williams

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William
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An English and Welsh patronymic surname derived from the given name William
Irish peace activist. She shared the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize for work in Northern Ireland's peace movement. Trinidadian politician and intellectual who led his country to independence from Britain and became its first prime minister (1962-1981). A noted historian, his works include the classic Capitalism and Slavery (1944). American singer and songwriter who was influential in the development of country and western music. His many hit songs include "Your Cheatin' Heart" and "Hey, Good Lookin'.". American composer and conductor best known for his film scores, including Jaws (1975) and Star Wars (1977). English cleric in America. After being expelled from Massachusetts for his criticism of Puritanism, he founded Providence (1636), a community based on religious freedom and democratic ideals, and obtained a royal charter for Rhode Island in 1663. American playwright whose works often concern family tensions and sexual anxiety. They include A Streetcar Named Desire (1947) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955), each of which won the Pulitzer Prize. American baseball player. Among the best hitters in the history of the game, he accrued 521 home runs and a.344 batting average as left fielder for the Boston Red Sox (1939-1960). American poet whose verse is marked by a lucid, spare style and vivid observations of the everyday. His works include Collected Poems (1934) and Paterson (1946-1958). Cushing Harvey Williams Keen William Williams Myrna Williams Vaughan Williams Ralph Williams College Williams Daniel Hale Williams George Emlyn Williams Eric Eustace Williams Hank Hiram King Williams Williams Joe Williams John Towner Williams Mary Lou Williams Roger Williams Ted Theodore Samuel Williams Williams Tennessee Thomas Lanier Williams Williams William Carlos Williams Jody Williams Venus and Serena
{i} family name; male first name; Robin Williams (born 1952), comedian and actor; Roger Williams (1603-1683), founder of Rhode Island; Elizabeth "Betty" Williams (born 1943), Irish peace Activist; Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) American playwright; Venus Williams (born 1980), female tennis athlete, winner of U.S. Open in 2000 and 2001; Serena Williams (born 1981) female tennis athlete, winner of the 1999 U.S. Open
United States playwright (1911-1983)
English philosopher credited with reviving the field of moral philosophy (1929-2003)
United States poet (1883-1963)
United States baseball player noted as a hitter (1918-2002)
United States playwright (1911-1983) English clergyman and colonist who was expelled from Massachusetts for criticizing Puritanism; he founded Providence in 1636 and obtained a royal charter for Rhode Island in 1663 (1603-1683) United States baseball player noted as a hitter (1918-2002) United States poet (1883-1963) English philosopher credited with reviving the field of moral philosophy (1929-2003) United States country singer and songwriter (1923-1953)
English clergyman and colonist who was expelled from Massachusetts for criticizing Puritanism; he founded Providence in 1636 and obtained a royal charter for Rhode Island in 1663 (1603-1683)
United States country singer and songwriter (1923-1953)
recusant
dingy
Williams College
Private liberal arts college in Williamstown, Mass. Established in 1793 and affiliated with the Congregational church, it has since become nondenominational. Williams has consistently rated as one of the best colleges in the U.S., offering bachelor's and master's degree programs in fine and applied arts and sciences. Campus facilities include notable collections of American, contemporary, and South Asian art and materials relating to U.S. history. Notable alumni include director Elia Kazan
williams syndrome
a rare congenital disorder associated with deletion of genetic material in chromosome 7; characterized by mental deficiency and some growth deficiency and elfin faces but an overly social personality and a remarkable gift for vocabulary
William Carlos Williams
a US poet and medical doctor who wrote mainly about ordinary life. His best known poems include Paterson. He also wrote plays and essays, and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1963 for Pictures from Breughel (1883-1963). born Sept. 17, 1883, Rutherford, N.J., U.S. died March 4, 1963, Rutherford U.S. poet. Trained as a pediatrician, Williams wrote poetry and practiced medicine in his hometown. He is noted for making the ordinary appear extraordinary through clear and discrete imagery, as in the fresh and direct impressions of the sensuous world expressed in "The Red Wheelbarrow," from Spring and All (1923). Paterson (1946-58), a five-part long poem, evokes a complex vision of modern American life. In 1963 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in poetry for Pictures from Brueghel (1962). His numerous prose works include essays, a trilogy of novels, short stories, drama, and autobiography
William Williams Keen
born Jan. 19, 1837, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S. died June 7, 1932, Philadelphia First U.S. brain surgeon. He received his M.D. from Jefferson Medical College. He was one of the first to successfully remove a brain tumour (1888) and assisted in the removal of Pres. Grover Cleveland's left upper jaw (1893), which contained a malignant tumour. In addition to his teaching and medical work, he edited Surgery: Its Principles and Practice (8 vol., 1906-13)
William
A male given name popular since the Norman Conquest

By the same token I should probably have called myself 'Bill'. With a name like William you have choices. Very handy for us chameleons. 'William' is stern and dignified. A little austere and unapproachable. He conquers things. It is what my mother calls me when she is angry with me.

