warren

listen to the pronunciation of warren
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A male given name
A surname
The system of burrows where rabbits live
A mazelike place of dark alleys etc in which it's easy to lose oneself; especially one that may be overcrowded
{n} a park or inclosure for rabbits
{i} male first name; family name; Earl Warren (1891-1974), American Supreme Court chief justice in 1953; Joseph Warren (1741-1775), American physician and statesman; Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989), American author and poet
used in medieval England and revived in the nineteenth century, partly with reference to the surname
a colony of rabbits an overcrowded residential area a series of connected underground tunnels occupied by rabbits United States jurist who served as chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1891-1974) United States writer and poet (1905-1989)
(like) a series of rabbit holes all joined together
A piece of ground for the breeding of rabbits
A warren is a group of holes in the ground which are connected by tunnels and which rabbits live in
If you describe a building or an area of a city as a warren, you mean that there are many narrow passages or streets. a warren of narrow streets. = maze. American jurist who served as the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1953-1969). American physician and patriot who instructed Paul Revere and William Dawes to make their ride to Lexington (April 18, 1775) and was killed in the Battle of Bunker Hill (June 17, 1775). American writer and critic primarily known for his poetry. His works include the novel All the King's Men (1946) and many poetry collections, such as Promises (1957). In 1985 he was appointed the first American poet laureate. Town (pop., 2000: 11,360), eastern Rhode Island, U.S. Located near Providence, it was settled in 1632 and was originally part of Massachusetts. In 1747 Rhode Island annexed it. It was pillaged and burned by the British during the American Revolution. It is now a summer resort. Beatty Henry Warren Henry Warren Beaty William Warren Bradley David Warren Brubeck Buffett Warren Burger Warren Earl Harding Warren Gamaliel Hastings Warren James Warren Jones Nirenberg Marshall Warren Spahn Warren Edward Stilwell Joseph Warren Warren Earl Warren Harry Warren Joseph Warren Mercy Otis Warren Robert Penn Weaver Warren Warren Commission
A maze of passageways
[waren] nominal variant wahrren (HL, opt ) stem warri- ~ warreh- (HL)
United States jurist who served as chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1891-1974)
a series of connected underground tunnels occupied by rabbits
a colony of rabbits
called beasts and fowls of warren
United States writer and poet (1905-1989)
A mazelike place of dark alleys etc in which its easy to lose oneself; especially one that may be overcrowded
an overcrowded residential area
A place for keeping flash, in a river
{i} system of rabbit burrows that make up a rabbit colony; crowded or intricately arranged living space
A franchise permitting one to keep animals, birds or fish in an enclosed space for breeding etc
A privilege which one has in his lands, by royal grant or prescription, of hunting and taking wild beasts and birds of warren, to the exclusion of any other person not entering by his permission
A place privileged, by prescription or grant the king, for keeping certain animals as hares, conies, partridges, pheasants, etc
murmurous
Warren Beatty
orig. Henry Warren Beaty born March 30, 1937, Richmond, Va., U.S. U.S. film actor, producer, director, and screenwriter. He studied acting with famed coach Stella Adler in New York and made his film debut in Splendor in the Grass (1961). He later starred in and produced the influential film Bonnie and Clyde (1967). Often cowriting, directing, or producing his own films, he later starred in Shampoo (1975), Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981, Academy Award for direction), and Bulworth (1998)
Warren Buffett
born Aug. 30, 1930, Omaha, Neb., U.S. U.S. businessman and investor. He attended the University of Nebraska (B.S., 1950) and Columbia University (M.S., 1951), where he was influenced by professor Benjamin Graham's approach toward value investing that is, purchasing shares of companies whose stocks are priced below their intrinsic value. Returning to his native Omaha, he turned $105,000 of initial investment in his Buffett Partnership (1956-69) into $105 million by the time of its dissolution. He then began investing in businesses, bought under the umbrella of the textile manufacturer Berkshire Hathaway. He is said to be the first person to have made $1 billion in the stock market. His financial reports are read eagerly by stock-market novices and experts alike for their pithy wisdom
Warren Burger
(1907-95) Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1969-86)
Warren Christopher
American Secretary of State during the presidency of Bill Clinton
Warren Commission
committee appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson to investigate the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy
Warren Commission
