max

listen to the pronunciation of max
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
(Askeri) azami (maximum)
maksimum

İşletme sahibi kârı maksimuma çıkarmak istiyor. - The business owner wants to maximize profit.

Kategori 5 bir kasırga maksimum hasara neden olur. - A category 5 hurricane causes maximum damage.

azami

100 kiloluk bir yük azamidir. - A load of 100 kilograms is the max.

{k} maximum
en fazla

En fazla 100 dolar harcayabilirsiniz. - You may spend a maximum of 100 dollars.

Otobüs en fazla kırk kişi taşıyabilir. - The bus can carry a maximum of forty people.

max out
1. (max something ↔ out) Para, kredi gibi bir şeyi bitene dek harcamak.2. (max out on) Haddi aşmak; çok yemek; fazlasıyla içmek vs
max out
Bir şeyde en üst sınıra ulaşmak

I have maxed out two of credits cards on things like vacations, cars and expensive restaurants.

max out
En üst sınıra ulaşmak.- İ maxed out on all my credit cards"
max out on
Bkz. max out
max something out
Bkz. max out
max battery
Tam Dolu Pil
max resolution
(Bilgisayar) en yüksek çözünürlük
max resolution
(Bilgisayar) en büyük çözünürlük
max width
(Bilgisayar) en fazla genişlik
custom max
(Bilgisayar) özel en büyük
edit max
(Bilgisayar) en yüksek değeri düzenler
grand max
(Bilgisayar) genel en büyük
connection max
(Bilgisayar) en çok bağlantı sayısı
de max
(Askeri) azami sapma (sürüklenme) hatası (maximum drift error)
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
A male given name

Since it seems to me that this fad of child-rearing has turned into an actual trend, that babies are an increasingly popular accessory for people-on-the-go, I first want to say to stop naming your boys Max. Max is a perfectly nice name, ensuring its owner a certain precocious sensibility, but there are enough Maxes now. Any more Maxes and the breed will go to the dogs.

short form of maximum
With "out", to reach the limit, to reach the maximum

He maxed out his credit cards to get his business started.

given name, male
{i} male first name
Musical Application using XML
A built in mathematical function in SQL and Access that determines the maximum value of an attribute in a query or table
Midwest Exchange Automated Execution System
Max. is an abbreviation for maximum, and is often used after numbers or amounts. I'll give him eight out of 10, max. maximum. adj. Beckmann Max Bill Max Born Max Bruch Max Karl August Delbrück Max Ernst Max Fleischer Max and Dave Frisch Max Rudolf Horkheimer Max Klinger Max Laue Max Theodor Felix von Liebermann Max Ophüls Max Max Oppenheimer Perutz Max Ferdinand Planck Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Reinhardt Max Max Goldmann Scheler Max Sydow Max von Weber Max Wertheimer Max
An abbreviation for the maximum time for which the flight of a free-flight aircraft is recorded, typically three minutes
Maximum effort for one repetition of an exercise
= The largest hourly rate reported for this occupation
street names for gamma hydroxybutyrate
Maximum
{i} maximum, greatest quantity
Max source code file
The Mid-Atlantic Cross Roads network consortium, sponsored by SURA, and pioneered by GW
{f} reach the highest limit; reach the point at which there can be no further increase or growth (Slang)
{s} highest, most
Returns the larger of the two integers
Maximum (worst-case) timing model Corresponds to maximum temperature, worst-case process (-3 sigma model), and minimum voltage (TI*)
max out
To use (something) to the limit of its capabilities

I've spent all afternoon shopping and maxed out my credit card.

max out
To reach a maximum or a point at which no more growth or improvement is possible
max out
To reach the limit of one's capabilities
max out
1. (max something ↔ out) Use something such as money or supplies so that there is none left.2. (max out on) Do too much, eat too much etc

1. I maxed out my Visa. 2. ‘Want a beer?’ ‘Nah, I maxed out on booze this weekend.’.

max out
Reach a maximum."I maxed out on all my credit cards"
max out
Reach one's maximum in something, such as weight in weight lifting or credit on a credit card

Andy finally maxed out at 300 pounds. Randy just knew when he had maxed out. Something in his body told him to stop.

