dalavereci
{i} sahte dilenci
(isim) Ibrahim
abraham's bosom
kutsal ölüler diyarı
prophet abraham
ibrahim peygamber
İngilizce - İngilizce
A male given name
A patronymic surname
A prophet in the Old Testament and Koran; the Semitic patriarch, father of the Jewish patriarch Isaac (by his wife Sarah) and the Arab patriarch Ishmael (by his concubine Hagar)

As one would expect of caravan people around 1900 B.C., the caravan people depicted in the Khnum-hotpe grave had donkeys, whereas the Bible says that Abraham and his people, who according to the traditional interpretation are supposed to have lived at the same period, already possessed camels.

A field adjoining the upper part of Quebec City, Canada. In 1759 the British under Gen. James Wolfe defeated the French under Gen. Louis Montcalm in a decisive battle of the French and Indian Wars. The victory led to British supremacy in Canada. in the Old Testament of the Bible, a religious leader who established the Jews as a nation. flourished early 2nd millennium BC First of the Hebrew patriarchs, revered by Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Genesis tells how Abraham, at 75, left Ur with his barren wife, Sarai (later Sarah), and others to found a new nation in Canaan. There God made a covenant with him, promising that his descendants would inherit the land and become a great nation. Abraham fathered Ishmael by Sarah's maidservant Hagar; Sarah herself bore Isaac, who inherited the covenant. Abraham's faith was tested when God ordered him to sacrifice Isaac; he was prepared to obey but God relented. In Judaism he is a model of virtue, in Christianity he is the father of all believers, and in Islam he is an ancestor of Muhammad and a model (in Sufism) of generosity. Abraham Karl Abraham Plains of Nelson Ahlgren Abraham Cowley Abraham Darby Abraham Dukas Paul Abraham Flexner Abraham Gallatin Abraham Alfonse Albert Geiger Abraham Grierson Sir George Abraham Heschel Abraham Joshua Idelsohn Abraham Zevi Kuyper Abraham Lincoln Abraham Maslow Abraham Harold Michelson Albert Abraham Pissarro Jacob Abraham Camille Quisling Vidkun Abraham Lauritz Jonsson Roentgen Abraham Abraham Stoker Waksman Selman Abraham Werner Abraham Gottlob
{i} first of the Old Testament patriarchs, father of Isaac and Ishmael, father of the Hebrew and Arabic people (Religion); holy figure in Islam; male first name
the first of the Old Testament patriarchs and the father of Isaac; according to Genesis, God promised to give Abraham's family (the Hebrews) the land of Canaan (the Promised Land); God tested Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his son; "Judaism, Christianity, and Islam each has a special claim on Abraham
Abraham Lincolns
plural form of Abraham Lincoln
Abraham man
One of a set of vagabonds / vagrants who, in the 1700s and 1800s, roamed through England, feigning mental illnesses to obtain alms
Abraham men
plural form of Abraham man
Abraham's bosom
The waiting place for the faithful dead between the crucifixion and the resurrection of Christ
Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin
born Jan. 29, 1761, Geneva, Switz. died Aug. 12, 1849, Astoria, N.Y., U.S. U.S. secretary of the treasury (1801-14). At 19 he immigrated to Pennsylvania, where he became successful in business and finance. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1795, he inaugurated the House Committee on Finance, a forerunner of the powerful Ways and Means Committee. As secretary of the treasury he reduced the national debt by $23 million. He opposed the War of 1812 and was instrumental in negotiating the Treaty of Ghent in 1814. After serving as minister to France (1816-23) and to Britain (1826-27), he was president of the National (later Gallatin) Bank in New York City (1831-39)
Abraham Colles
{i} (1773-1843) Irish anatomist and surgeon
Abraham Cowley
born 1618, London died July 28, 1667, Chertsey, Eng. British poet and essayist. He was a fellow at the University of Cambridge but was ejected for his political opinions during the English Civil Wars; he joined the queen's court, performing Royalist missions until 1656. In his poetic works which include The Mistress (1647, 1656), the unfinished epic Davideis (1656), and Pindarique Odes (1656), in which he adapted the Pindaric ode to English verse he used grossly elaborate, fanciful, poetic language that was more decorative than expressive. In his retirement he wrote sober, reflective essays
Abraham Darby
born 1678?, near Dudley, Worcestershire, Eng. died March 8, 1717, Madeley Court, Worcestershire British ironmaster. In 1709 Darby's Bristol Iron Co. became the first to successfully smelt iron ore with coke (see smelting). He demonstrated the superiority of coke in cost and efficiency by building much larger furnaces than were possible with charcoal as fuel. The quality of his iron made it possible to manufacture thin castings that rivaled brass for pots and other hollowware. Iron from his establishment was used for the cylinders of Thomas Newcomen's engines, for a cast-iron bridge, and for the first locomotive with a high-pressure boiler. See also Dud Dudley
Abraham Flexner
