michael

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Турецкий язык - Английский Язык
mike
St. michael yortusu
Michaelmas
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
An archangel associated with defending Israel in the tribulation
A male given name
See also Mkl. or Michael Romanov Russian Mikhail Fyodorovich Romanov born July 22, 1596 died July 23, 1645, Moscow Tsar of Russia (1613-45) and founder of the Romanov dynasty. A young nobleman elected as tsar after the chaotic Time of Troubles, he allowed his mother's relatives to direct the government early in his reign. They restored order to Russia and made peace with Sweden (1617) and Poland (1618). In 1619 his father, released from captivity in Poland, returned to Russia and became coruler. Michael's father dominated the government, increasing contact with western Europe and strengthening central authority and serfdom. After his death in 1633, Michael's maternal relatives once again held sway. born Oct. 25, 1921, Sinaia, Rom. King of Romania. After his father, the future king Carol II, had been excluded from the royal succession (1926), Michael was proclaimed king under a three-member regency. Carol reclaimed the throne in 1930, and Michael was reduced to crown prince. With Carol's abdication in 1940, Michael again became king but was in effect a prisoner of the military dictator Ion Antonescu. In 1944 he helped lead the coup that overthrew the military regime and severed Romania's ties with the Axis powers. He strongly opposed the communists' subsequent rise to power, but was forced to abdicate in 1947. He went into exile in Switzerland and became an executive with a U.S. brokerage firm. In 1997 his Romanian citizenship was restored; he subsequently visited the country and sought the return of property holdings that were confiscated. Michael Romanov Bennett Michael Michael Bennett Difiglia Bishop John Michael Coetzee John Michael Cohan George Michael Collins Michael Curley James Michael Curtiz Michael DeBakey Michael Ellis Douglas Michael Dummett Sir Michael Anthony Eardley Eisner Michael Dammann Faraday Michael Faulhaber Michael von Foot Michael Graves Michael Gross Michael Harnett William Michael Healy Timothy Michael Jackson Michael Joseph Johnson Michael Duane Jordan Michael Jeffrey Kidd Michael Michael Leigh Manley Michael Norman Mansfield Michael Joseph Michael Cerularius Michael VIII Palaeologus Maria Ludwig Michael Mies Milken Michael R. Michael Igor Peschkowsky Michael O'Donovan Ondaatje Philip Michael Stephen Michael Ovett Pacher Michael Powell Michael Latham Redgrave Sir Michael Scudamore Stephen Michael Reich Richter Conrad Michael Michael Royko Schwab Charles Michael Michael Sinnott Servetus Michael Spence A. Michael Thonet Michael Tippett Sir Michael Kemp Michael Gerald Tyson Ventris Michael George Francis Marion Michael Morrison
{i} Michael of Romania (born in 1921), king of Romania (1927-30, 1940-47), exiled Romanian king; militant archangel; narrative poem by Wordsworth; male first name
given name, male, from Hebrew
in the Old Testament of the Bible, an archangel (=a good spirit of the highest rank who lives with God in Heaven). In the Bible and the Qurn, one of the archangels. The captain of the heavenly hosts, he was invoked by early Christian armies against the heathen. In Christian tradition he is thought to escort the soul into the presence of God at the time of death. In art he is depicted as a warrior, sword in hand, in triumph over a dragon. His feast day, known in England as Michaelmas, is September
(Old Testament) the guardian archangel of the Jews
The angel whom the Book of Daniel represents as being the spirit prince, guardian, and protector of Israel (Dan 10: 13, 21; 12: 1) Jude 9 depicts him as an archangel fighting with Satan for Moses' body In Revelation 12: 7, he leads the war against the dragon (Satan) and casts him from heaven His name means "Who is like God?"
