sequestrate

listen to the pronunciation of sequestrate
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
To sequester
Having enclosed underground or partially buried fruiting bodies, like a truffle
to confiscate
set apart from others; "The dentist sequesters the tooth he is working on"
{f} take property temporarily under the settlement of a legal claim (Law)
keep away from others; "He sequestered himself in his study to write a book"
When property is sequestrated, it is taken officially from someone who has debts, usually after a decision in a court of law. If the debts are paid off, the property is returned to its owner. He tried to prevent union money from being sequestrated by the courts. = sequester + sequestration se·ques·tra·tion the sequestration of large areas of land. to take property away from the person it belongs to because they have not paid their debts (sequestrare; SEQUESTER)
sequestration
{n} a deprivation of profits
sequestrated
{s} temporarily seized pending the outcome of a legal claim (Law)
sequestration
The seizure of the property of an individual for the use of the state; particularly applied to the seizure, by a belligerent power, of debts due from its subjects to the enemy
sequestration
The cancellation of expenditures previously approved by the budgeting process Sequestration may occur in response to the enactment of appropriations that cause a breach in the discretionary spending limits or the enactment of spending legislation that causes a net increase in the deficit
sequestration
{i} isolation, seclusion; segregation, separation; temporary seizure of property pending the outcome of a legal claim (Law); formation of a sequestrum, formation of a piece of dead tissue that has detached from the surrounding healthy tissue (Medicine)
sequestration
Scottish term for a personal insolvency
sequestration
A chemical completing (forming or joining together) of metallic cations (such as iron) with certain inorganic compounds, such as phosphate Sequestration prevents the precipitation of the metals (iron) Also see chelation
sequestration
The cancellation of budget authority to enforce the discretionary spending caps and pay-as-you-go procedures established in the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 and most recently extended by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 Sequestration is triggered if the Office of Management and Budget determines that enacted discretionary appropriations exceed the discretionary spending caps or that enacted legislation affecting direct spending or receipts increases the deficit or reduces the surplus Changes in direct spending and receipts that increase the deficit or reduce the surplus trigger reductions in direct spending not otherwise exempted by law Discretionary spending in excess of the caps for a category of discretionary programs triggers the cancellation of budgetary resources within the discretionary spending category See discretionary spending caps and pay-as-you-go [Back to top]
sequestration
The withholding or cancellation of funds pursuant to the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act (the 1985 deficit reduction law) Sequestered funds are permanently canceled
sequestration
The fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide in a carbon sink through biological or physical processes, such as photosynthesis
sequestration
seizing property that belongs to someone else and holding it until profits pay the demand for which it was seized a writ that authorizes the seizure of property the action of forming a chelate or other stable compound with an ion or atom or molecule so that it is no longer available for reactions
sequestration
The carbon in carbon dioxide can be naturally absorbed back into trees and other vegetation Huge amounts of carbon are also absorbed into soils and the oceans Carbon can also be pumped back underground and stored in porous rocks This process of storing carbon in nature is called sequestration One hectare of forest can soak up 12 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year Planting huge numbers of trees could be a major act of sequestration, although eventually the trees die and emit the carbon as carbon dioxide again (see emissions)
sequestration
The act of separating, or setting aside, a thing in controversy from the possession of both the parties that contend for it, to be delivered to the one adjudged entitled to it
sequestration
the action of forming a chelate or other stable compound with an ion or atom or molecule so that it is no longer available for reactions
sequestration
is removal and storage, as when carbon dioxide is sequestered from the atmosphere by plants via photosynthesis
sequestration
See: Uptake
sequestration
Scientists' fancy way of saying removal We generally now see this term used in the context of "carbon capture and sequestration," where carbon refers to the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide
sequestration
The reaction of an inorganic compound, attaching itself to water hardness particles, and inactivating them so that they do not combine with other material in the water and settle out
sequestration
The capacity to absorb carbon dioxide out of the air through the process of photosynthesis
sequestration
The process or act of sequestering
sequestration
The state of being separated or set aside; separation; retirement; seclusion from society
sequestration
Displaced material escapes as free fragment(s), which may migrate elsewhere
sequestration
The cancellation of budgetary resources available for a fiscal year in order to enforce the discretionary spending limits and pay-as-you-go procedures in that year Pursuant to procedures set forth in the Deficit Control Act, a sequestration is triggered if the Office of Management and Budget determines that budget authority or outlays provided in appropriation acts exceed the discretionary spending limits or that enacted legislation affecting direct spending and receipts increases the deficit or reduces the surplus Discretionary spending in excess of any of the limits would cause the cancellation of budgetary resources within the applicable discretionary spending programs Changes in direct spending and receipts that increase the deficit or reduce the surplus would result in reductions in direct spending not otherwise exempt by law See direct spending, discretionary spending limits, and pay-as-you-go
sequestration
A prerogative process empowering certain commissioners to take and hold a defendant's property and receive the rents and profits thereof, until he clears himself of a contempt or performs a decree of the court
sequestration
Removal of greenhouses gases from the atmosphere by plants or technological measures The Strategy is concerned with carbon sequestration which is defined by the IPCC as the process through which carbon is absorbed by biomass such as trees, soils and crops
sequestration
A kind of execution for a rent, as in the case of a beneficed clerk, of the profits of a benefice, till he shall have satisfied some debt established by decree; the gathering up of the fruits of a benefice during a vacancy, for the use of the next incumbent; the disposing of the goods, by the ordinary, of one who is dead, whose estate no man will meddle with
sequestration
It may be voluntary or involuntary
sequestration
Removal of greenhouse gases from the atmosphere by plants or technological measures The Strategy is concerned with carbon sequestration which is defined by the IPCC as the process through which carbon is absorbed by biomass such as trees, soils and crops
sequestration
seizing property that belongs to someone else and holding it until profits pay the demand for which it was seized
sequestration
the act of segregating or sequestering; "sequestration of the jury"
sequestration
In law, a writ authorizing a law-enforcement official to take into custody the property of a defendant in order to enforce a judgment or to preserve the property until a judgment is rendered. In some civil-law jurisdictions, contested property may be deposited with a third party until it is determined to whom it properly belongs
sequestration
a writ that authorizes the seizure of property
sequestration
Disunion; disjunction
sequestrate
Избранное