born Nov. 13, 1866, Louisville, Ky., U.S. died Sept. 21, 1959, Falls Church, Va. U.S. educator. He taught high school for almost 20 years. When the Carnegie Foundation asked him to evaluate the 155 U.S. and Canadian medical colleges, his report (1910) had a sensational impact; many of the colleges he severely criticized closed, and others revised their policies and curricula. Flexner thereafter channeled over half a billion dollars from the Rockefeller Foundation into improving U.S. medical education. In 1930 he founded the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., to which he brought some of the world's outstanding scientists
Abraham Geiger
born May 24, 1810, Frankfurt am Main, Ger. died Oct. 23, 1874, Berlin German Jewish theologian. He served as rabbi in Wiesbaden from 1832 and in Breslau 1838-63. He helped found a theological journal in 1835 and served as its editor. Geiger urged the need for simplified ritual, liturgy in one's native language, and emphasis on the prophetic writings as the core of Judaism, and he stressed the process of change and growth in Jewish religious consciousness, a basic idea in Reform Judaism
Abraham Gottlob Werner
born Sept. 25, 1750, Wehrau, Saxony died June 30, 1817, Freiberg German geologist. In opposition to the Plutonists, or Vulcanists, who argued that granite and many other rocks were of igneous origin, he founded the Neptunist school, which proclaimed that all rocks resulted from precipitation from oceans that had, he theorized, once completely covered the Earth. He rejected uniformitarianism. His brilliant lecturing and personal charm won him many students, who, though many eventually discarded his theories, would not renounce them while Werner lived
Abraham H Maslow
born April 1, 1908, New York, N.Y., U.S. died June 8, 1970, Menlo Park, Calif. U.S. psychologist. He taught at Brooklyn College (1937-51) and Brandeis University (1951-69). A practitioner of humanistic psychology, he is known for his theory of "self-actualization." In Motivation and Personality (1954) and Toward a Psychology of Being (1962), Maslow argued that each person has a hierarchy of needs that must be satisfied, ranging from basic physiological requirements to love, esteem, and, finally, self-actualization. As each need is satisfied, the next higher level in the emotional hierarchy dominates conscious functioning
Abraham Harold Maslow
born April 1, 1908, New York, N.Y., U.S. died June 8, 1970, Menlo Park, Calif. U.S. psychologist. He taught at Brooklyn College (1937-51) and Brandeis University (1951-69). A practitioner of humanistic psychology, he is known for his theory of "self-actualization." In Motivation and Personality (1954) and Toward a Psychology of Being (1962), Maslow argued that each person has a hierarchy of needs that must be satisfied, ranging from basic physiological requirements to love, esteem, and, finally, self-actualization. As each need is satisfied, the next higher level in the emotional hierarchy dominates conscious functioning
Abraham Idelsohn
born July 14, 1882, Felixberg, Latvia, Russian Empire died Aug. 14, 1938, Johannesburg, S.Af. Latvian musicologist. After studies in Germany he served as a synagogue cantor there (from 1903) before moving to Johannesburg and then to Jerusalem in 1905. Later he moved to the U.S., but after a stroke in 1934 he returned to Johannesburg. His monumental comparative studies of Jewish music in many parts of the world established that the tradition had remained relatively unchanged over time and also suggested connections between Jewish chant and the origins of Gregorian chant. He composed the first Hebrew opera, Yiftah (1922), and the song "Hava nagila
Abraham Joshua Heschel
born 1907, Warsaw, Pol., Russian Empire died Dec. 23, 1972, New York, N.Y., U.S. Polish-born U.S. Jewish philosopher and theologian. He studied at the University of Berlin and taught Jewish studies in Germany until he was deported by the Nazis in 1938. After coming to the U.S., he taught at Hebrew Union College and later at Jewish Theological Seminary. His goal was to devise a modern philosophy of religion based on ancient and medieval Judaic traditions, and he emphasized Judaism's prophetic and mystical aspects. Emphasizing social action as an expression of pious ethical concerns, he worked for black civil rights and against the Vietnam War. His writings include Man Is Not Alone (1951) and God in Search of Man (1956)
Abraham Kuyper
born Oct. 29, 1837, Maassluis, Neth. died Nov. 8, 1920, The Hague Dutch theologian and politician. After serving as a pastor (1863-74), he founded a Calvinist-oriented newspaper (1872) and was elected to the national assembly (1874). He formed the Anti-Revolutionary Party, the first organized Dutch political party, and built up a lower-middle-class following with a program that combined orthodox religious positions and a progressive social agenda. To provide Calvinist training for pastors, he founded the Free University at Amsterdam (1880), and in 1892 he founded the Reformed Churches in The Netherlands. As prime minister of The Netherlands (1901-05), he advocated a wider franchise and broader social benefits
Abraham Lincoln
{i} (1809-1865) 16th president of the United States (1861-1865)
Abraham Lincoln
