trussed

listen to the pronunciation of trussed
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
bound or secured closely; "the guard was found trussed up with his arms and legs securely tied"; "a trussed chicken
past of truss
truss
To tie up a bird before cooking it
truss
A bandage and belt used to hold a hernia in place
truss
A triangular bracket
truss
To support
truss
{n} a bandage for ruptures, a bundle of hay, a machine to pull a yard close to the mast
truss
{v} to pack close, gird, skewer, snatch up
truss
a framework of beams forming a rigid structure (as a roof truss)
truss
Structural Member or Complete Structure formed by Triangulated Framework
truss
To skewer; to make fast, as the wings of a fowl to the body in cooking it
truss
(medicine) a bandage consisting of a pad and belt; worn to hold a hernia in place by pressure
truss
To take fast hold of; to seize and hold firmly; to pounce upon
truss
To truss someone means to tie them up very tightly so that they cannot move. She trussed him quickly with stolen bandage, and gagged his mouth. = bind Truss up means the same as truss. She was trussed up with yellow nylon rope
truss
support structurally; "truss the roofs"; "trussed bridges"
truss
a ) A framework, resting on a bearing at each end, used for supporting a roof or some other load b ) Engineered or solid floor joist system
truss
To execute by hanging; to hang; usually with up
truss
A tuft of flowers formed at the top of the main stalk, or stem, of certain plants
truss
An assembly of wood or metal members serving as a lightweight but strong framework, taking the place of rafters in support of a roof or joists in floors
truss
A triangular bracket in architecture
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secure with or as if with ropes; "tie down the prisoners"; "tie up the old newspapes and bring them to the recycling shed"
truss
A frame or jointed structure designed to act as a beam of long span, while each member is usually subjected to longitudinal stress only, either tension or compression
truss
Architectural trusses when left visible, as in open timber roofs, often contain members not needed for construction, or are built with greater massiveness than is requisite, or are composed in unscientific ways in accordance with the exigencies of style
truss
A engineered structure of short framing members, such as beams, chords, and diagonals, assembled into a rigid support structure Frequently used for roofs, now becoming common for floor framing, as well Back to alphabetical list
truss
A structure made up of three or more members, with each member designed to carry a tension or compression force The entire structure in turn acts as a beam
truss
Any frame or structure with diagonal members that can withstand compression forces Examples include any girder, roof or floor truss system
truss
A bundle; a package; as, a truss of grass
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A number of wood planks framed together to bridge a space, such as a roof truss
truss
tie the wings and legs of a bird before cooking it
truss
A truss is a special belt with a pad that a man wears when he has a hernia in order to prevent it from getting worse. In building construction, a structural frame usually fabricated from pieces of metal or timber to form a series of triangles lying in a single plane. The linear members are subject only to compression or tension. The horizontal pieces forming the top and bottom of the truss are called the chords, and the sloping and vertical pieces connecting the chords are collectively called the web. Unlike a vault, the truss exerts no thrust but only downward pressure; supporting walls require no buttressing or extra thickening. Trusses have been used extensively in roofing and bridges. Wood trusses were probably first used in primitive dwellings 2500 BC. Wood was replaced by iron, which in turn was succeeded by steel
truss
A skeleton-like structure composed of short straight pieces (struts), some in compression and some in tension, joined to form a series of triangles
truss
A metal frame used to hang lanterns from Comes in three main designs - flat, box, and tri - which describe the shape created by the frame By virtue of their construction trusses are very strong and able to carry extremely heavy loads Most truss is now made of aluminium for weight reasons and sections can be bolted together to produce long pieces Used extensively in concert production to form the 'roof' over the stage from which to hang everything from lanterns to speakers Even followspots can mounted together with their operators who access their seats via circus style rope or wire ladders
truss
To secure legs firmly against the body of any poultry, folding wings under akimbo and tying with cooking twine to hold all parts firmly in place Trussing keeps all parts in place and allows the poultry to roast evenly with less shrinkage
truss
A roof structural support system made up from "2 by" wood components that are attached using press-on metal plates (as opposed to rafters that are nailed together) (See rafter)
truss
a framework of beams forming a rigid structure (as a roof truss) (medicine) a bandage consisting of a pad and belt; worn to hold a hernia in place by pressure support structurally; "truss the roofs"; "trussed bridges"
truss
A structural framework, made of either timber or metal, that is composed of individual members fastened together in a triangular arrangement
truss
{i} supporting structural framework made up of straight members; bundle; cluster of fruit or flowers
truss
{f} support with a truss; secure, bind
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A triangular arrangement of structural members that reduces nonaxial forces on the truss to a set of axial forces in the member See also "Space frame, Space truss "
truss
Manufactured roof-support member internally supported through cross braces called webs W-type and Howe trusses are the most common ones used in garage construction
truss
(architecture) a triangular bracket of brick or stone (usually of slight extent)
truss
A structural unit consisting of such members as beams, bars, and ties; usually arranged to form triangles Provides rigid support over wide spans with a minimum amount of material
truss
A triangle shaped structure used in place of individual rafters for roof framing The bottom horizontal member replaces the joists, while the upper members slope together at the top to replace the rafters
truss
To tie whole poultry with string or skewers so it will hold its shape during cooking
truss
A padded jacket or dress worn under armor, to protect the body from the effects of friction; also, a part of a woman's dress; a stomacher
truss
An assemblage of members of wood or metal, supported at two points, and arranged to transmit pressure vertically to those points, with the least possible strain across the length of any member
truss
A bandage or apparatus used in cases of hernia, to keep up the reduced parts and hinder further protrusion, and for other purposes
truss
The rope or iron used to keep the center of a yard to the mast
truss
A timber frame used to support the roof over the great hall
truss
To strengthen or stiffen, as a beam or girder, by means of a brace or braces
truss
Assemblage of timbers forming a rigid framework Example: A bent
truss
A pre-built component that functions as a structural support member A truss employs one or more triangles in its construction
truss
To secure or bind with ropes
truss
A framework of beams forming a rigid structure
truss
An old English farming measurement. One truss of straw equalled 36 pounds, a truss of old hay equalled 56 pounds, a truss of new hay equalled 60 pounds, and 36 trusses equalled one load
truss
A prefabricated framework of girders, struts and other items used to support a roof or other load-bearing elements
truss
To bind or pack close; to make into a truss
truss
To secure wings or legs close to poultry with skewers or string
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a jointed structure made up of individual members arranged and connected usually in a triangular pattern, so as to support longer spans
truss
To bind poultry for roasting with string or skewers Top of glossary U
trussed

    Произношение

    Этимология

    [ 'tr&s ] (transitive verb.) 13th century. Middle English, from Old French trousser, tourser to bundle, pack, from Vulgar Latin torsare, from torsus twisted; more at TORSADE.

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