sweet williams
plural form of sweet william
William
{i} name of a number of English kings; male first name
Daniel Hale Williams
born Jan. 18, 1858, Hollidaysburg, Pa., U.S. died Aug. 4, 1931, Idlewild, Mich. U.S. surgeon. He graduated from Chicago Medical College. In 1891 he founded Provident Hospital in Chicago, the first interracial hospital in the U.S., to provide training for black interns and nurses. There in 1893 he performed the first successful heart surgery; the patient lived at least 20 years after Williams opened the thoracic cavity, sutured a wound of the pericardium (the sac around the heart), and closed the chest. In 1913 he became the only black charter member of the American College of Surgeons
Earl Williams
{i} American basketball player who played for Maccabi Tel Aviv (Israeli basketball team)
Edward Williams Morley
{i} Edward Morley (1838-1923), U.S. chemist who researched the relative motion of the Earth
Elizabeth Williams
{i} Elizabeth "Betty" Williams (born 1943), Irish peace activist who shared the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize
Emlyn Williams
born Nov. 26, 1905, Mostyn, Flintshire, Wales died Sept. 25, 1987, London Welsh actor and playwright. He made his acting debut in 1927 and won acclaim in London and New York City for his performance in his own play, the macabre Night Must Fall (1935; film, 1964). His most popular play was the autobiographical The Corn Is Green (1938; film, 1945), the story of a boy and his teacher in a Welsh mining town. He also acted in many films and was renowned for his public readings from Charles Dickens, Saki, and Dylan Thomas
Eric Eustace Williams
born Sept. 25, 1911, Port of Spain, Trin. died March 29, 1981, St. Anne, near Port of Spain First prime minister of independent Trinidad and Tobago (1962-81). He received a doctorate from the University of Oxford and served on the faculty of Howard University in the U.S. before founding the People's National Movement (PNM) in 1956 and taking his nation into the Federation of the West Indies in 1958 only to withdraw in favour of independence in 1962. Oil reserves helped boost the nation's income, and Williams remained popular until 1970, when an economic downturn led to unsuccessful revolts. He served as prime minister until his death. Capitalism and Slavery (1944) and From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean, 1492-1969 (1970) were among his many books
Eric Williams
born Sept. 25, 1911, Port of Spain, Trin. died March 29, 1981, St. Anne, near Port of Spain First prime minister of independent Trinidad and Tobago (1962-81). He received a doctorate from the University of Oxford and served on the faculty of Howard University in the U.S. before founding the People's National Movement (PNM) in 1956 and taking his nation into the Federation of the West Indies in 1958 only to withdraw in favour of independence in 1962. Oil reserves helped boost the nation's income, and Williams remained popular until 1970, when an economic downturn led to unsuccessful revolts. He served as prime minister until his death. Capitalism and Slavery (1944) and From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean, 1492-1969 (1970) were among his many books
George Emlyn Williams
born Nov. 26, 1905, Mostyn, Flintshire, Wales died Sept. 25, 1987, London Welsh actor and playwright. He made his acting debut in 1927 and won acclaim in London and New York City for his performance in his own play, the macabre Night Must Fall (1935; film, 1964). His most popular play was the autobiographical The Corn Is Green (1938; film, 1945), the story of a boy and his teacher in a Welsh mining town. He also acted in many films and was renowned for his public readings from Charles Dickens, Saki, and Dylan Thomas
Hank Williams
a US country and western singer and songwriter, who greatly influenced the development of country and western music, and whose songs include Your Cheatin' Heart and I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry (1923-53). orig. Hiram King Williams born Sept. 17, 1923, Georgiana, Ala., U.S. died Jan. 1, 1953, Oak Hill, W.Va. U.S. singer and guitarist. Williams was born into poverty. He began playing guitar at age 8, made his radio debut at 13, and formed his first band, Hank Williams and his Drifting Cowboys, at
Hank Williams
With the help of Fred Rose, his "Lovesick Blues" became a smash hit in 1949, and he joined the Grand Ole Opry that year after an extraordinary debut appearance. Among his best-selling recordings were "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," "Jambalaya," "Your Cheatin' Heart," and "Hey, Good Lookin'." He wrote almost all the songs he recorded. His death from heart failure at 29 may have resulted from drug and alcohol abuse. He remains perhaps the most revered figure in the history of country music. His son, Hank Williams, Jr., has had an exceptional recording career, and grandson Hank Williams III is also a musician