a US politician in the Republican Party who was President of the US from 1861 to 1865. He won political support in the Northern US states because of his speeches against slavery, but this made him unpopular in the Southern states, where slaves did most of the farm work. The American Civil War started soon after he became President, when the Southern states decided to leave the US. In 1863 he announced the Emancipation Proclamation, by which all slaves in the US became free people. He also gave a famous speech known as the Gettysburg Address in 1863. A few days after the war ended, he was shot and killed in a theatre by an actor called John Wilkes Booth. Lincoln is one of the most important US presidents, and was sometimes called 'Honest Abe' because everyone admired his honesty (1809-65). born Feb. 12, 1809, near Hodgenville, Ky., U.S. died April 15, 1865, Washington, D.C. 16th president of the U.S. (1861-65). Born in a Kentucky log cabin, he moved to Indiana in 1816 and to Illinois in 1830. After working as a storekeeper, a rail-splitter, a postmaster, and a surveyor, he enlisted as a volunteer in the Black Hawk War (1832) and was elected captain of his company. He taught himself law and, having passed the bar examination, began practicing in Springfield, Ill., in 1836. As a successful circuit-riding lawyer from 1837, he was noted for his shrewdness, common sense, and honesty (earning the nickname "Honest Abe"). From 1834 to 1840 he served in the Illinois state legislature, and in 1847 he was elected as a Whig to the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1856 he joined the Republican Party, which nominated him as its candidate in the 1858 Senate election. In a series of seven debates with Stephen A. Douglas (the Lincoln-Douglas Debates), he argued against the extension of slavery into the territories. Though morally opposed to slavery, he was not an abolitionist; indeed, he attempted to rebut Douglas's charge that he was a dangerous radical, by reassuring audiences that he did not favour political equality for blacks. Despite his loss in the election, the debates brought him national attention. In the 1860 presidential election, he ran against Douglas again and won by a large margin in the electoral college, though he received only two-fifths of the popular vote. The South opposed his position on slavery in the territories, and before his inauguration seven Southern states had seceeded from the Union. The ensuing American Civil War completely consumed Lincoln's administration. He excelled as a wartime leader, creating a high command for directing all the country's energies and resources toward the war effort and combining statecraft and overall command of the armies with what some have called military genius. However, his abrogation of some civil liberties, especially the writ of habeas corpus, and the closing of several newspapers by his generals disturbed both Democrats and Republicans, including some members of his own cabinet. To unite the North and influence foreign opinion, he issued the Emancipation Proclamation (1863); his Gettysburg Address (1863) further ennobled the war's purpose. The continuing war affected some Northerners' resolve and his reelection was not assured, but strategic battle victories turned the tide, and he easily defeated George B. McClellan in 1864. His platform included passage of the 13th Amendment outlawing slavery (ratified 1865). At his second inaugural, with victory in sight, he spoke of moderation in reconstructing the South and building a harmonious Union. On April 14, five days after the war ended, he was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth
Abraham Mapu
(1808-1867) Lithuanian author who wrote in Hebrew
Abraham Roentgen
born 1711, Mühlheim, Cologne died 1793, Neuwied?, Trier German furniture designer and cabinetmaker. In 1750 he established a shop in Neuwied, near Cologne. The Rococo-style furniture he produced there was of outstanding quality and was often decorated with inlay work of ivory and other semiprecious materials. Much of his work was created for various German courts. His son David Roentgen (1743-1807), who succeeded him as head of the firm in 1772, was appointed cabinetmaker to Marie-Antoinette of France. The Roentgens' shop was perhaps the most successful firm of furniture production in the 18th century
Abraham Stoker
Abraham "Bram" Stoker (1847-1912), British writer, author of the novel "Dracula
Abraham Zevi Idelsohn
born July 14, 1882, Felixberg, Latvia, Russian Empire died Aug. 14, 1938, Johannesburg, S.Af. Latvian musicologist. After studies in Germany he served as a synagogue cantor there (from 1903) before moving to Johannesburg and then to Jerusalem in 1905. Later he moved to the U.S., but after a stroke in 1934 he returned to Johannesburg. His monumental comparative studies of Jewish music in many parts of the world established that the tradition had remained relatively unchanged over time and also suggested connections between Jewish chant and the origins of Gregorian chant. He composed the first Hebrew opera, Yiftah (1922), and the song "Hava nagila
Abraham our Father
Abraham the "father" of the Jewish people
abraham's bosom
the place where the just enjoy the peace of heaven after death
abraham¨
father of a multitude?
