radical

listen to the pronunciation of radical
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
{i} radikal

Bazı Siyahiler daha radikal çözümler arıyor. - Some Blacks seek more radical solutions.

Onun iddiası seninkinden daha radikal. - His argument is more radical than yours.

{s} kökten
{s} köklü

O bir köklü değişiklikti. - It was a radical change.

esasi
(Matematik) radikal ifade
(Denizbilim) kökçe
(Ticaret) kökünden

Onun fikri yaşam tarzımızı kökünden değiştirecektir. - His idea will radically alter our way of life.

Bu keşif alanı kökünden değiştirmek için potansiyele sahiptir. - This discovery has the potential to radically change the field.

ifrat
(Tıp) radikal boyun disseksiyonu
aşırı
kökle ilgili
(değişiklik) köklü
kök işareti
kök

Bu keşif alanı kökünden değiştirmek için potansiyele sahiptir. - This discovery has the potential to radically change the field.

Onun fikri yaşam tarzımızı kökünden değiştirecektir. - His idea will radically alter our way of life.

köktenci
köke veya asla ait
{s} köke ait, köksel
Radikal Partiden bir ki
asıl
tabandan çıkan
{i} ana nota
kökten çıkan
{s} kök halinde olan
(Tıp) Kimyasal kök, radikal
{i} esas
{i} köken
{s} köke ait olan
bir sayı veya niceliğin köküne ait
{s} köksel
{s} esaslı, köklü, kökten, radikal
gram türetilmiş olmayan kelime
(Tıp) Bir olayın esas sebebi ile ilgili veya bu sebebe yönelmiş, radikal
(Tıp) Basit cisim, esasi madde
ekstrem
radical changes
büyük değişiklikler
radical changes
köklü değişiklikler
radical gap
(Bilgisayar) kök aralığı
radical sign
(Matematik) kök imi
radical theory
radikal teori
radical axis
köklü ekseni
radical axis
kuvvet ekseni
radical sign
kök işareti
radical center
kuvvet merkezi, köklü özelliği
radical-chic
radikal-chic
radical axis
(Matematik) radikal ekseni
radical behaviorism
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) radikal davranışçılık
radical cure
(Tıp) esaslı bir kür
radical economics
radikal ekonomi
radical islamic
radikal dinci
radical islamist
(Politika, Siyaset) kökten dinci
radical language
(Dilbilim) tek heceli dil
radical languages
(Dilbilim) tekheceli diller
radical parties
(Politika, Siyaset) radikal partiler
radical plane
(Matematik) radikal düzlemi
radical plane
köklü düzlemi
radical right parties
(Politika, Siyaset) köktenci sağ partiler
radical therapy
(Tıp) radikal tedavi
radical word
kök
radical word
kök halindeki sözcük
radically
kökünden

Onun fikri yaşam tarzımızı kökünden değiştirecektir. - His idea will radically alter our way of life.

Bu keşif alanı kökünden değiştirmek için potansiyele sahiptir. - This discovery has the potential to radically change the field.

acid radical
asit kökü
chemical radical
kimyasal radikal
radically
kökten
radically
kesin olarak
vinyl radical
vinil radikali
equally radical
eşit radikal
radicalization
radikalleşme
fraction and radical templates
(Bilgisayar) kesir ve kök şablonları
free radical
(Askeri) SERBEST KÖKSEL ATOM: Dış bir enerji uygulanarak sabit bir bileşik halden ayrılmış olan atom veya atom grubu. Uzunca zaman serbest halde kalabilirler
radically
radikal bir şekilde
radically
temelinden
radically
esasen
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
Excellent

That was a radical jump!.

In logographic writing systems as the Chinese writing system, the portion of a character (if any) that provides an indication of its meaning, as opposed to phonetic
A person with radical opinions
Of or pertaining to the root of a word
A free radical
In Semitic languages, any one of the set of consonants (typically three) that make up a root
Of or pertaining to the intrinsic nature of something
A member of the most progressive wing of the Liberal Party; someone favouring social reform (but generally stopping short of socialism)
Involving free radicals
Of or pertaining to a root (of a plant)
Thoroughgoing

The spread of the cancer required radical surgery, and the entire organ was removed.