Harvey Williams Cushing
born April 8, 1869, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. died Oct. 7, 1939, New Haven, Conn. U.S. surgeon. He taught principally at Harvard University and became known as the leading neurosurgeon of the early 20th century, developing many procedures and techniques still basic to brain surgery and greatly reducing its mortality rate. The leading expert in the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial tumours, he was also the first to ascribe to pituitary gland malfunction what is now known as Cushing syndrome. He wrote numerous scientific works, including The Life of Sir William Osler (1925, Pulitzer Prize)
Jody Williams
born Oct. 9, 1950, Putney, Vt., U.S. American activist who in 1992 helped found the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL). In 1997 she and the ICBL were named corecipients of the Nobel Prize for Peace. She coordinated the launch of the ICBL with the cooperation of six international organizations, with the mission to abolish the use of antipersonnel land mines, of which tens of millions lay unexploded in more than 70 countries. Her efforts bore fruit in December 1997, when the Mine Ban Treaty was signed by more than 100 countries in Ottawa. By 2003 some 130 nations had ratified the treaty, but not the major mine-producing ones, such as the United States, Russia, and China. Williams was coauthor, with Shawn Roberts, of After the Guns Fall Silent: The Enduring Legacy of Landmines (1995)
Joe Williams
orig. Joseph Goreed born Dec. 12, 1918, Cordele, Ga., U.S. died March 29, 1999, Las Vegas, Nev. U.S. singer and actor. Williams worked with Coleman Hawkins and Lionel Hampton before joining Count Basie's band in 1954. The success of "Every Day I Have the Blues" established Williams as a sophisticated blues singer with a powerful bass-baritone voice. After leaving the Basie band in 1961, Williams led small ensembles singing popular songs, ballads, and blues. During the 1980s he played the role of Grandpa Al on the television series The Cosby Show. His album Nothin' but the Blues (1984) won a Grammy Award
John Towner Williams
born Feb. 8, 1932, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. composer and conductor. Williams studied music at UCLA and Juilliard. He began his career as a jazz pianist but began to compose for TV and film in the 1960s. He has scored over 75 films, including Jaws (1975), the Star Wars trilogy, Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), E.T. (1982), Schindler's List (1993), and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001), and has won five Academy Awards. He has also written many concert works. From 1980 to 1993 he was conductor of the Boston Pops
John Williams
born Feb. 8, 1932, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. composer and conductor. Williams studied music at UCLA and Juilliard. He began his career as a jazz pianist but began to compose for TV and film in the 1960s. He has scored over 75 films, including Jaws (1975), the Star Wars trilogy, Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), E.T. (1982), Schindler's List (1993), and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001), and has won five Academy Awards. He has also written many concert works. From 1980 to 1993 he was conductor of the Boston Pops
Mary Lou Williams
orig. Mary Elfrieda Scruggs born May 8, 1910, Atlanta, Ga., U.S. died May 28, 1981, Durham, N.C. U.S. pianist, composer, arranger, and bandleader. A child prodigy, she had her professional debut with big bands at age
Mary Lou Williams
Beginning in 1929, Williams wrote arrangements for many swing bands, including those of Andy Kirk (1898-1992) and Duke Ellington. Her 12-movement Zodiac Suite was performed by the New York Philharmonic in 1946. A pianist with strong roots in the blues and early jazz, Williams embraced the innovations of bebop and later free jazz, performing with a diverse array of jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie and Cecil Taylor (b. 1933). In the 1960s and '70s she composed a number of liturgical pieces for jazz ensembles, including Music for Peace (1970), popularly known as "Mary Lou's Mass
Ralph Vaughan Williams
a British composer who collected English folk music and used it in his work. He is best known for his Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, his violin music The Lark Ascending, and his symphonies (1872-1958). Vaughan Williams, Ralph. v. born Oct. 12, 1872, Down Ampney, Gloucestershire, Eng. died Aug. 26, 1958, London British composer. He attended the Royal College of Music and Cambridge University, and he also studied in Berlin with the composer Max Bruch. Having collected English folk songs for his academic work, he combined folk melody with modern approaches to harmony and rhythm, forging a musical style at once highly personal and deeply English. His nine symphonies, including Sea Symphony (1909), London Symphony (1913), and Sinfonia Antarctica (1952), were his most exploratory works. Other popular pieces include The Lark Ascending (1914) and Serenade to Music (1938); he also wrote five operas, including Riders to the Sea (1936). He conducted extensively throughout his life, and he edited The English Hymnal (1904-06)