Rumanian king; forced to abdicate in 1947
Well-organized vampire of Detroit
utas
temptation
battle
Michael Jackson
a very successful US pop singer, songwriter, and dancer. As a child, he was a member of The Jackson Five in the 1970s. He then worked on his own and became even more successful with the albums Thriller and Bad, and with his performances in concert (1958- ). born Aug. 29, 1958, Gary, Ind., U.S. U.S. singer and songwriter. The nine-year-old Jackson became the lead singer of The Jackson Five, a family group formed by his father. Their hits on the Motown label included "I Want You Back" and "ABC." Though Michael remained a member of the group until 1984, he began recording under his own name in 1971. His album Off the Wall (1979) sold millions; his next solo album, Thriller (1982), sold more than 40 million copies, becoming the best-selling album in history. The emerging format of the music video was an important aspect of Jackson's work; his videos for "Beat It" and "Billie Jean" (both 1983) featured his highly influential dancing style (notably his trademark "moonwalk"). He later released the albums Bad (1987), Dangerous (1991), and HIStory (1995). Despite his many efforts to speak out on social issues, Jackson's eccentric, secluded lifestyle stirred controversy in the early 1990s. His reputation was seriously damaged in 1993 when he was accused of child molestation by a 13-year-old boy. Several of his siblings, notably his sister Janet (b. 1966), have also enjoyed solo success
Michael Jackson
(born 1958) American pop singer songwriter and dancer known for his dancing style who started his career at the age of five when he joined his brothers' singing group known as "the Jackson 5" (his career declined after he faced allegations in 1993 that he had molested a 13-year-old boy and in 2003 he was arrested on many counts of child molestation which he denies)
Michael Jordan
(born 1963), American professional basketball player and actor
michael jackson
United States singer who began singing with his four brothers and later became a highly successful star during the 1980s (born in 1958)
Michael Bennett
orig. Michael Bennett Difiglia born April 8, 1943, Buffalo, N.Y., U.S. died July 2, 1987, Tucson, Ariz. U.S. dancer, choreographer, and stage musical director. He began dancing at age three and left high school to tour in a production of West Side Story. His major contribution to dance was as choreographer-director of Broadway musicals such as Promises, Promises (1968), Company (1970), Follies (1971), and Dreamgirls (1981). His most remarkable musical was A Chorus Line (1975, Pulitzer Prize), which he conceived, directed, and choreographed. Bennett personally received eight Tony awards during his career
Michael Caine
{i} (born 1933) English movie actor
Michael Cerularius
born 1000, Constantinople died Jan. 21, 1059, Madytus, near Constantinople Greek Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople (1043-58). He thwarted Constantine IX's efforts to ally the Byzantine and Roman empires against the Normans, and he closed Latin churches in Constantinople that refused to use the Greek language and liturgy (1052). When negotiations broke down between Michael and the papal legates sent by Leo IX, each side excommunicated the other, initiating the Schism of 1054. Michael forced Constantine to support the schism, but in 1058 he was exiled by Constantine's successor
Michael Collins
Collins, Mi·chael (1890-1922) an Irish politician and military leader who was involved in the fight to make Ireland independent of the UK. He helped to achieve the agreement that established the southern part of Ireland as an independent state, but he was killed by political opponents who wanted independence for the whole of Ireland. a US astronaut who was one of the three-man team involved in the first landing on the moon in 1969. Collins stayed in the main spacecraft, Apollo 11, while his companions Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin landed on the moon (1930-). born Oct. 16, 1890, Clonakilty, County Cork, Ire. died Aug. 22, 1922, Beal-na-Blath, Cork Irish national leader. He worked in London (1906-16), then returned to fight in the Easter Rising. Elected as a member of Sinn Féin to the Irish assembly (1918), he became the Irish republic's first minister of home affairs. He was general of the volunteers and director of intelligence of the Irish Republican Army in the Anglo-Irish War. In 1921 he signed the controversial Anglo-Irish Treaty, which gave Ireland dominion status, though with provisions for partition and for an oath of allegiance to the crown. He and Arthur Griffith then became leaders of the provisional government. When civil war broke out, Collins commanded the government forces fighting the anti-treaty republicans, and on Griffith's death he became head of the government. Ten days later he was killed in an ambush at age 31
Michael Crichton
{i} (born 1942) United States author of many famous books (such as "Jurassic Park", "Congo", and many others) and movie and television producer (creator of the popular television series "ER")
Michael Curtiz
(1888-1962), a Hungarian-born film director who had a long and successful career in Hollywood. He won an Oscar for best director in 1943 for Casablanca. His other films included The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), Angels With Dirty Faces (1938), Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) and White Christmas (1954). orig. Mihály Kertész born Dec. 24, 1888, Budapest, Hung. died April 10, 1962, Hollywood, Calif., U.S. Hungarian-U.S. film director. He directed films in Hungary and elsewhere in Europe before he was invited to Hollywood by Warner Brothers in 1926. He directed more than 100 Warner Brothers films, including adventure movies with Errol Flynn such as Captain Blood (1935), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), and The Sea Hawk (1940). His many other notable films include Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), the hugely successful Casablanca (1942, Academy Award), Mildred Pierce (1945), and White Christmas (1954)
Michael Dammann Eisner