A root (of a number or quantity)
Favouring fundamental change, or change at the root cause of a matter

His beliefs are radical.

A member of an influential, centrist political party favouring moderate social reform, a republican constitution, and secular politics
A group of atoms, joined by covalent bonds, that take part in reactions as a single unit
one who holds extreme views or advocates extreme measures
{i} person with extreme political views; root of a number (Mathematics)
{s} having extreme political views; fundamental, pertaining to a root; advocating complete reform
Radical people believe that there should be great changes in society and try to bring about these changes. threats by left-wing radical groups to disrupt the proceedings. conservative A radical is someone who has radical views. someone who has new and different ideas, especially someone who wants complete social and political change conservative. Term used in chemistry with one predominant and two subsidiary, looser meanings. It most often refers to a free radical. It can also mean an ion or a functional group. In politics, one who desires extreme change of part or all of the social order. The term (which derives from the Latin word for "root," and thus implies change beginning at a system's roots) was given this sense by Charles James Fox in 1797 when he demanded "radical reform" consisting of universal manhood suffrage. In France before 1848, republicans and advocates of universal male suffrage were called radicals. The term was later applied to Marxists (see Marxism) who called for fundamental social change to eradicate divisions among social classes. In popular usage, it is applied to political extremism, not necessarily violent, of both the left and the right. free radical Radical Republican Radical Socialist Party
A political extremist, mostly to the left, advocates a complete change of the system
(chemistry) two or more atoms bound together as a single unit and forming part of a molecule
Proceeding from a rootlike stem, or one which does not rise above the ground; as, the radical leaves of the dandelion and the sidesaddle flower
A group of atoms that is capable of remaining unchanged during a series of chemical reactions Such combinations (radicals) exist in the molecules of many organic compounds; sulfate (SO42-) is an inorganic radical
a molecule with an odd number of electrons Radicals do not have a completed octet and often undergo vigorous redox reactions Radicals produced within cells can react with membranes, enzymes, and genetic material, damaging or even killing the cell Radicals have been implicated in a number of degenerative conditions, from natural aging to Alzheimer's disease
A radical vessel
an atom or group of atoms with at least one unpaired electron; in the body it is usually an oxygen molecule than has lost an electron and will stabilize itself by stealing an electron from a nearby molecule; "in the body free radicals are high-energy particles that ricochet wildly and damage cells"
A radical is an expression of the form Square Root
A structural component of a Han character conventionally used for indexing The traditional number of such radicals is 214
of or relating to or constituting a linguistic root; "a radical verb form
This is the symbol used to show a square root, cube root, or another, higher, root If there is no small number at the top left, then it is a square root symbol The square root of 25 is If there is a small number at the top left, that means the radical symbol is being used for a higher root For example, means the cube root of 125
Of or pertaining to the root or root cause of the matter
Of or pertaining to the root; proceeding directly from the root
a highly reactive molecule that may pass intact from one compound to another but does not normally exist in a free state See also free radical
Of or pertaining to a radix or root; as, a radical quantity; a radical sign
The root of a quantity as notated by √n
(linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed; "thematic vowels are part of the stem"
Thorough going or fundamental
Belonging to, or proceeding from, the root of a plant; as, radical tubers or hairs
a person who has radical ideas or opinions
a sign placed in front of an expression to denote that a root is to be extracted
Favouring fundamental change, or change at the root cause of the matter
An atom or group of atoms that contains one or more unpaired electrons (usually very reactive species)
A man with both feet planted firmly in the air Franklin Delano Roosevelt
Political viewpoint with origins in Western Europe during the 19th century; advocated broader voting rights than liberals; in some cases advocated outright democracy; urged reforms in favor of the lower classes (p 703)
an atom or group of atoms with at least one unpaired electrons
Person with radical opinions
The initial root formed after seed germination This primary (or first) root produces first-order lateral roots The primary root eventually becomes the tap root of the plant
A radical quantity
Afeggag
Meaning "root", radical is normally used to mean a natal horoscope for living beings or any other kind of base horoscope, for example an electional or event chart drawn for the birth or start time The term Radix is sometimes used instead Typically used to distinguish radical positions from progressed or transitting positions