Max Beckmann
born Feb. 12, 1884, Leipzig, Ger. died Dec. 27, 1950, New York, N.Y., U.S. German Expressionist painter and graphic artist. After training at the conservative Weimar Academy, in 1903 he moved to Berlin and joined the Berlin Sezession. His experience as a medical orderly in World War I changed his outlook, and his work became full of horrifying imagery, with deliberately repulsive colours and erratic forms. He considered his work to be a combination of brutal realism and social commentary. In 1933 the Nazis declared his art "degenerate" and forced him to resign his professorship at the Städel School of Art in Frankfurt. In 1937 he fled to Amsterdam, and in 1947 he moved to the U.S., where he taught in St. Louis, Mo., and New York City
Max Beckmann
{i} (1884-1950) German expressionist painter and printmaker, creator of the triptych "Departure
Max Bill
born Dec. 22, 1908, Winterthur, Switz. died Dec. 9, 1994, Berlin, Ger. Swiss painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and industrial designer. He studied architecture, metalwork, stage design, and painting at the Bauhaus. In 1930 he opened his own studio in Zürich, where he spent most of his life and earned a living designing advertisements. In the 1940s he designed chairs featuring geometric forms. He cofounded and directed the College of Design in Ulm, Ger. (1951-55), and also designed its buildings. He is best known for his advertising designs
Max Born
born Dec. 11, 1882, Breslau, Ger. died Jan. 5, 1970, Göttingen, W.Ger. German physicist. He taught theoretical physics at the University of Göttingen from 1921 to 1933, when he fled to Britain. There he taught principally at the University of Edinburgh (1936-53). In 1921 he gave a very precise definition of quantity of heat, the most satisfactory mathematical statement of the first law of thermodynamics. In 1926 he collaborated with his student Werner Heisenberg to develop the mathematical formulation that would adequately describe Heisenberg's first laws of a new quantum theory. He later showed, in the work for which he is perhaps best known, that the solution of the Schrödinger equation has a statistical meaning of physical significance. His later work concerned the scattering of atomic particles and calculations dealing with the electronic structures of molecules. In 1954 he shared a Nobel Prize for Physics with Walther Bothe (1891-1957)
Max Bruch
born Jan. 6, 1838, Cologne, Prussia died Oct. 2, 1920, Friedensau, near Berlin, Ger. German composer. Bruch held many conducting positions and taught for 20 years at the Berlin Academy. He was known in his lifetime principally for his many sacred and secular choral pieces, including Odysseus (1872) and Das Lied von der Glocke (1879). Today he is remembered especially for his first violin concerto (1868); he also wrote two further violin concertos, the cello variations Kol Nidrei (1881), and operas and symphonies
Max Delbruck
{i} (1906-1981) German biologist who shared the 1969 Nobel Prize (with Salvador Edward Luria and Alfred Hershey) for medicine or physiology for research on the mechanisms and materials of inheritance of viruses
Max Delbrück
born Sept. 4, 1906, Berlin, Ger. died March 9, 1981, Pasadena, Calif., U.S. German-born U.S. biologist. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Göttingen in 1930, and in 1937 he immigrated to the U.S., where he joined the California Institute of Technology faculty. In 1939 he discovered a one-step process for growing bacteriophages that would induce a phage, after an hour of inactivity, to multiply to produce several hundred thousands of progeny. In 1946 he and A.D. Hershey independently discovered that the genetic material of different kinds of viruses can combine to create new types of viruses, a process previously believed to be limited to higher, sexually reproducing forms of life. In 1969 he shared a Nobel Prize with Hershey and their colleague Salvador Luria
Max Ernst
a German painter who lived in Germany, France, and then the US. He was an important figure in Dadaism and surrealism (1891-1976). born April 2, 1891, Brühl, Ger. died April 1, 1976, Paris, Fr. German-born French painter and sculptor. He gave up studying philosophy and psychology at Bonn University for painting. After serving in World War I, he became the leader of the Dada movement in Cologne (1919), working in collage and photomontage. A characteristic work is Here Everything Is Still Floating (1920), a startlingly illogical composition made from cutout photographs of insects, fish, and anatomical drawings. In 1922 he settled in Paris and was among the founders of Surrealism. His work was imaginative and experimental; he pioneered the technique of frottage and experimented with automatism. After 1934 the irrational and whimsical imagery seen in his paintings appeared also in his sculpture. In 1941 he moved to New York City, where he joined his third wife, Peggy Guggenheim, and began collaborating with Marcel Duchamp. He returned to France in 1953 and continued to produce lyrical and abstract works