born March 7, 1942, Mount Kisco, N.Y., U.S. U.S. entertainment executive. He worked at ABC-TV (1966-76) before becoming president of Paramount Pictures (1976-84), and he served as head of the Disney Co. from 1984. He was instrumental in reviving Disney as a major movie studio with films such as Pretty Woman (1990), and he restored Disney's reputation for classic animation with Beauty and the Beast (1991) and The Lion King (1995), which also became hit Broadway musicals. He expanded the company into fields such as television, publishing, home video, and cruise ship travel
Michael DeBakey
born Sept. 7, 1908, Lake Charles, La., U.S. U.S. surgeon. He received his M.D. from Tulane University. In 1932 he devised the "roller pump," to be used in heart-lung machines. His work with the U.S. Surgeon General's office led to the development of mobile army surgical hospitals (MASH units). He also developed an efficient method of grafting frozen blood vessels to correct aortic aneurysms and pioneered the use of plastic tubing instead of grafts (1956). He was the first to perform a successful coronary artery bypass, and in 1963 he was the first to insert a mechanical device into the chest to assist the heart. He edited the Yearbook of Surgery (1958-70). His many awards include the Medal of Freedom
Michael Dell
President and General Manager of the Dell computer company in Texas (USA)
Michael Douglas
(born 1944) American film actor director and producer, winner of the 1975 Academy Award for Best Picture for his work on "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Michael Douglas
born Sept. 25, 1944, New Brunswick, N.J., U.S. U.S. actor and producer. The son of Kirk Douglas, he made his film acting debut in 1969 and began his career as a producer with One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975). He produced and acted in films such as The China Syndrome (1979), Romancing the Stone (1984), Fatal Attraction (1987), and Wall Street (1987, Academy Award) and also starred in Basic Instinct (1992), Traffic (2000), and Wonder Boys (2000)
Michael Duane Johnson
born Sept. 13, 1967, Dallas, Texas, U.S. U.S. sprinter. For much of the 1990s he was virtually unbeaten in the 200-m and 400-m races. He shared an Olympic gold medal in 1992 on the world-record-setting 4 400-m relay team, and at the 1996 Olympics he became the first man to win gold medals in both the 200 m and 400 m, setting a world record of 19.32 seconds in the 200 m. In 1999 he set a new world record of 43.18 seconds in the 400 m. In the 2000 Olympics he again won two gold medals
Michael Eisner
born March 7, 1942, Mount Kisco, N.Y., U.S. U.S. entertainment executive. He worked at ABC-TV (1966-76) before becoming president of Paramount Pictures (1976-84), and he served as head of the Disney Co. from 1984. He was instrumental in reviving Disney as a major movie studio with films such as Pretty Woman (1990), and he restored Disney's reputation for classic animation with Beauty and the Beast (1991) and The Lion King (1995), which also became hit Broadway musicals. He expanded the company into fields such as television, publishing, home video, and cruise ship travel
Michael Ellis DeBakey
born Sept. 7, 1908, Lake Charles, La., U.S. U.S. surgeon. He received his M.D. from Tulane University. In 1932 he devised the "roller pump," to be used in heart-lung machines. His work with the U.S. Surgeon General's office led to the development of mobile army surgical hospitals (MASH units). He also developed an efficient method of grafting frozen blood vessels to correct aortic aneurysms and pioneered the use of plastic tubing instead of grafts (1956). He was the first to perform a successful coronary artery bypass, and in 1963 he was the first to insert a mechanical device into the chest to assist the heart. He edited the Yearbook of Surgery (1958-70). His many awards include the Medal of Freedom
Michael Ende
{i} (1929-1995) German author of fantasy and children's books
Michael Faraday
{i} (1791-1867), English chemist and physicist who discovered of electromagnetism and who contributed much to electrochemistry
Michael Faraday
a British scientist who discovered the relationship between electricity and magnetism and produced the first dynamo (=a machine that changes some other form of power into electricity) (1791-1867). born Sept. 22, 1791, Newington, Surrey, Eng. died Aug. 25, 1867, Hampton Court English physicist and chemist. Son of a blacksmith, he received only a basic education in a church Sunday school, but he went to work as an assistant to Humphry Davy, from whom he learned chemistry. He discovered a number of new organic compounds, including benzene, and was the first to liquefy a "permanent" gas. His major contributions were in the fields of electricity and magnetism. He was the first to report induction of an electric current from a magnetic field. He invented the first electric motor and dynamo, demonstrated the relation between electricity and chemical bonding, discovered the effect of magnetism on light, and discovered and named diamagnetism. He also provided the experimental, and much of the theoretical, foundation on which James Clerk Maxwell built his electromagnetic field theory. In 1833 he was appointed professor at the Royal Institution. After 1855 he retired to a house provided by Queen Victoria, but he declined a knighthood
Michael Foot
born July 23, 1913, Plymouth, Devon, Eng. Leader of Great Britain's Labour Party (1980-83). He worked as a newspaper editor and columnist (1937-74) and served in Parliament (1945-55, 1960-92). He served in Harold Wilson's cabinet as secretary of state for employment (1974-76) and leader of the House of Commons (1976-79). A left-wing socialist, Foot became the party's chief in 1980 by defeating its right-wing candidate. This and other left-wing trends caused some Labourites to resign to found the Social Democratic Party. His books include Aneurin Bevan (2 vol.; 1962, 1973)
Michael George Francis Ventris