abraham¨
(Abram before Genesis 17; adj Abrahamic) The first father (patriarch) of Israel; first called Abram, God made a covenant with him in which God promised to make him a great nation; Isaac was his son by Sarah, and Ishmael was his son by Hagar See Chapter 2
abraham¨
an ancient Semite called out of ancient Babylon to serve the One God, and become the father of the nation of Israel
abraham¨
OT
abraham¨
father of a multitude, son of Terah, named (Gen 11: 27) before his older brothers Nahor and Haran, because he was the heir of the promises Till the age of seventy, Abram sojourned among his kindred in his native country of Chaldea He then, with his father and his family and household, quitted the city of Ur, in which he had hitherto dwelt, and went some 300 miles north to Haran, where he abode fifteen years The cause of his migration was a call from God (Acts 7: 2-4) There is no mention of this first call in the Old Testament; it is implied, however, in Gen 12 While they tarried at Haran, Terah died at the age of 205 years Abram now received a second and more definite call, accompanied by a promise from God (Gen 12: 1,2); whereupon he took his departure, taking his nephew Lot with him, "not knowing whither he went" (Heb 11: 8) He trusted implicitly to the guidance of Him who had called him
abraham¨
first well know Jewish person and one of the founders of the Jewish faith Muslims also respect him as a prophet and a worshipper of Allah
abraham¨
The father of the Jewish nation He and his group left Ur and started a new life in Canaan
abraham¨
the first of the Old Testament patriarchs and the father of Isaac; according to Genesis, God promised to give Abraham's family (the Hebrews) the land of Canaan (the Promised Land); God tested Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his son; "Judaism, Christianity, and Islam each has a special claim on Abraham"
in Abraham's bosom
No longer living. Dead
Albert Abraham Michelson
born Dec. 19, 1852, Strelno, Prussia died May 9, 1931, Pasadena, Calif., U.S. Prussian-born U.S. physicist. His family immigrated to the U.S. in 1854. He studied at the U.S. Naval Academy and in Europe and later taught principally at the University of Chicago (1892-1931), where he headed the physics department. He invented the interferometer, with which he used light to make extremely precise measurements. He is best remembered for the Michelson-Morley experiment, undertaken with Edward W. Morley (1838-1923), which established that the speed of light is a fundamental constant. Using a more refined interferometer, Michelson measured the diameter of the star Betelgeuse, the first substantially accurate determination of the size of a star. In 1907 he became the first American scientist to receive a Nobel Prize
Jacob-Abraham- Camille Pissarro
born July 10, 1830, St. Thomas, Danish West Indies died Nov. 13, 1903, Paris, France West Indian-born French painter. The son of a prosperous Jewish merchant, he moved to Paris in 1855. His earliest canvases are broadly painted figure paintings and landscapes; these show the careful observation of nature that was to remain a characteristic of his art. In 1871 he took a house in Pontoise, in the countryside outside Paris. These surroundings formed the theme of his art for some 30 years. Pissarro's leading motifs during the 1870s and 1880s were houses, factories, trees, haystacks, fields, labouring peasants, and river scenes. In these works, forms do not dissolve but remain firm, and colours are strong; during the latter part of the 1870s his comma-like brushstrokes frequently recorded the sparkling scintillation of light. These works were admired by the Impressionist artists; Pissarro was the only Impressionist painter who participated in all eight of the group's exhibitions. Despite acute eye trouble, his later years were his most prolific
Karl Abraham