Max Ernst
(1891-1976) German surrealist painter, one of the founders of the dada movement, developer of the frottage technique
Max Ferdinand Perutz
born May 19, 1914, Vienna, Austria died Feb. 6, 2002, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Eng. Austrian-British biochemist. With John Cowdery Kendrew he founded the Medical Research Council Unit for Molecular Biology at the University of Cambridge. His discovery that hemoglobin's structure changes when it picks up or releases oxygen led to the full understanding of the molecular mechanism of respiratory oxygen transport by hemoglobin. For his X-ray diffraction analysis of hemoglobin's structure, Perutz and Kendrew shared the 1962 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Perutz also used crystallography to study the flow of glaciers
Max Frisch
born May 15, 1911, Zürich, Switz. died April 4, 1991, Zürich Swiss dramatist and novelist. Originally a journalist, he later worked as an architect, a career he abandoned for writing in 1955. He is noted for his Expressionist depictions of the moral dilemmas of 20th-century life. His early drama Santa Cruz (1947) established the central theme of his subsequent works: the predicament of the complicated, skeptical individual in modern society. Other plays include The Chinese Wall (1947), The Fire Raisers (1958), and Andorra (1961). Among his novels are I'm Not Stiller (1954), Homo Faber (1957), A Wilderness of Mirrors (1964), and Man in the Holocene (1979)
Max Horkheimer
born Feb. 14, 1895, Stuttgart, Ger. died July 7, 1973, Nürnberg German philosopher and social theorist. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Frankfurt in 1922. In 1930 he became director of the university's newly founded Institute for Social Research. Under his leadership, the institute attracted an extraordinarily talented array of philosophers and social scientists, including Theodor Adorno, Erich Fromm, and Herbert Marcuse; collectively (with Horkheimer) they became known as the Frankfurt school. When the Nazis came to power in 1933, Horkheimer moved the institute to New York City, where he directed it until 1941; he reestablished it in Frankfurt in 1950. In his 1937 essay "Traditional and Critical Theory," he contrasted what he considered the socially conformist orientation of traditional political philosophy and social science to the brand of critical Marxism favoured by the institute, an approach known as critical theory. His collaboration with Adorno, Dialectic of Enlightenment (1947), is a pessimistic work that traces the origins of fascism and other forms of totalitarianism to the Enlightenment concept of "instrumental" reason
Max Karl August Bruch
born Jan. 6, 1838, Cologne, Prussia died Oct. 2, 1920, Friedensau, near Berlin, Ger. German composer. Bruch held many conducting positions and taught for 20 years at the Berlin Academy. He was known in his lifetime principally for his many sacred and secular choral pieces, including Odysseus (1872) and Das Lied von der Glocke (1879). Today he is remembered especially for his first violin concerto (1868); he also wrote two further violin concertos, the cello variations Kol Nidrei (1881), and operas and symphonies
Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck
born April 23, 1858, Kiel, Schleswig died Oct. 4, 1947, Göttingen, W.Ger. German physicist. He studied at the Universities of Munich and Kiel, then became professor of theoretical physics at the University of Berlin (1889-1928). His work on the second law of thermodynamics and blackbody radiation led him to formulate the revolutionary quantum theory of radiation, for which he received a Nobel Prize in 1918. He also discovered the quantum of action, now known as Planck's constant, h. He championed Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity, but he opposed the indeterministic, statistical worldview introduced by Niels Bohr, Max Born, and Werner Heisenberg after the advent of quantum mechanics. As the influential president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (later the Max Planck Society) until his resignation in 1937, he appealed to Adolf Hitler to reverse his devastating racial policies. His son was later implicated in the July Plot against Hitler and was executed
Max Klinger