Robbie Williams
{i} (born 1974) British singer and songwriter
Robin Williams
(born 1952) famous American comedian and movie actor
Roger Williams
{i} (1603-1683) founder of Rhode Island
Roger Williams
born 1603?, London, Eng. died Jan. 27/March 15, 1683, Providence, R.I. English clergyman, colonist, and founder of Rhode Island. He arrived in Boston in 1631 and became pastor of the separatist Plymouth colony (1632-33). Banned from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for his beliefs, including his support for religious toleration and the rights of Indians and his opposition to civil authority, he founded the colony of Rhode Island and the town of Providence (1636) on land purchased from the Narragansett Indians. The colony established a democratic government and instituted separation of church and state, and it became a haven for Quakers and others seeking religious liberty. He obtained a charter for the colony (1643) and served as its first president, maintaining friendly relations with the Indians and acting as peacemaker for nearby colonies
Serena Williams
{i} (born 1981) female tennis athlete, winner of the 1999 U.S. Open
Ted Williams
He became an outfielder with the Boston Red Sox in 1939 and remained with the team until his retirement in 1960. Tall and thin, he was dubbed "the Splendid Splinter" but was also known more simply as "the Kid." A left-handed hitter, he compiled a lifetime batting average of .344, the eighth highest on record. He batted .406 in 1941, becoming the last .400 hitter of the century. His career slugging percentage (.634) is second only to that of Babe Ruth. Williams is the only player besides Rogers Hornsby to have twice won the batting Triple Crown (best average, most home runs, and most runs batted in in the same season). Despite losing five years of his career to service as a flyer in World War II and the Korean War, he hit a total of 521 home runs, capping his career with a home run in his final at bat. After retiring as a player, he managed the Washington Senators (1969-72) and became an accomplished fisherman
Ted Williams
orig. Theodore Samuel Williams born Aug. 30, 1918, San Diego, Calif., U.S. died July 5, 2002, Inverness, Fla. U.S. baseball player, one of the greatest hitters of all time. Williams began playing professionally at age
Tennessee Williams
After attending several colleges he graduated from the University of Iowa (1938). He first won recognition for his group of one-act plays American Blues (1939). Wider success came with The Glass Menagerie (1944) and mounted with A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, Pulitzer Prize; film, 1951), Camino Real (1953), and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955, Pulitzer Prize; film, 1958). His plays, which also include Suddenly Last Summer (1958; film, 1959) and The Night of the Iguana (1961; film, 1964), describe a world of repressed sexuality and violence thinly veiled by gentility. He also wrote the novel The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1950; film, 1961) and the screenplays for The Rose Tattoo (1955, adapted from his 1951 play) and Baby Doll (1956). A clear-sighted chronicler of fragile illusions, he is regarded as one of the greatest American playwrights
Tennessee Williams
{i} (1911-1983, born Thomas Lanier Williams) 20th century United States author playwright and poet
Tennessee Williams
a US writer whose plays are mainly about the emotional problems of people living in the South of the US. His plays include A Streetcar Named Desire, The Glass Menagerie, and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1911-83). orig. Thomas Lanier Williams born March 26, 1911, Columbus, Miss., U.S. died Feb. 25, 1983, New York, N.Y. U.S. playwright. The son of a traveling salesman and a clergyman's daughter, he lived in St. Louis from age
Thomas Lanier Williams
{i} Tennessee Williams (1911-1983), 20th century United States author playwright and poet
Vaughan Williams
British composer who was influenced by folk tunes and Tudor music. His works include nine symphonies, the ballet Job (1930), and the opera The Pilgrim's Progress (1951)
Venus Williams
{i} (born 1980) female tennis athlete, winner of U.S. Open in 2000 and 2001
Venus and Serena Williams
born June 17, 1980, Lynwood, Cal., U.S. born Sept. 26, 1981, Saginaw, Mich. U.S. tennis players. The sisters were introduced to the sport by their father, who early on recognized their talent. Venus turned professional in 1994, and Serena followed suit a year later. Possessing powerful groundstrokes and superb athleticism, the sisters were soon dominating women's professional tennis. Serena won the U.S. Open in 1999. Venus won Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in 2000 and 2001. In 2002 Serena won the French and U.S. opens and Wimbledon, defeating Venus in the finals of each tournament