officially President's Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy (1963-64) Group appointed by Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson to investigate the circumstances surrounding John F. Kennedy's slaying and the shooting of his assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. It was chaired by Earl Warren and included two U.S. senators, two U.S. congressmen, and two former public officials. After months of investigation, it reported that Kennedy was killed by Oswald's rifle shots from the Texas School Book Depository and that Oswald's murder by Jack Ruby two days later was not part of a conspiracy to assassinate Kennedy. Its findings were later questioned in a number of books and articles and in a special congressional committee report in 1979, though no conclusive contradictory evidence was found
Warren E Burger
born Sept. 17, 1907, St. Paul, Minn., U.S. died June 25, 1995, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist. He graduated with honours from St. Paul (now William Mitchell) College of Law in 1931, after which he joined a prominent law firm and became active in the Republican Party. He was appointed an assistant U.S. attorney general (1953) and named to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia (1955), where his conservative approach commended him to Pres. Richard Nixon, who nominated him for chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1969. Contrary to the expectations of some, he did not try to reverse the liberal decisions on civil-rights issues and criminal law made during the tenure of his predecessor, Earl Warren. Under his leadership, the court upheld the 1966 Miranda v. Arizona decision, permitted busing as a means of ending racial segregation in public schools, and endorsed the use of racial quotas in the awarding of federal grants and contracts. Burger voted with the majority in Roe v. Wade (1973). Keenly interested in judicial administration, he became deeply involved in efforts to improve the judiciary's efficiency. He retired in 1986 and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1988
Warren Earl Burger
born Sept. 17, 1907, St. Paul, Minn., U.S. died June 25, 1995, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist. He graduated with honours from St. Paul (now William Mitchell) College of Law in 1931, after which he joined a prominent law firm and became active in the Republican Party. He was appointed an assistant U.S. attorney general (1953) and named to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia (1955), where his conservative approach commended him to Pres. Richard Nixon, who nominated him for chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1969. Contrary to the expectations of some, he did not try to reverse the liberal decisions on civil-rights issues and criminal law made during the tenure of his predecessor, Earl Warren. Under his leadership, the court upheld the 1966 Miranda v. Arizona decision, permitted busing as a means of ending racial segregation in public schools, and endorsed the use of racial quotas in the awarding of federal grants and contracts. Burger voted with the majority in Roe v. Wade (1973). Keenly interested in judicial administration, he became deeply involved in efforts to improve the judiciary's efficiency. He retired in 1986 and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1988
Warren Edward Spahn
born April 23, 1921, Buffalo, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 24, 2003, Broken Arrow, Okla. U.S. baseball pitcher. Spahn spent most of his career with the Boston (later Milwaukee) Braves (1942, 1946-64). He amassed 2,583 career strikeouts, giving him the third highest total in baseball history when he retired. His feat of winning 20 or more games in each of 13 seasons was also a record, as was his striking out at least 100 batters each year for 17 consecutive seasons (1947-63). His total of 363 wins established a record for left-handers. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973
Warren G Harding
born Nov. 2, 1865, Caledonia, Ohio, U.S. died Aug. 2, 1923, San Francisco, Calif. 29th president of the U.S. (1921-23). He became a newspaper publisher in Marion, Ohio, where he was allied with the Republican Party's political machine. He served successively as state senator (1899-1902), lieutenant governor (1903-04), and U.S. senator (1915-21), supporting conservative policies. At the deadlocked 1920 Republican presidential convention, he was chosen as the compromise candidate. Pledging a "return to normalcy" after World War I, he defeated James Cox with more than 60% of the popular vote, the largest margin to that time. On his recommendation, Congress established a budget system for the federal government, passed a high protective tariff, revised wartime taxes, and restricted immigration. His administration convened the Washington Conference (1921-22). His ill-advised cabinet appointments, including Albert Fall as secretary of the interior, led to the Teapot Dome scandal and earned his administration a reputation for corruption. After a vacation in Alaska in mid-June 1923, he arrived in San Francisco reportedly suffering from food poisoning and other ailments; he died there under unclear circumstances. He was succeeded by his vice president, Calvin Coolidge
Warren Gamaliel Harding