born Feb. 18, 1857, Leipzig, Ger. died July 5, 1920, near Naumburg German painter, sculptor, and printmaker. He is known for his use of symbol, fantasy, and dreamlike situations, reflecting a late-19th-century awareness of psychological depths. His vivid, frequently morbid imaginings and his interest in the gruesome and grotesque can be seen in his Goyaesque etchings. He is best known for a series of pen-and-ink drawings called Series upon the Theme of Christ and Fantasies upon the Finding of a Glove, which tells a strange parable of a hapless young man and his obsessive involvement with a woman's elbow-length glove. He also created controversial treatments of religious themes. In his later years he worked primarily in sculpture. He had a deep influence on many artists, including Edvard Munch, Käthe Kollwitz, Max Ernst, and Giorgio de Chirico
Max Liebermann
born July 20, 1847, Berlin, Prussia died Feb. 8, 1935, Berlin, Ger. German painter and etcher. The realism and simplicity of his first exhibited painting, Women Plucking Geese (1872), were in striking contrast to the Romantic, idealized art then in vogue. In the summer of 1873 he lived in Barbizon, where he became acquainted with the Barbizon school of painters; as a result of their influence, he brightened his palette and helped initiate the German school of Impressionism. In the 1880s he found his subjects in the orphanages and asylums for the old in Amsterdam and among the peasants and urban labourers of Germany and The Netherlands. As a supporter of such academically unpopular styles as Impressionism and Art Nouveau, he founded the Berlin Sezession (1899) but later became president of the conservative Berlin Academy
Max Müller
{i} Friedrich Max Muller (1823-1900), British philologist and Orientalist (born in Germany) known for his research of Sanskrit language and literature
Max Nordau
{i} (1849-1923, born Simcha Meir Zeigerfeld) Hungarian born doctor and author, Zionist leader, president of the (7th-10th) Zionist Congress
Max Ophüls
orig. Max Oppenheimer born May 6, 1902, Saarbrücken, Ger. died March 26, 1957, Hamburg, W.Ger. German film director. An actor, stage director, and producer in Germany and Austria (1921-30), he gained renown as a film director with Liebelei (1933). He left Nazi Germany and directed popular but undistinguished films in France, Russia, Italy, and The Netherlands until 1940, when he moved to the U.S. In Hollywood he directed The Exile (1947), Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948), and The Reckless Moment (1949). He returned to France to make The Roundabout (1950), House of Pleasure (1952), and The Sins of Lola Montes (1955), considered his masterpiece. His son, Marcel (b. 1927), worked in France principally as a maker of documentary films, most notably The Sorrow and the Pity (1971), which examines French conduct under German occupation
Max Planck
{i} Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck (1858-1947), German physicist, father of quantum physics, winner of the 1918 Nobel prize for physics
Max Planck
a German scientist who developed the ideas on which quantum theory is based (1858-1947). born April 23, 1858, Kiel, Schleswig died Oct. 4, 1947, Göttingen, W.Ger. German physicist. He studied at the Universities of Munich and Kiel, then became professor of theoretical physics at the University of Berlin (1889-1928). His work on the second law of thermodynamics and blackbody radiation led him to formulate the revolutionary quantum theory of radiation, for which he received a Nobel Prize in 1918. He also discovered the quantum of action, now known as Planck's constant, h. He championed Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity, but he opposed the indeterministic, statistical worldview introduced by Niels Bohr, Max Born, and Werner Heisenberg after the advent of quantum mechanics. As the influential president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (later the Max Planck Society) until his resignation in 1937, he appealed to Adolf Hitler to reverse his devastating racial policies. His son was later implicated in the July Plot against Hitler and was executed
Max Reger
born March 19, 1873, Brand, Bavaria, Ger. died May 11, 1916, Leipzig German composer and organist. From 1890 to 1893 he studied at Sondershausen and Wiesbaden and taught piano, organ, and theory. By 1901, despite opposition to his traditional methods, he had established himself in Munich as a composer, pianist, and teacher. He became a prolific composer of songs, piano pieces, and especially organ music. His music, combining progressive and conservative elements and often highly chromatic, has always been more popular in Germany than elsewhere
Max Reinhardt