William
or William Rufus born 1056 died Aug. 2, 1100, near Lyndhurst, Hampshire, Eng. King of England (1087-1100) and de facto duke of Normandy (1096-1100). He inherited England from his father, William I (the Conqueror), and quelled a rebellion (1088) by barons loyal to his brother Robert II. A tyrannical ruler, he brutally punished the leaders of a second revolt (1095). He forced St. Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, to leave England and seized his lands (1097). He reduced the Scottish kings to vassals (1093), subjugated Wales (1097), and waged war on Normandy (1089-96), gaining control when Robert mortgaged the duchy. His death in a hunting accident may have been an assassination ordered by his brother Henry (later Henry I). Dutch Willem Frederik born Aug. 24, 1772, The Hague, United Provinces of the Netherlands died Dec. 12, 1843, Berlin, Prussia King of The Netherlands and grand duke of Luxembourg (1815-40). Son of William V, prince of Orange, he married in 1791 and immigrated with his family to England after the French invasion of the Dutch Republic (1795). He sided with Prussia against Napoleon and lived in exile at the Prussian court until 1812. After the Dutch revolt against French rule, he became sovereign prince of the Dutch Republic (1813) and king of the United Netherlands (1815), which included Belgium, Liège, and Luxembourg. He led an economic recovery program that sparked a commercial revival, but his autocratic methods and imposition of Dutch as the official language provoked a revolt by Belgium (1830) that led to its independence. In 1840 he abdicated in favour of his son, William II. known as William the Lion born 1143 died Dec. 2, 1214, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scot. King of Scotland (1165-1214). He succeeded his father as earl of Northumberland (1152) but was forced to relinquish his earldom to England's Henry II in 1157. He succeeded his brother, Malcolm IV, as king of Scotland and in 1173 joined a revolt of Henry's sons in an attempt to regain Northumberland. Captured in 1174, he was released after submitting to Henry's overlordship. He bought his release from subjection in 1189. He continued to agitate for the restoration of Northumberland but was forced to renounce his claim by King John in 1209. William created many of the major burghs of modern Scotland. known as William the Conqueror born 1028, Falaise, Normandy died Sept. 9, 1087, Rouen Duke of Normandy (1035-87) and king of England (1066-87). Though born out of wedlock, he succeeded his father as duke of Normandy, subduing rebellions and becoming the mightiest noble in France. In 1051 Edward the Confessor promised to make him heir to the English throne, but on Edward's death in 1066, Harold Godwineson, earl of Wessex (Harold II), was accepted as king. Determined to assert his right to the throne, William sailed from Normandy with an invasion force, defeated Harold at the Battle of Hastings, and was crowned king. The Norman Conquest was thus completed, though English rebellions continued until 1071. To secure England's frontiers, William invaded Scotland (1072) and Wales (1081). In 1086 he ordered the survey summarized in the Domesday Book. He divided his lands between his sons, giving Normandy and Maine to Robert II and England to William II. Dutch Willem known as William the Silent born April 24, 1533, Dillenburg, Nassau died July 10, 1584, Delft, Holland First stadtholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands (1572-84). Son of William, count of Nassau-Dillenburg, he inherited the principality of Orange and other vast estates from his cousin in 1544. He was educated at the Habsburg imperial court in Brussels, then appointed by Philip II to the council of state (1555). He helped negotiate the Treaty of Cateau-Cambrésis, earning his byname for keeping silent about secret policy decisions, and was named stadtholder (governor) in Holland, Zeeland, and Utrecht in 1559. Increasingly opposed to Philip's strict ordinances against Protestants, he led a revolt in 1568 that proved unsuccessful, but in 1572 he succeeded in uniting the northern provinces. He was proclaimed their stadtholder, and his position was solidified by the Pacification of Ghent (1576). He sought help from France in the revolt against Spain, and in 1579 he was outlawed by Philip. A reward was offered for his assassination, and in 1584 he was shot by a fanatical Catholic. Huddie William Ledbetter Aberhart William George William Russell Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen Amis Sir Kingsley William Ashley William Henry Ashton Sir Frederick William Mallandaine Barkley Alben William Bartram William William Allen Basie Bateson William