v. born July 12, 1922, Wheathampstead, Hertfordshire, Eng. died Sept. 6, 1956, near Hatfield, Hertfordshire British architect and cryptographer. At age 14 he heard a lecture on the continuing mystery of Linear B script (see Linear A and Linear B) and resolved to decipher it. In 1952 he determined that Linear B was Greek in its oldest known form, dating from 1400-1200 BC. He collaborated with John Chadwick (1920-98) on Documents in Mycenaean Greek (1956), published a few weeks after his own death in an auto accident
Michael Graves
born July 9, 1934, Indianapolis, Ind., U.S. U.S. architect and designer. He studied at Harvard University and in 1962 began a long teaching career at Princeton University while designing private houses in the abstract and austere style of orthodox Modernism. In the late 1970s he rejected Modernist expression and began seeking a larger, postmodernist vocabulary. The hulking masses of the Portland Building in Portland, Ore. (1980), and the Humana Building in Louisville, Ky. (1982), display his highly personal, Cubist rendering of such Classical elements as colonnades and loggias. Though considered somewhat awkward, these and his later buildings (e.g., Indianapolis Art Center, 1996) have been acclaimed for their ironic interpretation of traditional forms. Among his later projects were the restoration of the Washington Monument (2000) and the creation of a line of household items, including kitchenware and furniture, for the discount retailer Target
Michael Gross
born June 17, 1964, Frankfurt am Main, W.Ger. German swimmer. With a height of 6 ft 7 in. (2 m), Gross acquired the nickname "the Albatross" because of his wide arm span. He won six Olympic medals (two gold and two silver in 1984, one gold and one bronze in 1988) and set world records in the 200-m freestyle and 100-m butterfly
Michael Hauben
{i} (1973-2001) computer specialist and author who coined the term Netizen
Michael I
King of Romania (1927-1930 and 1940-1947). He was forced to abdicate in 1947 by the newly formed Communist government
Michael J. Fox
{i} (born 1961) famous Canadian-born United States television and movie actor who was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 1991
Michael Jeffrey Jordan
born Feb. 17, 1963, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. U.S. basketball player. As a freshman in 1982, he helped the University of North Carolina win the collegiate national championship. Drafted by the Chicago Bulls in 1984, he won 10 scoring titles and 5 Most Valuable Player awards while leading the Bulls to six championships (1991-93, 1996-98). He was also part of the 1984 and 1992 U.S. Olympic basketball teams that won gold medals. He retired briefly in 1993, hoping to play professional baseball, but returned to the Bulls in 1995. He retired again in 1999, but, after a stint as an owner and general manager of the Washington Wizards, Jordan returned to play for that team in 2001. Known as "Air Jordan" for his exceptional leaping ability, he combined acrobatic play with a fierce competitive spirit and was considered among the game's greatest players. His success on the court and in the business world made him one of the most popular and recognized athletes of all time
Michael Johnson
born Sept. 13, 1967, Dallas, Texas, U.S. U.S. sprinter. For much of the 1990s he was virtually unbeaten in the 200-m and 400-m races. He shared an Olympic gold medal in 1992 on the world-record-setting 4 400-m relay team, and at the 1996 Olympics he became the first man to win gold medals in both the 200 m and 400 m, setting a world record of 19.32 seconds in the 200 m. In 1999 he set a new world record of 43.18 seconds in the 400 m. In the 2000 Olympics he again won two gold medals
Michael Jordan
born Feb. 17, 1963, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. U.S. basketball player. As a freshman in 1982, he helped the University of North Carolina win the collegiate national championship. Drafted by the Chicago Bulls in 1984, he won 10 scoring titles and 5 Most Valuable Player awards while leading the Bulls to six championships (1991-93, 1996-98). He was also part of the 1984 and 1992 U.S. Olympic basketball teams that won gold medals. He retired briefly in 1993, hoping to play professional baseball, but returned to the Bulls in 1995. He retired again in 1999, but, after a stint as an owner and general manager of the Washington Wizards, Jordan returned to play for that team in 2001. Known as "Air Jordan" for his exceptional leaping ability, he combined acrobatic play with a fierce competitive spirit and was considered among the game's greatest players. His success on the court and in the business world made him one of the most popular and recognized athletes of all time
Michael Joseph Jackson
born Aug. 29, 1958, Gary, Ind., U.S. U.S. singer and songwriter. The nine-year-old Jackson became the lead singer of The Jackson Five, a family group formed by his father. Their hits on the Motown label included "I Want You Back" and "ABC." Though Michael remained a member of the group until 1984, he began recording under his own name in 1971. His album Off the Wall (1979) sold millions; his next solo album, Thriller (1982), sold more than 40 million copies, becoming the best-selling album in history. The emerging format of the music video was an important aspect of Jackson's work; his videos for "Beat It" and "Billie Jean" (both 1983) featured his highly influential dancing style (notably his trademark "moonwalk"). He later released the albums Bad (1987), Dangerous (1991), and HIStory (1995). Despite his many efforts to speak out on social issues, Jackson's eccentric, secluded lifestyle stirred controversy in the early 1990s. His reputation was seriously damaged in 1993 when he was accused of child molestation by a 13-year-old boy. Several of his siblings, notably his sister Janet (b. 1966), have also enjoyed solo success
Michael Joseph Mansfield
known as Mike Mansfield born March 16, 1903, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 5, 2001, Washington, D.C. U.S. politician who was the longest-serving majority leader (1961-77) in the U.S. Senate. He worked in Montana copper mines and later taught history at Montana State University. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1943 to 1953 and in the Senate from 1953 to 1977. An outspoken critic of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, he sponsored a 1971 bill calling for a cease-fire and phased withdrawal. He was a persistent critic of Pres. Richard Nixon, especially during the Watergate scandal. After retiring, he served as U.S. ambassador to Japan (1977-88)