a character conveying the lexical meaning of a logogram
The root of a quantity as indicated by the sign
a person who advocates sweeping changes in the laws and methods of government with the least delay
especially of leaves; located at the base of a plant or stem; especially arising directly from the root or rootstock or a root-like stem; "basal placentation"; "radical leaves"
In English politics, a member of the more extreme wing of the Whig or Liberal Parties Used after 1797 as a term covering all those who supported the movement for parliamentary reform After the passing of the Reform bill of 1832, a number of radicals, dissatisfied with the extent of its reform, kept continual but ineffective pressure on the Whigs to extend the franchise to the working class Organized members of the working class were not in sympathy with them, due to their support of the Poor Law of 1834 and their hostility to the Chartists Their influence declined between 1839 and 1850, but revived with the disappearance of Chartism after 1850 They were active in promoting reform of the suffrage, achieved between 1867 and 1884
A structure with an unpaired electron (but excluding certain metal ions) In organic molecules, a radical is often associated with a highly reactive site of reduced valence (see °doublet) The term radical is sometimes used to describe a substructure within a molecule; the term free radical then describes a radical in this sense, viewed as the result of cleaving the bond linking the substructure to the rest of the molecule
a sign placed in front of an expression to denote that a root is to be extracted a character conveying the lexical meaning of a logogram a person who has radical ideas or opinions especially of leaves; located at the base of a plant or stem; especially arising directly from the root or rootstock or a root-like stem; "basal placentation"; "radical leaves"
arising from or going to the root; "a radical flaw in the plan"
Hence: Of or pertaining to the root or origin; reaching to the center, to the foundation, to the ultimate sources, to the principles, or the like; original; fundamental; thorough-going; unsparing; extreme; as, radical evils; radical reform; a radical party
Growing from or pertaining to a root; growing from a non-aerial stem
A primitive letter; a letter that belongs to the radix
Relating, or belonging, to the root, or ultimate source of derivation; as, a radical verbal form
A component of a Han character (Hanzi) which designates one of a number of semantic categories The traditional number of such radicals is 214
Very good; to be excellent
Specifically, a group of two or more atoms, not completely saturated, which are so linked that their union implies certain properties, and are conveniently regarded as playing the part of a single atom; a residue; called also a compound radical
a root sign
A radical is a symbol traditionally used to denote square roots, cube roots, etc A radical function is the inverse of a (restricted) power function with positive integer power
One who advocates radical changes in government or social institutions, especially such changes as are intended to level class inequalities; opposed to conservative
In such logographic writing systems as the Chinese writing system, the portion of a character (if any) that provides an indication of its meaning; contrasted with phonetic
A radical is the positive part of the n-th root of a quantity Examples: , , These may be simplified as 4, 3, 5x A fraction with radicals in the denominator may be changed to an equivalent fraction without radicals in the denominator by rationalizing the denominator
radical anion
a negatively charged radical ion
radical axes
plural form of radical axis
radical axis
The line containing the locus of points from which the segments respectively tangent to two given circles have equal length
radical cation
a positively charged radical ion
radical center
a point, at which the radical lines of three circles meet
radical ion
Any radical that also carries an electric charge; typically, the charge and unpaired electron are associated with the same atom
radical line
The line containing the locus of points from which the segments respectively tangent to two given circles have equal length
radical lines
plural form of radical line
radical plane
The plane containing the circle formed by the intersection of two spheres (or whose points have equal power with respect to two non-intersecting spheres)
radical corruption
(Nükleer Mühendislik) Total depravity (also called absolute inability, radical corruption, or total corruption) is a theological doctrine derived from the Augustinian concept of original sin. It is the teaching that, as a consequence of the Fall of Man, every person born into the world is enslaved to the service of sin and, apart from the efficacious or prevenient grace of God, is utterly unable to choose to follow God, refrain from evil, or accept the gift of salvation as it is offered
Radical Republican