Bayliss Sir William Maddock Beaumont William Beckford William Becknell William Bentinck William Henry Cavendish Lord Benton William Burnett William Berkeley Enos Berkeley Sir William Beveridge of Tuggal William Henry 1st Baron Billings William Bishop William Avery Blackstone Sir William Blair Henry William Blake William Bligh William Bliss William Dwight Porter Blount William Bok Edward William Booth William Borah William Edgar Borden Sir Frederick William Bouguereau William Adolphe Bowman Sir William Bradford William William Warren Bradley Bragg Sir William Henry Brennan William Joseph Jr. Brewster William Bricker John William Brown William Wells Bryan William Jennings Paul William Bryant Bryant William Cullen Buckley William Frank Jr. Burroughs William Seward Byrd William Cadogan William 1st Earl John William Carson Caxton William Cecil William 1st Baron Burghley Chambers Robert and William Channing William Ellery Chase William Merritt Cheselden William Cheyne Sir William Watson Claiborne William Clarendon George William Frederick Villiers 4th earl of Clark William Clemens William Roger Cobbett William Coddington William Cody William Frederick Collins William Wilkie Coltrane John William Congreve William Charles William Gordon Coolidge William David Corman Roger William Cosgrave William Thomas Cowper William Crawford William Harris Cullen William Currie Sir Arthur William D'Arcy William Knox Dampier William Davenant Sir William William D'Avenant Davies William Robertson Deming William Edwards William Harrison Dempsey William James Dixon Dodge William Earl Douglas William Orville Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Dunbar William Durant William James and Ariel Durant William Crapo Eccles William Henry William Clarence Eckstein William Blake McEdwards Elgar Sir Edward William Eliot Charles William Empson Sir William Estes William Kaye William John Evans Evarts William Maxwell Ewing William Maurice Fairbairn Sir William Faulkner William Cuthbert William Cuthbert Falkner Robert William Andrew Feller Fessenden William Pitt William Claude Dukenfield Foster William Zebulon Fowler William Alfred Frederick William Frederick William I Frederick William II Frederick William III Frederick William IV William Orville Frizzell Froude William Fulbright James William Gable William Clark Gaddis William Thomas Garrison William Lloyd William Henry Gates III George William Frederick Prince William of Denmark Gibbs William Francis Gibson William Ford Gilbert Sir William Schwenck Giuliani Rudolph William Glackens William James Gladstone William Ewart Godwin William Golding Sir William Gerald Goodpasture Ernest William Gorgas William Crawford Grace William Gilbert Green William Gull Sir William Withey Gunn Thomson William Guthrie Sir William Tyrone William John Clifton Haley Sir William John Halsey William Frederick Jr. Halsted William Stewart Handy William Christopher Hanna William Denby and Barbera Joseph Roland Hardee William Joseph Harnett William Michael Harriman William Averell Harrison William Henry Hart William S. William John Hartack Harvey William Hawking Stephen William Haywood William Dudley Hazlitt William Hearst William Randolph Heisman John William Henley William Ernest William Sydney Porter William Benjamin Hogan Hogarth William Holley Robert William William Frederick Hoppe Howe William Howe 5th Viscount Howells William Dean Hull William Hunt William Holman Hunter William Inge William Motter Christopher William Bradshaw Jackson William Henry James William Johnson Sir William 1st Baronet William Tass Jones Jones Sir William William Henry Pratt Keen William Williams Kelly William Kelvin of Largs William Thomson Baron Kennedy William Kidd William King William's War King William Lyon Mackenzie King William Rufus de Vane Knudsen William Signius Kunstler William Moses Labov William Lanchester Frederick William Langland William Laud William Lawes Henry and William Leahy William Daniel Lear William Powell Lee William Lily William Livingston William Mackenzie William Lyon Macready William Charles Mahone William Maitland Frederic William Maitland of Lethington William Mansfield William Murray 1st earl of Marcy William Learned Masters William Howell and Johnson Virginia Eshelman Mauchly John William Maugham William Somerset Maxwell William McAdoo William Gibbs McGuffey William Holmes McKinley William Melbourne of Kilmore William Lamb 2nd Viscount Mellon Andrew William Merwin William Stanley William Mervin Mills William Mitchell William Smith Monroe Morris William William Joseph Mosconi Moultrie William Mount William Sidney William Francis Murphy Joseph William Namath Newcastle upon Tyne William Cavendish 1st duke of Nicklaus Jack William Nimitz Chester William Norris George William O'Brien William Smith Ockham William of William of Occam Osler Sir William Paley William Samuel Paterson William Penn William Petrie Sir William Matthew Flinders Petty Sir William Pitt William