Michael Kidd
orig. Milton Gruenwald born Aug. 12, 1919, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. U.S. dancer, choreographer, and director. He studied at the School of American Ballet, dancing with that company in 1937 and later with American Ballet Theatre, for which he choreographed On Stage I (1945). He choreographed many Broadway musicals, including four that won successive Tony Awards: Guys and Dolls (1951), Can-Can (1953), Li'l Abner (1956), and Destry Rides Again (1959). His film credits include The Bandwagon (1953), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), and Hello, Dolly! (1969)
Michael Latham Powell
born Sept. 30, 1905, Bekesbourne, Kent, Eng. died Feb. 19, 1990, Avening, Gloucestershire British film director. He directed his first movie, Two Crowded Hours, in 1931 and made over 20 low-budget films before Alexander Korda teamed him with screenwriter Emeric Pressburger (1902-88) to make the successful U-Boat 29 (1939). Forming their own production company, they made movies such as The Thief of Bagdad (1940), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), Stairway to Heaven (1946), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). Powell made the controversial Peeping Tom (1960) without Pressburger. Powell's films were notable for their use of brilliant colour, fantasy, and experimental cinematography
Michael Manley
born Dec. 10, 1924, St. Andrew, Jam. died March 6, 1997, Kingston Jamaican political leader. Son of a prime minister of Jamaica and a sculptor, Manley was a leader of the People's National Party and the National Worker's Union before becoming prime minister in 1972. His leftist government made significant improvements in housing, education, and health care, but a dramatic rise in oil prices precipitated an economic crisis. Much of the middle class fled the country, unemployment rose to 30%, and violence broke out in the run-up to the 1980 election, in which he was defeated. He was reelected in 1989, this time as a moderate; he stepped down in 1992 for health reasons
Michael Mansfield
known as Mike Mansfield born March 16, 1903, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 5, 2001, Washington, D.C. U.S. politician who was the longest-serving majority leader (1961-77) in the U.S. Senate. He worked in Montana copper mines and later taught history at Montana State University. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1943 to 1953 and in the Senate from 1953 to 1977. An outspoken critic of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, he sponsored a 1971 bill calling for a cease-fire and phased withdrawal. He was a persistent critic of Pres. Richard Nixon, especially during the Watergate scandal. After retiring, he served as U.S. ambassador to Japan (1977-88)
Michael Moore
(born 1954) United States film producer commentator and comedian
Michael Norman Manley
born Dec. 10, 1924, St. Andrew, Jam. died March 6, 1997, Kingston Jamaican political leader. Son of a prime minister of Jamaica and a sculptor, Manley was a leader of the People's National Party and the National Worker's Union before becoming prime minister in 1972. His leftist government made significant improvements in housing, education, and health care, but a dramatic rise in oil prices precipitated an economic crisis. Much of the middle class fled the country, unemployment rose to 30%, and violence broke out in the run-up to the 1980 election, in which he was defeated. He was reelected in 1989, this time as a moderate; he stepped down in 1992 for health reasons
Michael Ondaatje
{i} (born 1943 in Sri Lanka) Canadian writer, author of the novel "The English Patient
Michael Ondaatje
born Sept. 12, 1943, Colombo, Ceylon Sri Lankan-born Canadian novelist and poet. He immigrated to Montreal at age 19 and attended the University of Toronto and Queen's University. His fascination with the American West led to one of his most celebrated works, the pastiche The Collected Works of Billy the Kid (1970). His novel The English Patient (1992, Booker Prize; film, 1996) won him international recognition; it was followed by Anil's Ghost (2000). His musical poetry and prose are a blend of myth, history, jazz, memoirs, and other forms
Michael Pacher
born 1435, County of Tirol died August 1498, Salzburg?, Archbishopric of Salzburg Austrian painter and sculptor. His colossal altarpiece for the Pilgrimage Church of St. Wolfgang in Upper Austria (1479-81) is a masterpiece of late Gothic painting, sculpture, and architecture. The painted panels, with their deep architectural perspective and dramatic foreshortening, indicate a knowledge of Andrea Mantegna. The sculptural portions, with their intricate detail, bright polychrome, and sweeping draperies, show his attachment to northern traditions; and the architectural elements show an extravagant version of the late Gothic style. Pacher was one of the earliest artists to introduce the principles of Renaissance painting into German-speaking regions
Michael Powell
(1905-1990), a British film director, who made most of his important films with the Hungarian-born director Emeric Pressburger (1902-1988). They included The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), A Matter of Life and Death (1946), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Battle of the River Plate (1956). Powell also directed Peeping Tom (1960), the controversial film of a murderer who filmed his victims as he killed them. born Sept. 30, 1905, Bekesbourne, Kent, Eng. died Feb. 19, 1990, Avening, Gloucestershire British film director. He directed his first movie, Two Crowded Hours, in 1931 and made over 20 low-budget films before Alexander Korda teamed him with screenwriter Emeric Pressburger (1902-88) to make the successful U-Boat 29 (1939). Forming their own production company, they made movies such as The Thief of Bagdad (1940), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), Stairway to Heaven (1946), Black Narcissus (1947), The Red Shoes (1948), and The Tales of Hoffmann (1951). Powell made the controversial Peeping Tom (1960) without Pressburger. Powell's films were notable for their use of brilliant colour, fantasy, and experimental cinematography