orig. Max Goldmann born Sept. 9, 1873, Baden, near Vienna, Austria died Oct. 31, 1943, New York, N.Y., U.S. German theatrical director. After studying drama in Vienna and acting in Salzburg, he joined Otto Brahm's company in Berlin in 1894. Reinhardt directed his first play in 1902 and managed a small theatre from 1903. He had directed more than 40 plays by 1905, when he became famous for his creative staging of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. He bought Berlin's Deutsches Theater and remodeled it with the latest innovations in scenic design and lighting. Known for the extravagant theatricality and stunning visual effects of his productions, he won much praise for his staging of the religious spectacle The Miracle (1911). In 1920 he cofounded the Salzburg Festival, where he staged Jedermann (an adaptation of Everyman) in the cathedral square. He left Germany in 1933 and eventually settled in the U.S. A major influence on 20th-century drama, he helped increase the creative authority of the director
Max Roach
{i} (born 1924) famous African American jazz drummer and outspoken civil rights advocate (recorded with other famous musicians, such as Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker)
Max Roach
born Jan. 10, 1924, New Land, N.C., U.S. U.S. jazz bandleader, composer, and drummer. Roach performed with many of the key bebop players of the mid-1940s, including Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker. He developed a light, flexible manner of keeping time with the ride cymbal rather than the bass drum, updating the role of the drum set for the new music and exploring the melodic possibilities of the drums in his solos. He formed a quintet with trumpeter Clifford Brown in 1954 and continued as leader of his own group following Brown's death in 1956
Max Rudolf
{i} (1902-1995) German born famous USA orchestra conductor
Max Rudolf Frisch
born May 15, 1911, Zürich, Switz. died April 4, 1991, Zürich Swiss dramatist and novelist. Originally a journalist, he later worked as an architect, a career he abandoned for writing in 1955. He is noted for his Expressionist depictions of the moral dilemmas of 20th-century life. His early drama Santa Cruz (1947) established the central theme of his subsequent works: the predicament of the complicated, skeptical individual in modern society. Other plays include The Chinese Wall (1947), The Fire Raisers (1958), and Andorra (1961). Among his novels are I'm Not Stiller (1954), Homo Faber (1957), A Wilderness of Mirrors (1964), and Man in the Holocene (1979)
Max Scheler
born Aug. 22, 1874, Munich, Ger. died May 19, 1928, Frankfurt am Main German philosopher. He is remembered primarily for his contributions to phenomenology. His Formalism in Ethics and Non-Formal Ethics of Values (1913-16) contains a detailed critique of the ethics of Immanuel Kant. In Man's Place in the Universe (1928), he advanced a rather grandiose metaphysical doctrine with affinities to American pragmatism: humanity, God, and world are one cosmic process, with two "poles," spirit and "life-urge"; the ideas of spirit become real through human life and history
Max Steiner
born May 10, 1888, Vienna, Austria died Dec. 28, 1971, Hollywood, Calif., U.S. Austrian-born U.S. composer and conductor. A prodigy, he wrote an operetta at age 14 that ran in Vienna for a year. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1914 and worked in New York City as a theatre conductor and arranger, and then he moved to Hollywood in 1929. He became one of the first and finest (if not subtlest) movie composers, establishing many techniques that became standard, with his scores for King Kong (1933), The Informer (1935, Academy Award), Gone with the Wind (1939), Now, Voyager (1942, Academy Award), Since You Went Away (1944, Academy Award), The Big Sleep (1946), The Fountainhead (1949), and many others
Max Theodor Felix von Laue
born Oct. 9, 1879, Pfaffendorf, near Koblenz, Ger. died April 23, 1960, Berlin, W.Ger. German physicist. He taught at the University of Berlin (1919-43). He was the first to use a crystal to diffract X rays, demonstrating that X rays are electromagnetic radiation similar to light and that the molecular structure of crystals is a regularly repeating arrangement. For his work in crystallography he received a 1914 Nobel Prize. He championed Albert Einstein's theory of relativity and studied the quantum theory, the Compton effect, and the disintegration of atoms
Max Weber
born April 21, 1864, Erfurt, Prussia died June 14, 1920, Munich, Ger. German sociologist and political economist. Son of a wealthy liberal politician and a Calvinist mother, Weber was a compulsively diligent scholar who suffered occasional nervous collapses. Insights derived from his own experience inform his most famous and controversial work, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (1904-05), which examines the relationship between Calvinist (or Puritan) morality, compulsive labour, bureaucracy, and economic success under capitalism (see Protestant ethic). Weber also wrote penetratingly on social phenomena such as charisma and mysticism, which he saw as antithetical to the modern world and its underlying process of rationalization. His efforts helped establish sociology as an academic discipline in Germany, and his work continues to stimulate scholarship. Through his insistence on the need for objectivity and his analysis of human action in terms of motivation, he profoundly influenced sociological theory. His voluminous writings, mostly published posthumously, include Economy and Society (2 vol., 1922-25) and General Economic History (1923)