the Elder Pitt William the Younger Post Charles William Powell William Prescott William Hickling Prince William Sound Procter William Cooper Prynne William Quantrill William Clarke Rankine William John Macquorn Rayleigh of Terling Place John William Strutt 3rd Baron Rehnquist William Hubbs Ella Gwendolen Rees William William Robinson Rogers William Penn Adair Rosecrans William Starke Ross Sir William David Rosse William Parsons 3rd earl of Russell Bertrand Arthur William 3rd Earl Russell William Felton Russell Russell William Russell Lord Safire William Salesbury William Sampson William Thomas Saroyan William Schuman William Howard Service Robert William Seward William Henry Shakespeare William Sherman William Tecumseh Shippen William Jr. Shirer William Lawrence Shirley William Shockley William Bradford William Lee Shoemaker Siemens Sir Charles William Sims William Sowden Smith William Eugene Smith William Stahl Franklin William Steuben Frederick William Augustus Baron von Stiegel Henry William Still William Grant Stirling William Alexander 1st earl of Stokes William William Thomas Strayhorn Strong William Styron William William Ashley Sunday sweet William Symington William Stuart Symington William Symons Arthur William Taft William Howard Talbot William Henry Fox Tedder of Glenguin Arthur William Tedder 1st Baron Tell William Temple Sir William Thackeray William Makepeace William Tatem Tilden Trevor William William Trevor Cox Trimble William David Tubman William Vacanarat Shadrach William Cook Turner Joseph Mallord William Tweed William Marcy Robert William Unser William Louis Veeck Walker William Wallace William Sir Wallack James William Walton Sir William Turner Warner William Lloyd Welch William Henry Wellman William Augustus Whewell William White William Allen Whitney William Collins Wilberforce William William and Mary College of William II William Rufus William the Good William III William IV William I William the Lion William the Conqueror William the Silent William of Auvergne William of Auxerre Williams William Carlos Wilson William Julius Wordsworth William Wycherley William Wyler William Yancey William Lowndes William Caleb Yarborough Yeats William Butler William Alexander Abbott William Maxwell Aitken Bulwer Sir William Henry Lytton Earle William Jefferson Blythe IV William Jefferson Clinton Northcliffe of Saint Peter Alfred Charles William Harmsworth Viscount Slim William Joseph 1st Viscount Slim of Yarralumla and Bishopston Wallace William Roy DeWitt and Lila Acheson. German Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albert known as Kaiser Wilhelm born Jan. 27, 1859, Potsdam, near Berlin, Prussia died June 4, 1941, Doorn, Neth. German emperor (kaiser) and king of Prussia (1888-1918). Son of the future Frederick III and grandson of Britain's Queen Victoria, William succeeded his father to the throne in 1888. Two years later, he forced the resignation of Otto von Bismarck. He was characterized by his frequently militaristic manner and by his vacillating policies that undermined those of his chancellors, including Leo, count von Caprivi, and Bernhard, prince von Bülow. From 1897 he encouraged Adm. Alfred von Tirpitz to strengthen the German fleet and challenged France's position in Morocco (see Moroccan crises). He sided with Austria-Hungary in the crisis with Serbia (1914), and in World War I he encouraged the grandiose war aims of the generals and politicians. After Germany's defeat, he fled to The Netherlands, ending the monarchy in Germany, and lived in exile until his death. Dutch Willem Frederik George Lodewijk born Dec. 6, 1792, The Hague, United Provinces of the Netherlands died March 17, 1849, Tilburg, Neth. King of The Netherlands and grand duke of Luxembourg (1840-49). Son of William I, he lived in exile with his family in England from 1795. He commanded Dutch troops in the Battle of Waterloo (1815). Sent by his father to Belgium in 1830 to appease the rebels, he failed to stop the independence movement. In 1840 he became king of The Netherlands on his father's abdication. As king, he helped stabilize the economy. In 1848 he oversaw passage of a new liberal constitution that expanded the authority of the ministers and assembly, established direct elections, and secured basic civil liberties. Dutch Willem born May 27, 1626, The Hague, United Provinces of the Netherlands died Nov. 6, 1650, The Hague Prince of Orange, count of Nassau, and stadtholder of the Netherlands (1647-50). The son of Frederick Henry, prince of Orange, he married Mary Stuart, eldest daughter of Charles I of England, in 1641 and later succeeded to his father's offices (1647), which included the stadtholdership of all the provinces of the Netherlands except Friesland. Despite the treaty with Spain in 1648 that recognized the independence of the United Provinces, he planned to conquer part of the Spanish Netherlands (modern Belgium). He imprisoned members of the assembly of