Michael R. Milken
born July 4, 1946, Encino, Calif., U.S. U.S. financier and entrepreneur. He studied at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and went to work in 1969 for what was to become Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc., an investment-banking company. In 1971 he became head of its bond-trading department. He persuaded many of his clients to invest in junk bonds issued by new or financially troubled companies; the capital he raised financed a new class of "corporate raiders" who carried out numerous mergers, acquisitions, hostile takeovers, and leveraged buyouts in the 1980s. By the end of the decade, the junk-bond market was worth $150 billion, and Drexel was a leading financial firm. In 1986 its client Ivan Boesky, convicted of insider trading, implicated Milken and the firm in his dealings. Charged with securities fraud and heavily fined, Drexel declared bankruptcy in 1990 when the junk-bond market collapsed. Milken pled guilty to securities fraud the same year and was sentenced to 10 years in prison and a $600-million fine; released after 22 months, he since made a second fortune
Michael Servetus
orig. Miguel Servet born 1511?, Villanueva or Tudela, Spain died Oct. 27, 1553, Champel, Switz. Spanish physician and theologian. His views alienated both Roman Catholics and Protestants, beginning with the publication of his first book, De Trinitatis erroribus (1531), in which he denied the Holy Trinity. His most important work, Biblia sacra ex Santis Pagnini translatione (1542), was notable for its theory of prophecy. Elsewhere he questioned the usefulness of baptism and criticized the promulgation of the Nicene Creed. Persecuted by John Calvin, he was convicted of heresy in Geneva and burned at the stake. His notable contribution to medicine was the first accurate description of cardiopulmonary circulation of the blood (1553)
Michael Thonet
born July 2, 1796, Boppard, Trier died March 3, 1871, Vienna, Austria German Austrian pioneer in the industrialization of furniture manufacture. He developed a system of steam-bent veneers 1830 and created light, curvilinear chairs. By 1856 he had perfected the bending of solid beechwood with heat and began mass production of bentwood furniture. He set up factories in Hungary and Moravia and opened salons from Moscow to Chicago. By 1870 he was producing furniture in hitherto unheard-of quantities. His furniture is still being manufactured today
Michael VIII Palaeologus
born 1224 or 1225 died Dec. 11, 1282, Thrace Nicaean emperor (1259-61) and Byzantine emperor (1261-82), founder of the Palaeologan dynasty. Appointed regent for the six-year-old son of Theodore II (1258), he seized the throne and blinded the rightful heir. He recovered Constantinople from the Latins (1261) and allied with the pope against his rivals, briefly reuniting Greek and Roman churches in 1274 (see Councils of Lyon). In 1281 the new pope, Martin IV, excommunicated him and declared Charles of Anjou's planned campaign against Byzantium to be a holy Crusade against the schismatic Greeks. The Sicilian Vespers prevented Charles's expedition and thus saved Byzantium from a second occupation by the Latins
Michael Ventris
v. born July 12, 1922, Wheathampstead, Hertfordshire, Eng. died Sept. 6, 1956, near Hatfield, Hertfordshire British architect and cryptographer. At age 14 he heard a lecture on the continuing mystery of Linear B script (see Linear A and Linear B) and resolved to decipher it. In 1952 he determined that Linear B was Greek in its oldest known form, dating from 1400-1200 BC. He collaborated with John Chadwick (1920-98) on Documents in Mycenaean Greek (1956), published a few weeks after his own death in an auto accident
Michael von Faulhaber
born March 5, 1869, Heidenfeld, Bavaria died June 12, 1952, Munich, W.Ger. German religious leader and prominent opponent of the Nazis. Ordained in 1892, he was bishop of Speyer before becoming cardinal and Munich's archbishop. In 1923 he contributed to the failure of Adolf Hitler's Beer Hall Putsch. During the Nazi regime he delivered the famous sermons later published as Judaism, Christianity, and Germany (1934), which emphasized the Jewish background of Christianity and asserted that Christian values were fundamental to German culture. Despite attempts on his life, he vigorously criticized Nazism in his sermons until the collapse of the Third Reich. After the war he received West Germany's highest award, the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit
extract the Michael
to take the mickey
take the Michael
alternative form of take the mickey, usually considered more polite
A. Michael Spence
born 1943, Montclair, N.J., U.S. U.S. economist. He studied at Yale (B.A., 1966), Oxford (B.A./M.A., 1968), and Harvard (Ph.D., 1972) and taught at Harvard and Stanford, serving as dean of the latter's business school from 1990 to 1999. He is known for refining the theory of asymmetric information in the marketplace. His research demonstrated that in certain situations those who are better informed can improve their market return by transmitting information to those who know less; for example, auto dealers can convey the superior quality of their cars by offering warranties. For his work on "market signaling," Spence shared the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with George A. Akerlof and Joseph E. Stiglitz
Charles Michael Schwab
born Feb. 18, 1862, Williamsburg, Pa., U.S. died Sept. 18, 1939, New York, N.Y. U.S. entrepreneur and steel-industry pioneer. He joined Andrew Carnegie's steelworks at Braddock, Pa., as a labourer and rose swiftly in the Carnegie empire. In 1892 Carnegie delegated to Schwab the task of returning the plant in Homestead, Pa., to normal production after the bloody Homestead Strike. His success in improving labour relations and increasing production led to his appointment as president of Carnegie Steel Co. in 1897 at the age of