Member of the Republican Party in the 1860s committed to the emancipation of slaves and the equal treatment and enfranchisment of blacks. Zealous antislavery advocates in the Congress pressed Pres. Abraham Lincoln to include emancipation as a war aim. They later opposed his policy of lenient Reconstruction of the South under presidential control and passed harsher measures in the Wade-Davis Bill. After Lincoln's death the Radicals supported Pres. Andrew Johnson but soon demanded congressional control of Reconstruction. Johnson's attempt to break the Radicals' power led them to pass the Tenure of Office Act; his challenge of the act led to his impeachment. Radical Republican leaders included Henry Winter Davis (1817-65), Thaddeus Stevens, Charles Sumner, and Benjamin Butler. Their influence waned as white control over Southern governments gradually returned in the 1870s
Radical-Socialist Party
French political party. The oldest of France's political parties, it was founded in 1901 but originated in the 1870s in the reformist wing of the French Republican Party, known as the Radicals, led by Georges Clemenceau. Traditionally a centrist party, it was most prominent in the Third Republic and Fourth Republic. In the 1920s and '30s it joined coalition governments with the French Socialist Party. After 1945 it led other centrist groups to form politically important coalitions. By the late 20th century, however, it was only a minor party. In 1998 it renamed itself the Radical Party of the Left
radical Islam
fundamental Islam
radical argument
extreme claim, fanatical claim
radical change
180 degree shift in thinking, extreme change
radical chic
an affectation of radical left-wing views and the fasionable dress and lifestyle that goes with them
radical error
major mistake, grave error
radical expression
An expression or form in which radical signs appear
radical hysterectomy
surgical removal of the uterus and the ovaries and oviducts and cervix and related lymph nodes
radical mastectomy
removal of a breast and the underlying muscles (pectoralis major and pectoralis minor) and lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
radical sign
sign placed before a number indicating that a root is to be extracted (Mathematics)
aminoxyl radical
The uncharged form of an aminoxide derived from hydroxylamines by removal of a proton; their structure is best represented as R2NO. R2N.+-O-
aminyl radical
The uncharged radical H2N. formally derived from ammonia by removing a hydrogen atom; and any of its derivatives R2N
free radical
any molecule, ion or atom that has one or more unpaired electrons; they are generally highly reactive and often only occur as transient species
acid radical
acid molecule remnant once the acidic hydrogen has been removed; radical created from an acid by loss of one or more hydrogen ions
alkyl radical
any of a series of univalent groups that are derived from aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl group (Chemistry)
free radical
A destructive fragment of oxygen produced as a by-product when cells use oxygen to burn fat
free radical
a molecule that contains at least one unpaired electron Free radicals are highly reactive and bind with other molecules, thus disrupting normal cellular processes and causing cellular damage (oxidative stress)
free radical
a molecule that contains at least one unpaired electron Free radicals (reactive oxygen species) are a byproduct of normal metabolism They are highly reactive and bind with electrons from other molecules, potentially initiating chain reactions as successive molecules lose and gain electrons The robbing of electrons by free radicals can disrupt normal cellular processes and cause cellular damage (oxidative stress) See also antioxidant, oxidation
free radical
a species with an unpaired electron
free radical
a molecule with an odd, unpaired electron, which is highly unstable and can have distructive effects
free radical
a highly chemically reactive atom, molecule or molecular fragment with a free or unpaired electron Free radicals are produced in many different ways such as, normal metabolic processes, ultraviolet radiation from the sun, nuclear radiation and the breakdown in the body of spoiled fats Free radicals have been implicated in aging, cancer, cardiovascular disease and other kinds of damage to the body, (see antioxidants)
free radical
free radical noun
free radical
A molecule with an unpaired electron In the body, free radicals are generated by both enzymatic and chemical reactions, including the metabolism of fats Free radicals are believed to be involved in extensive damage to the body, including aging cancer, heart disease and arthritis
free radical
molecules containing an odd number of electrons resulting in an open bond or half bond, making them highly reactive and as a result, potentially destructive
free radical
an atom or group of atoms with at least one unpaired electron; in the body it is usually an oxygen molecule than has lost an electron and will stabilize itself by stealing an electron from a nearby molecule; "in the body free radicals are high-energy particles that ricochet wildly and damage cells
free radical
An unstable and highly reactive molecule, bearing an atom with an unpaired electron, that nonspecifically reacts with a variety of organic structures such as DNA The interaction of ionizing radiation with water can generate free radicals in the form of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl groups that are potent oxidizing agents
free radical