Holland who opposed his war policy but died of smallpox before his influence could be tested. Italian Guglielmo known as William the Good born 1154 died Nov. 18, 1189, Palermo, Kingdom of Sicily Last Norman king of Sicily (1166-89). His mother served as regent until 1171, after which he ruled alone, winning a reputation for clemency and justice. His friendship with Manuel I Comnenus ended when the Byzantine emperor thwarted William's proposed marriage to his daughter. Turning against the Byzantines, William allied with Frederick I Barbarossa. He agreed to his aunt's marriage to Frederick's son Henry (later Henry VI), giving Henry a claim to Sicily. He attacked the Byzantines (1185) with early success but was defeated within sight of Constantinople. Dutch Willem Hendrik born Nov. 14, 1650, The Hague, United Provinces of the Netherlands died March 19, 1702, London, Eng. Stadtholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands (1672-1702) and king of England (1689-1702). Son of William II, prince of Orange, and Mary Stuart, daughter of Charles I of England, he was born in The Hague soon after his father's death. The Act of Seclusion (1654) that barred the house of Orange from power in the United Provinces was rescinded in 1660, and William was appointed captain general and named stadtholder by popular acclaim in 1672. He successfully defended his country against Charles II of England and Louis XIV of France. In 1677 he married Mary (later Queen Mary II), daughter of the English duke of York (later James II). In 1688 William was invited by James's opponents to intervene against the Catholic ruler, and he landed with a Dutch army in Devon, Eng. He and Mary were proclaimed joint rulers of England in 1689; he ruled alone after Mary's death in 1694. He directed the European opposition to Louis XIV, which eventually led to the War of the Grand Alliance after William's death. In Britain he secured religious toleration and strengthened Parliament, granting independence to the judiciary in the Act of Settlement. Dutch Willem Alexander Paul Frederik Lodewijk born Feb. 19, 1817, Brussels, Belg. died Nov. 23, 1890, Apeldoorn, Neth. King of The Netherlands and grand duke of Luxembourg (1849-90). Son of William II, he succeeded to the throne on his father's death in 1849. Opposed to the liberal constitution of 1848, he adopted an anti-Catholic posture and from 1862 to 1868 was able to rule through the cabinet. He tried to sell his sovereignty over Luxembourg to France (1867) but yielded to Prussia's demand that the area be independent. Following this crisis, his influence over parliament declined. On his death, he was succeeded by his daughter, Wilhelmina. born Aug. 21, 1765, London, Eng. died June 20, 1837, Windsor Castle, near London King of Great Britain and Ireland and of Hanover (1830-37). The son of George III, he entered the royal navy at age 13, fought in the American Revolution, and served in the West Indies, leaving the navy as a rear admiral in 1790 (he was later called "the Sailor King"). He angered his father by his numerous love affairs and fathered 10 illegitimate children by the actress Dorothea Jordan (1761-1816). In 1830 he succeeded his brother George IV as king. Opposed to parliamentary reform, William delayed consideration of the Reform Bill of 1832, but his prime minister, Earl Grey, persuaded him to promise to create enough peers in the House of Lords to carry it, forcing its passage. On William's death, the British crown passed to his niece, Victoria, and the Hanoverian crown to his brother Ernest Augustus, duke of Cumberland (1771-1851). German Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig born March 22, 1797, Berlin died March 9, 1888, Berlin King of Prussia (1861-88) and German emperor (1871-88). Son of Frederick William III of Prussia, he fought in the war against Napoleon (1814) and thereafter devoted himself to the Prussian army and military affairs. He advocated the use of force against the rebels in 1848. The military governor of Rhineland province from 1849, he succeeded his brother on the Prussian throne in 1861. A conservative and a supporter of military reform, William insisted on a three-year term of military conscription, which the liberal lower chamber rejected in 1862. William was ready to abdicate but was dissuaded by Otto von Bismarck, whom he had installed as prime minister (1862). He cautiously supported Bismarck's policies in the Seven Weeks' War and the Franco-Prussian War. Proclaimed German emperor in 1871, he oversaw the continued rise of Germany as a European power
William
popular since the Norman Conquest
vaughan williams
English composer influenced by folk tunes and music of the Tudor period (1872-1958)
williams

    Расстановка переносов

    Wil·liams

    Турецкое произношение

    wîlyımz

    Произношение

    /ˈwəlyəmz/ /ˈwɪljəmz/

    Слово дня

    concilliabule
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