Charles Michael Schwab
Schwab proposed the merger of the competing steel companies that would create the U.S. Steel Corp., and he became its first president in 1901. He resigned in 1903 to devote himself to the Bethlehem Steel Corp., which he built into one of the nation's largest steel producers of its time
Conrad Michael Richter
born Oct. 13, 1890, Pine Grove, Pa., U.S. died Oct. 30, 1968, Pottsville, Pa. U.S. short-story writer and novelist. He began as an editor and reporter and founded a juvenile magazine before moving to New Mexico in 1928. He became fascinated with U.S. history and spent years researching frontier life. He is best known for The Sea of Grass (1936), an epic on the settling of the Southwest, and for his trilogy of pioneer life, The Trees (1940), The Fields (1946), and The Town (1950, Pulitzer Prize). The Waters of Kronos (1960, National Book Award) is an autobiographical novel
George Michael Cohan
born July 3, 1878, Providence, R.I., U.S. died Nov. 5, 1942, New York, N.Y. U.S. actor, songwriter, playwright, and producer. Cohan with his parents and sister performed in vaudeville as The Four Cohans. He began writing for the New York stage in the early 1900s; his musical Little Johnny Jones (1904; film, 1930) included the classics "Give My Regards to Broadway" and "Yankee Doodle Dandy." Among his later productions were The Governor's Son (1901), The Talk of New York (1907), Broadway Jones (1912), Seven Keys to Baldpate (1913), and American Born (1925). He later appeared in shows such as Ah, Wilderness! (1933) and I'd Rather Be Right (1937). His best-known songs include "You're a Grand Old Flag," "Mary's a Grand Old Name," and the famous World War I recruiting song "Over There," for which he was awarded a special Congressional medal in 1940. Cohan was the subject of the film Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) and the musical George M! (1968)
J Michael Bishop
born Feb. 22, 1936, York, Pa., U.S. U.S. virologist. He graduated from Harvard Medical School. In 1970 he and Harold Varmus tested the theory that healthy body cells contain oncogenes (cancer-causing genes). Further research showed that such genes can cause cancer even without viral involvement. By 1989, the year Bishop and Varmus shared a Nobel Prize for their research, scientists had identified more than 40 oncogenes in animals
James Michael Curley
born Nov. 20, 1874, Boston, Mass., U.S. died Nov. 12, 1958, Boston U.S. politician. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1911-14). As Boston's mayor (1914-18, 1922-26, 1930-34, 1947-50), he dominated the city's politics for 50 years. He owed much of his success to serving the needs of Irish immigrants in exchange for votes. He centralized the powers of patronage in his own hands and distributed public works jobs so as to retain the loyalty and support of his working-class electoral base. As mayor, he brought the city close to bankruptcy by spending enormous sums on parks and hospitals to satisfy his various constituencies. Unable to win a seat in the Massachusetts delegation to the 1932 Democratic convention, Curley contrived by means he never explained to be elected a delegate from Puerto Rico. As governor of Massachusetts (1935-37), he spent New Deal funds lavishly on roads, bridges, and other public works programs. He won a seat in the House of Representatives in 1942 and was reelected two years later. His last mayoral term included five months in prison following a conviction for mail fraud; Pres. Harry Truman secured his release and later granted him a full pardon. His colourful career inspired Edwin O'Connor's novel The Last Hurrah (1956). His autobiography, I'd Do It Again, was published in 1957
John Michael Bishop
born Feb. 22, 1936, York, Pa., U.S. U.S. virologist. He graduated from Harvard Medical School. In 1970 he and Harold Varmus tested the theory that healthy body cells contain oncogenes (cancer-causing genes). Further research showed that such genes can cause cancer even without viral involvement. By 1989, the year Bishop and Varmus shared a Nobel Prize for their research, scientists had identified more than 40 oncogenes in animals
John Michael Coetzee
born Feb. 9, 1940, Cape Town, S.Af. South African novelist. Coetzee taught English at the University of Cape Town, translated works from the Dutch, and wrote literary criticism before publishing his first book, Dusklands (1974). He won international fame with In the Heart of the Country (1977) and Waiting for the Barbarians (1980), in which he attacked the legacy of colonialism; they were followed by The Life and Times of Michael K (1983, Booker Prize), which concerns a man of limited intelligence caught in a civil war; Foe (1986), a twist on Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe; the autobiographical Boyhood (1997); and others. Among his nonfiction works are Giving Offense: Essays on Censorship (1996) and The Lives of Animals (1999). In 1999 he became the first writer to win the Booker Prize twice when he received the award for his novel Disgrace (1999). In 2003 Coetzee won the Nobel Prize for Literature
Maagan Michael
Kibbutz located on the Israeli coast just south of Haifa
Philip Michael Ondaatje
born Sept. 12, 1943, Colombo, Ceylon Sri Lankan-born Canadian novelist and poet. He immigrated to Montreal at age 19 and attended the University of Toronto and Queen's University. His fascination with the American West led to one of his most celebrated works, the pastiche The Collected Works of Billy the Kid (1970). His novel The English Patient (1992, Booker Prize; film, 1996) won him international recognition; it was followed by Anil's Ghost (2000). His musical poetry and prose are a blend of myth, history, jazz, memoirs, and other forms
Sir Michael A E Dummett