born Nov. 2, 1865, Caledonia, Ohio, U.S. died Aug. 2, 1923, San Francisco, Calif. 29th president of the U.S. (1921-23). He became a newspaper publisher in Marion, Ohio, where he was allied with the Republican Party's political machine. He served successively as state senator (1899-1902), lieutenant governor (1903-04), and U.S. senator (1915-21), supporting conservative policies. At the deadlocked 1920 Republican presidential convention, he was chosen as the compromise candidate. Pledging a "return to normalcy" after World War I, he defeated James Cox with more than 60% of the popular vote, the largest margin to that time. On his recommendation, Congress established a budget system for the federal government, passed a high protective tariff, revised wartime taxes, and restricted immigration. His administration convened the Washington Conference (1921-22). His ill-advised cabinet appointments, including Albert Fall as secretary of the interior, led to the Teapot Dome scandal and earned his administration a reputation for corruption. After a vacation in Alaska in mid-June 1923, he arrived in San Francisco reportedly suffering from food poisoning and other ailments; he died there under unclear circumstances. He was succeeded by his vice president, Calvin Coolidge
Warren Gamaliel Harding
(1865-1923) 29th president of the United States (1921-1923)
Warren Harding
the twenty-ninth president of the US, from 1921 to 1923 (1865-1923)
Warren Hastings
born Dec. 6, 1732, Churchill, near Daylesford, Oxfordshire, Eng. died Aug. 22, 1818, Daylesford British colonial administrator in India. He worked for the English East India Company from 1750, rising to membership in its council in Bengal (1761-64) and Madras (now Chennai; 1769). As governor of Bengal (1772-74), he moved the central government to Calcutta (now Kolkata) under direct British control and remodeled the justice system. In 1774 he acquired the new title of governor-general, with responsibilities for supervising other British settlements in India. His powers were shared with a council of four, several of whom tried to blame Hastings for the continuing abuses of power by Englishmen. From 1777 to 1783 he sought to counter the instability created by the fall of the Mughal Empire and tried to maintain peaceful relations with neighbouring states but was drawn into the Maratha Wars. This disrupted the company's trade and antagonized opinion in England, as did several dubious ventures Hastings entered into to raise extra funds. In 1785 he left India at peace and retired to England. In 1786 Edmund Burke introduced an impeachment process against him on charges of corruption; after a trial that lasted from 1788 to 1795, Hastings was acquitted
Warren Report
an official US report about the murder of President John F. Kennedy. Earl Warren and a special committee, called the Warren Commission, studied the facts relating to Kennedy's murder and decided that the President was killed by a single person, and that there was no conspiracy (=a secret plan involving several people) . Many people, however, do not accept this decision, and believe that Kennedy's death was organized by political opponents
Warren Spahn
born April 23, 1921, Buffalo, N.Y., U.S. died Nov. 24, 2003, Broken Arrow, Okla. U.S. baseball pitcher. Spahn spent most of his career with the Boston (later Milwaukee) Braves (1942, 1946-64). He amassed 2,583 career strikeouts, giving him the third highest total in baseball history when he retired. His feat of winning 20 or more games in each of 13 seasons was also a record, as was his striking out at least 100 batters each year for 17 consecutive seasons (1947-63). His total of 363 wins established a record for left-handers. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973
Warren Weaver
born 1894, Reedsburg, Wisc., U.S. died 1978 U.S. mathematician. He studied at the University of Wisconsin, taught there (1920-32), and directed the Rockefeller Foundation's Natural Science Division (1932-55). He is considered the first person to propose using electronic computers for the translation of natural languages. In a 1949 memo, he proposed that statistical techniques from the field of information theory could be used to enable computers to translate text from one natural language to another automatically. His proposal was based on the assumption that a document in a human language can be viewed as having been written in code, which can be broken like other codes
rabbit warren
An underground system of interconnected tunnels occupied by rabbits
rabbit warren
A confusing environment
Earl Warren
born March 19, 1891, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. died July 9, 1974, Washington, D.C. U.S. jurist and politician. He graduated from law school at the University of California, then served as a county district attorney (1925-39), state attorney general (1939-43), and governor of the state for three terms (1943-53). He was criticized for interning Japanese citizens in camps during World War II. His only electoral defeat came in 1948, when he ran for vice president on the Republican ticket with Thomas Dewey. In 1953 Pres. Dwight D. Eisenhower appointed Warren chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, a post he held until 1969. This was a period of sweeping changes in U.S. constitutional law. Under his leadership the court proved to be strongly liberal. Among Warren's notable opinions are those in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which held that segration in public education was unconstitutional; Reynolds v. Sims (1964), which declared the "one man, one vote" principle requiring state legislative reapportionment (1964); and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), which held that police must inform an arrestee of his right to remain silent and to have counsel present (appointed for him if he is indigent) and that a confession obtained in defiance of these requirements is inadmissible in court. After the assassination of Pres. John F. Kennedy, he chaired the Warren Commission
