secession

listen to the pronunciation of secession
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
voluntary withdrawal from fellowship, especially from political or religious bodies
{n} the act of withdrawing from
> See Wiener Sezession
(secede) Leave the Union
formal separation from an alliance or federation
The withdrawal of a State from the national Union
The act of seceding; separation from fellowship or association with others, as in a religious or political organization; withdrawal
formal separation from an alliance or federation the withdrawal of eleven Southern states from the Union in 1860 which precipitated the American Civil War an Austrian school of art and architecture parallel to the French art nouveau in the 1890s
The act of seceding
The act of 11 states withdrawing from the Union in 1860-1861 which directly led to the American Civil War Stamp Act Congress: This intercolonial body of political leaders from nine colonies met for a few days in October 1765 to consider ways to protest the Stamp Act The delegates drafted a petition declaring that Parliament should not tax Americans, since they were not represented in that legislative body The Congress showed that the colonies, when aggrieved, could act in unity, an important precedent for further intercolonial resistance efforts in years to come
{i} withdrawal from an alliance or organization
the withdrawal of eleven Southern states from the Union in 1860 which precipitated the American Civil War
the withdrawal of a state from the United States of America (Union)
an Austrian school of art and architecture parallel to the French art nouveau in the 1890s
The secession of a region or group from the country or larger group to which it belongs is the action of formally becoming separate. the Ukraine's secession from the Soviet Union. when a country or state officially stops being part of another country and becomes independent. (1860-61) Withdrawal of 11 Southern states from the U.S. The precipitating event was the election of Abraham Lincoln as president (1860). Since the Republican Party strongly opposed slavery and its extension into the new territories, most slaveholding states had vowed to secede if the Republican candidate won. Secession had been proclaimed by states'-rights advocates as a corollary to the compact that united the states, permitting them to withdraw as easily as they had joined. Earlier threats of secession were made at the Hartford Convention (1814), in the nullification crisis (1832), and in the 1850s before the Missouri Compromise. Secession was first approved by South Carolina (1860); six other states followed in the period before Lincoln was inaugurated in March 1861. After Lincoln resisted the South's attack on Fort Sumter, four other slaveholding states voted to secede, joining the newly formed Confederate States of America
Photo-Secession
Group of U.S. photographers influenced by the Pictorialist movement. Founded in 1902 by Alfred Stieglitz, the Photo-Secession sought recognition of photography as an art to be judged on its own terms. It was akin to such groups as the Linked Ring in London, and its name reflected that of the Sezession movement in Austria and Germany. The group regularly showed its work at the Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession, also known as "291" (its address on Fifth Avenue in New York City), a gallery run by Stieglitz. While Stieglitz did not believe in retouching or manipulating negatives or prints, others of the group, such as Edward Steichen, were adherents of the impressionistic soft-focus school and the new techniques. By 1910 many members of the group left due to different aesthetic visions. The record of the Photo-Secession is contained in the quarterly Camera Work (1903-17)
secess
Retirement; retreat; secession
secession
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