born June 27, 1925, London, Eng. British philosopher. Dummett has done influential work in the philosophy of language, metaphysics, logic, and the philosophy of mathematics; he is also one of the foremost expositors of the work of Gottlob Frege. He is known chiefly for his defense of antirealism (see realism) and his attempt to explicate sentence meaning in terms of "assertibility conditions" rather than truth conditions. His major works include Frege: Philosophy of Language (1973), Truth and Other Enigmas (1978), The Logical Basis of Metaphysics (1991), and The Seas of Language (1993)
Sir Michael Anthony Eardley Dummett
born June 27, 1925, London, Eng. British philosopher. Dummett has done influential work in the philosophy of language, metaphysics, logic, and the philosophy of mathematics; he is also one of the foremost expositors of the work of Gottlob Frege. He is known chiefly for his defense of antirealism (see realism) and his attempt to explicate sentence meaning in terms of "assertibility conditions" rather than truth conditions. His major works include Frege: Philosophy of Language (1973), Truth and Other Enigmas (1978), The Logical Basis of Metaphysics (1991), and The Seas of Language (1993)
Sir Michael Kemp Tippett
born Jan. 2, 1905, London, Eng. died Jan. 8, 1998, London British composer. Tippett studied composition (1923-28) at the Royal College of Music. His early music was conservative, but in the late 1930s he developed a personal, modernistic idiom that was marked by rhapsodic lyricism, intricate counterpoint, and polyphonic rhythms that have a lilting, bounding quality. He devoted most of his energies to compositions with words (generally his own), including the cantatas A Child of Our Time (1941) and The Mask of Time (1984), and the operas The Midsummer Marriage (1952), King Priam (1961), The Knot Garden (1969), and The Ice Break (1976). Beginning with King Priam, his surging rhythms and lush harmonies gave way to a starker, more taut style. His instrumental works include symphonies and string quartets
Sir Michael Redgrave
born March 20, 1908, Bristol, Gloucestershire, Eng. died March 21, 1985, Denham, Buckinghamshire British actor. He made his stage debut in 1934 and acted with the Old Vic and the National Theatre in classic roles from William Shakespeare, Henrik Ibsen, and Anton Chekhov and in modern works such as Family Reunion (1939) and Tiger at the Gate (1955). Noted for his refined good looks and expressive voice, he began his film career in The Lady Vanishes (1938) and continued with roles in Dead of Night (1945), Mourning Becomes Electra (1947), and The Browning Version (1951)
Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave
born March 20, 1908, Bristol, Gloucestershire, Eng. died March 21, 1985, Denham, Buckinghamshire British actor. He made his stage debut in 1934 and acted with the Old Vic and the National Theatre in classic roles from William Shakespeare, Henrik Ibsen, and Anton Chekhov and in modern works such as Family Reunion (1939) and Tiger at the Gate (1955). Noted for his refined good looks and expressive voice, he began his film career in The Lady Vanishes (1938) and continued with roles in Dead of Night (1945), Mourning Becomes Electra (1947), and The Browning Version (1951)
Sir Michael Tippett
an English composer who wrote classical music for both voices and instruments. He also wrote several operas and his works include A Child of Our Time (1905-98). born Jan. 2, 1905, London, Eng. died Jan. 8, 1998, London British composer. Tippett studied composition (1923-28) at the Royal College of Music. His early music was conservative, but in the late 1930s he developed a personal, modernistic idiom that was marked by rhapsodic lyricism, intricate counterpoint, and polyphonic rhythms that have a lilting, bounding quality. He devoted most of his energies to compositions with words (generally his own), including the cantatas A Child of Our Time (1941) and The Mask of Time (1984), and the operas The Midsummer Marriage (1952), King Priam (1961), The Knot Garden (1969), and The Ice Break (1976). Beginning with King Priam, his surging rhythms and lush harmonies gave way to a starker, more taut style. His instrumental works include symphonies and string quartets
Timothy Michael Healy
born May 17, 1855, Bantry, County Cork, Ire. died March 26, 1931, Dublin Irish political leader. Soon after he entered Parliament in 1880, the "Healy Clause" of the Land Act of 1881, protecting tenant farmers' agrarian improvements from rent increases, made him popular in Ireland. Long associated with Charles Stewart Parnell, he broke with him in 1886. He grew dissatisfied with both the Liberals and the Irish Nationalists in the wake of the 1916 Easter Rising, and after 1917 he supported Sinn Féin. He was supported by both the British and Irish ministries as governor-general (1922-28) of the new Irish Free State
William Michael Harnett
born Aug. 10, 1848, Clonakilty, Ire. died Oct. 29, 1892, New York, N.Y., U.S. Irish-born U.S. still-life painter. Brought to Philadelphia as a child, he was trained as an engraver and soon developed outstanding skill in trompe l'oeil painting. While traveling in Europe he painted his best-known work, After the Hunt (1885). In 1886 he settled in New York City. His work, popular with the public, was generally dismissed by critics. After a long period of disrepute, his works again were appreciated and sought after when mid-20th-century critics recognized Harnett's outstanding skill at abstract composition
Турецкий язык - Турецкий язык

Определение michael в Турецкий язык Турецкий язык словарь

michael faraday
Elektrik motorunu ve transformatörü bulan ingiliz fizikçi ve kimyacı
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
Mikail
baş meleklerden biri
bir erkek ismi
michael j. fox
michael j. tilki
james michael curley
james curley michael
michael

    Расстановка переносов

    mic·ha·el

    Произношение

    Этимология

    [ 'mI-k&l ] (noun.) From Hebrew מיכאל (mikhael, “who is like God?”).

    Видео

    ... And the equations were written down by James Clerk Maxwell.  Unfortunately, Michael Faraday ...
    ... My name is Michael Ernst, I'm with USA Office of US Foreign ...

    Слово дня

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