Free radicals are atoms that contain one or more unpaired electrons. Free radicals are believed to be a cause of ageing, heart disease, and some cancers. An atom or group of atoms that has at least one unpaired electron and is therefore unstable and highly reactive. In animal tissues, free radicals can damage cells and are believed to accelerate the progression of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and age-related diseases. an atom or group of atoms with at least one free electron, which combines with other atoms very easily. or radical Molecule containing at least one unpaired electron. Most molecules contain even numbers of electrons, and their covalent bonds normally consist of shared electron pairs. Cleavage of such bonds produces two separate free radicals, each with an unpaired electron (in addition to any paired electrons). They may be electrically charged or neutral and are highly reactive and usually short-lived. They combine with one another or with atoms that have unpaired electrons. In reactions with intact molecules, they abstract a part to complete their own electronic structure, generating new radicals that go on to react with other molecules. Such chain reactions are particularly important in decomposition of substances at high temperatures and in polymerization. In the human body, oxidized (see oxidation-reduction) free radicals can damage tissues. Antioxidant nutrients (e.g., vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium) may reduce these effects. Heat, ultraviolet radiation, and ionizing radiation (see radiation injury) all generate free radicals. They are magnetic, so their properties can be studied with such techniques as magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements
free radical
A neutral atom or molecule that contains an unpaired electron
free radical
Free radicals are aggressive atoms or molecules that cause permanent damage when they react with cell components They are highly reactive because they have unpaired electrons Free radicals attack the nearest stable molecule and "steal" its electron, thereby oxidizing the molecule Research shows that free radicals are associated with premature aging and the degenerative diseases
free radical
A highly reactive chemical species carrying no charge and having a single unpaired electron in an orbital
free radical
a species with an unpaired electron (22 5)
free radical
A chemically active, charged atom or complex of atoms containing an excess or deficient number of electrons Radicals seek to transfer electrons from or to other atomic complexes in order to achieve a more stable configuration This process can damage the large molecules within cells See Oxidation
free radical
A molecule with an unpaired electron, making it highly reactive
free radical
This is a substance which can bring about negative changes in the body as a result of its oxidizing effects Some changes include: hardening of the arteries and onset of certain cancers
free radical
an atom or group of atoms that has at least one unpaired electron Because another element can easily pick up this free electron and cause a chemical reaction, these free radicals can effect dramatic and destructive changes in the body
free radical
Any molecular fragment containing an unpaired electron Such fragments are often very reactive, reacting with nearby molecules as fast as they encounter them Radicals formed on the surface of catalysts may be much more stable and able to undergo more selective chemistry This is due to the stabilizing influence of the surface
free radical
A molecule containing an odd number of electrons
free radical
A molecule that can cause oxidative damage to a cell or tissue Antioxidants are used to destroy free radicals
free radical
A molecule containing an unpaired electron, typically highly unstable and reactive Free radicals can damage the molecular machinery of biological systems, leading to cross-linking and mutation
free radical
an unstable, destructive oxygen molecule created as a normal byproduct of metabolism
free radical
short-lived form of compounds that exist with an unpaired electron in the outer electron shell; to complete the electron pair the compound seeks an additional electron from another molecule often from electron dense areas of the cell such as the nucleus or the cell membrane
free radical
An atom or group of atoms broken away from a stable compound by application of external energy, and, although containing unpaired electrons, remaining free for transitory or longer periods
made radical changes
introduced major changes
modified radical mastectomy
removal of a breast and the pectoralis minor and some lymph nodes in the adjacent armpit
radicalization
{i} process of making extreme, act of making radical (also radicalisation)
radicalization
the process of radicalizing
radically
In a radical manner
radically
Without derivation; primitively; essentially
radically
in a radical manner; "she took a radically different approach"
radically
in a radical manner; "she took a radically different approach
radically
In a radical manner; at, or from, the origin or root; fundamentally; as, a scheme or system radically wrong or defective
radically
in a radical manner, in an extreme manner; completely, fundamentally, thoroughly
radicals
plural of radical
settler radical
extremist that seeks to settle in the West Bank or Gaza for political reasons
radical
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