Harry Warren
After a few years as a song plugger in Tin Pan Alley, he began contributing tunes to Broadway musicals, including "You're My Everything" and "I Found a Million Dollar Baby in a Five-and-Ten-Cent Store." In 1932 he moved to Hollywood, where he collaborated on films such as Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933), 42nd Street (1933), Down Argentine Way (1940), and Sun Valley Serenade (1941; with "Chattanooga Choo-Choo"), and he received Academy Awards for the songs "Lullaby of Broadway," "You'll Never Know," and "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe." Between 1935 and 1950 he wrote more top-10 hit songs than any other songwriter
Harry Warren
orig. Salvatore Guaragna born Dec. 24, 1893, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 22, 1981, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. songwriter. The youngest of 12 children, Warren was self-taught musically. He toured with brass bands and carnivals from age
Henry Warren Beatty
orig. Henry Warren Beaty born March 30, 1937, Richmond, Va., U.S. U.S. film actor, producer, director, and screenwriter. He studied acting with famed coach Stella Adler in New York and made his film debut in Splendor in the Grass (1961). He later starred in and produced the influential film Bonnie and Clyde (1967). Often cowriting, directing, or producing his own films, he later starred in Shampoo (1975), Heaven Can Wait (1978), Reds (1981, Academy Award for direction), and Bulworth (1998)
Joseph Warren
born June 11, 1741, Roxbury, Mass. died June 17, 1775, Bunker Hill, Mass. American Revolutionary leader. He was a physician in Boston. He was active in patriot causes after passage of the Stamp Act (1765) and helped draft the Massachusetts colonial grievances called the Suffolk Resolves (1774). As a member of the Massachusetts Committee of Public Safety, he sent Paul Revere on his ride to Lexington. He was made a major general in the Revolutionary army and died in the Battle of Bunker Hill
Joseph Warren Stilwell
born March 19, 1883, Palatka, Fla., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1946, San Francisco, Calif. U.S. army officer. He graduated from West Point and served in World War I. He studied Chinese and served in Tianjin (1926-29) and as a military attaché in Beijing (1935-39). At the outbreak of World War II, he became chief of staff to Gen. Chiang Kai-shek and commanded Chinese armies in Burma (1939-42). He became commander of U.S. forces in China, Burma, and India and oversaw construction of the Ledo, or Stilwell, Road, a strategic military link with the Burma Road. Promoted to general (1944), he commanded the U.S. 10th Army in the Pacific (1945-46)
Marshall Warren Nirenberg
born April 10, 1927, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. biochemist. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. He demonstrated that each possible triplet (codon) of the four different kinds of nitrogen-containing bases found in DNA and (in some viruses) in RNA (with three exceptions) ultimately causes the incorporation of a specific amino acid into a cell protein. His research earned him a Nobel Prize in 1968, which he shared with Robert William Holley and Har Gobind Khorana, whose work, like Nirenberg's, helped show how genetic instructions in the cell nucleus control the composition of proteins
Mercy Otis Warren
orig. Mercy Otis born Sept. 25, 1728, Barnstable, Mass. died Oct. 19, 1814, Plymouth, Mass., U.S. U.S. poet, dramatist, and historian. The sister of James Otis, she received no formal education but nevertheless became a woman of letters and a friend and correspondent of leading political figures. She commented on the issues of the day in political satires, plays, and pamphlets. Though a defender of the American Revolution, she opposed the Constitution, arguing that power should rest with the states. Her most significant work, History of the Rise, Progress, and Termination of the American Revolution (3 vol., 1805), covered the period from 1765 to 1800
Robert Penn Warren
born April 24, 1905, Guthrie, Ky., U.S. died Sept. 15, 1989, Stratton, Vt. U.S. novelist, poet, and critic. Warren attended Vanderbilt University, where he joined the Fugitives, a group of poets who advocated the agrarian way of life in the South. Later he taught at several colleges and universities and helped found and edit The Southern Review (1935-42), possibly the most influential American literary magazine of the time. His writings often treat moral dilemmas in a South beset by the erosion of its traditional rural values. His best-known novel is All the King's Men (1946, Pulitzer Prize; film, 1949). The short-story volume The Circus in the Attic (1948) contains the notable "Blackberry Winter." He won Pulitzer prizes for poetry in 1958 and 1979 and became the first U.S. poet laureate in 1986
warrens
plural of warren
warren

    Расстановка переносов

    War·ren

    Турецкое произношение

    wôrın

    Произношение

    /ˈwôrən/ /ˈwɔːrən/

    Этимология

    [ 'wor-&n, 'wär- ] (noun.) 15th century. Two different Norman surnames, one from a Germanic given name war(in) "guard", another from a place La Varenne "the game park" in Normandy.

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