born May 3, 1877, Bremen, Ger. died Dec. 25, 1925, Berlin German psychoanalyst. He helped establish the first branch of the International Psychoanalytic Institute in 1910 and pioneered the psychoanalytic treatment of manic-depressive psychosis (bipolar disorder). He suggested that the sexual drive develops in six stages and that if development is arrested at any of the earlier stages, mental disorders will likely result from fixation at that level. His most important work was A Short Study of the Development of the Libido (1924)
Paul -Abraham Dukas
born Oct. 1, 1865, Paris, France died May 17, 1935, Paris French composer. Born into a musical family, he studied at the Paris Conservatoire. His first success was the overture Polyeucte (1892). Perfectionism led him to destroy much of his work. His fame rests almost entirely on the tone poem The Sorceror's Apprentice (1897); his other surviving works include the opera Ariane et Barbe-Bleue (1906), the ballet La Péri (1912), and a symphony (1896)
Plains of Abraham
Plateau located southwest of the old walled city of Quebec, Canada. On September 13, 1759, it was the scene of the decisive battle of the French and Indian War, in which the British under James Wolfe defeated the French under the Marquis de Montcalm. U.S. forces held the plateau (1775-76) in their siege of Quebec during the American Revolution. It is now a park within Quebec city limits
Professor Abraham Van Helsing
a vampire hunter who hunts down Dracula in the novel by Bram Stoker
Selman Abraham Waksman
born July 22, 1888, Priluka, Ukraine, Russian Empire died Aug. 16, 1973, Hyannis, Mass., U.S. Ukrainian-born U.S. biochemist. He became a U.S. citizen in 1916 and spent most of his career at Rutgers University. After the discovery of penicillin, he played a major role in initiating a calculated, systematic search for antibiotics (a term he coined in 1941) among microorganisms. His 1943 discovery of streptomycin, the first specific agent effective in the treatment of tuberculosis, brought him a 1952 Nobel Prize. Waksman also isolated and developed several other antibiotics, including neomycin, that have been used in treating many infectious diseases of humans, domestic animals, and plants
Sir George Abraham Grierson
born Jan. 7, 1851, County Dublin, Ire. died March 9, 1941, Camberley, Surrey, Eng. Anglo-Irish civil servant and linguist. While holding a succession of British government posts in Bengal (1873-98), Grierson carried out pioneering research on South Asian, particularly Indo-Aryan, languages. In 1898 he began work on the 19-volume Linguistic Survey of India and spent the next 30 years publishing data on hundreds of languages and dialects. His work was of enormous value; nevertheless, his hypothetical linguistic constructs such as "Rajasthani," "Bihari," and "Lahnda" misled most nonspecialists
Vidkun Abraham Lauritz Jonsson Quisling
born July 18, 1887, Fyresdal, Nor. died Oct. 24, 1945, Akershus Fortress, Oslo Norwegian politician and collaborator with the Germans in World War II. After serving as military attaché in Petrograd and Helsinki, he became Norway's minister of defense in 1931. He resigned in 1933 to form the fascist National Union party. He actively collaborated in the German conquest of Norway (1940) and served in the occupation government. His attempts to convert Norwegians to National Socialism aroused strong opposition. After Norway's liberation, he was found guilty of treason and executed. His name became a synonym for "traitor
descendants of Abraham
people who are offspring from Abraham, member of the Israelite people
in Abraham's bosom
against Abraham's chest (Biblical)
seed of Abraham
descendants of Abraham
abraham

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    A·bra·ham

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    eybrıhäm

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    /ˈābrəˌham/ /ˈeɪbrəˌhæm/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'A-br&-"ham ] (noun.) From Late Latin Abraham Ancient Greek Ἀβραάμ (Abraam) Hebrew אַבְרָהָם (ʾAḇrāhām). Glossed as אָב (av = 'father') + המון (hamon = 'multitude') "father of a multitude (of nations)" in Genesis; or from Hebrew אַבְרָם, 'exalted father' or ' father is exalted', from אָב (av = 'father') + רָם (ram = 'high', 'lofty').

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