Max Wertheimer
(b. April 15, 1880, Prague, Czech. d. Oct. 12, 1943, New Rochelle, N.Y., U.S.) German psychologist. He taught at the Universities of Frankfurt and Berlin (1916-29) before immigrating to the U.S. to teach at the New School for Social Research (1933-43). With Wolfgang Köhler and Kurt Koffka (1886-1941), he was instrumental in establishing Gestalt psychology. Much of his work dealt with perception, though he also explored thinking and problem solving. His Productive Thinking was published posthumously in 1945
Max and Dave Fleischer
born July 19, 1883, Vienna, Austria died Sept. 11, 1972, Woodland Hills, Calif., U.S. born July 14, 1894, New York, N.Y., U.S. died June 25, 1979, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. animators. The brothers worked as newspaper cartoonists before founding their own studio in 1921 to make animated cartoons. In the mid 1920s they produced the first sound-on-film animations. They later created and produced the popular cartoon series Betty Boop (1931-39), Popeye the Sailor (1929-42), and Superman (1941-42) and the feature-length cartoon Gulliver's Travels (1939)
Max von Laue
born Oct. 9, 1879, Pfaffendorf, near Koblenz, Ger. died April 23, 1960, Berlin, W.Ger. German physicist. He taught at the University of Berlin (1919-43). He was the first to use a crystal to diffract X rays, demonstrating that X rays are electromagnetic radiation similar to light and that the molecular structure of crystals is a regularly repeating arrangement. For his work in crystallography he received a 1914 Nobel Prize. He championed Albert Einstein's theory of relativity and studied the quantum theory, the Compton effect, and the disintegration of atoms
Max von Sydow
orig. Carl Adolf von Sydow born April 10, 1929, Lund, Swed. Swedish actor. After studying at Stockholm's Royal Dramatic Theatre School (1948-51), he became a noted stage actor in Malmö and Stockholm. He is best known for his dour, brooding characterizations in Ingmar Bergman's films, notably The Seventh Seal (1957), The Virgin Spring (1960), Winter Light (1963), Shame (1968), and The Passion of Anna (1969). His numerous U.S. and international movies include The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), The Exorcist (1973), Pelle the Conqueror (1988), What Dreams May Come (1998), and Minority Report (2002)
max out
reach the highest limit; reach the point which cannot be exceeded (Slang)
max out
reach a maximum; "I maxed out on all my credit cards
max out
reach a maximum; "I maxed out on all my credit cards"
to the max
To the maximum possible degree or extent
to the max
Big; large; taken to the extreme
to the max
To a great degree or extent; very
Friedrich Max Müller
{i} Max Muller (1823-1900), British philologist and Orientalist (born in Germany) known for his research of Sanskrit language and literature
Sir Max Beerbohm
born Aug. 24, 1872, London, Eng. died May 20, 1956, Rapallo, Italy English caricaturist, writer, and dandy. His sophisticated drawings and parodies were unique in capturing, usually without malice, whatever was pretentious, affected, or absurd in his famous and fashionable contemporaries. His first literary collection, The Works of Max Beerbohm (1896), and his first book of drawings, Caricatures of Twenty-five Gentlemen (1896), were followed by the charming fable The Happy Hypocrite (1897) and his only novel, Zuleika Dobson (1911), a burlesque of Oxford life. His story collection Seven Men (1919) is considered a masterpiece
maxed
{s} filled to capacity; at the uppermost limit of capability
maxing
present participle of max
min-max ordering
(Ticaret) A replenishment and inventory management system that sets a minimum inventory level, used to trigger a reorder when the available plus incoming receipt total is less than the min. The amount of the order is the difference between the calculated (less than min) inventory and a predefined max. Min-max systems are typically not time-phased
to the max
(Slang) to the maximum, completely, to the limit
max

    Расстановка переносов

    Max

    Турецкое произношение

    mäks

    Синонимы

    maxi

    Произношение

    /ˈmaks/ /ˈmæks/

    Этимология

    [ 'maks ] (noun.) 1968. Borrowed from the German diminutive of Maximilian in the 19th century, later also used as a nickname for Maxwell.

    Общие Словосочетания

    max out

    Слово дня

    googol
Избранное