lee

listen to the pronunciation of lee
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
An English topographic surname for someone who lived near a meadow (the Anglo-Saxon for meadow being ley or leag)
A surname of Chinese origin, a variant of Li (See: 李)
A female given name popular in conjoined names such as Lee Ann or Mary Lee
Any of various place names, including a river in England, and a river in Co. Cork, Ireland
A male given name derived from the surname, or a nickname for names such as Leo and Leroy
A protected cove or harbor, out of the wind
The side of the ship away from the wind
{n} the side or part opposit to the wind
{n} ground inclosed, a lawn, yarn
A river in Co. Cork, Ireland
An English topographic surname for someone who lived near a meadow
Various place names
{i} male and female first name; family name; manufacturer of blue jeans (headquarters in Kansas, USA)
derived from the surname,or a nickname for names such as Leo and Leroy
A surname of Chinese origin, a variant of Li (See: 李)
popular in conjoined names such as Lee Ann or Mary Lee
Side of a slope that is opposite to the direction of flow of ice, wind, or water Opposite of stoss
United States striptease artist who became famous on Broadway in the 1930s (1914-1970)
The side of the boat away from the wind
The side of an object that is sheltered from the wind
leader of the American Revolution who proposed the resolution calling for independence of the American colonies (1732-1794)
American general who led the Confederate armies in the American Civil War (1807-1870)
The downwind side; the direction or side towards which the wind is blowing The lee side of a boat is sheltered from the wind by the hull of the boat; likewise, the lee of an island is sheltered from the wind A lee shore is the one the wind blows onto or towards To run to the lee is to sail downwind, towards the lee shore See windward
The lee of a place is the shelter that it gives from the wind or bad weather. the cathedral, which nestles in the lee of a hill beneath the town
Under the lee of the land Under the shelter of the cliffs which break the force of the winds (Anglo-Saxon, hleo, a shelter ) Under the lee of a ship On the side opposite to the wind, so that the ship shelters or wards it off To lay a ship by the lee, or, in modern nautical phraseology, to heave-to, is to arrange the sails of a ship so that they may lie flat against the masts and shrouds, that the wind may strike the vessel broadside so that she will make little or no headway
That part of the hemisphere, as one stands on shipboard, toward which the wind blows
The side of a ship or island away from the wind direction
Side of the ship away from the wind
United States filmmaker whose works explore the richness of Black culture in America (born in 1957)
United States actor who was an expert in kung fu and starred in martial arts films (1941-1973)
That which settles at the bottom, as of a cask of liquor esp
wine; sediment; dregs; used now only in the plural
United States physicist (born in China) who collaborated with Yang Chen Ning in disproving the principle of conservation of parity (born in 1926)
Direction toward which the wind blows
1 The sheltered side of land away from the wind, not to be confused with the leeward shore 2 The side away from the wind on a ship
the side of a ship, promontory, or other object away from the wind; that side sheltered from the wind It is the opposite side to windward
Of or pertaining to the part or side opposite to that against which the wind blows; opposed to weather; as, the lee side or lee rail of a vessel
labor and equipment estimates
In sailing, the lee side of a ship is the one that is away from the wind. British religious leader and founder (1776) of the Shakers in America. British-born American Revolutionary general whose performance at the Battle of Monmouth (1778), when he ordered a retreat instead of attacking, brought about his court-martial and dismissal. American burlesque entertainer who also wrote best-selling mystery novels, including The G-String Murders (1941). American Revolutionary politician and soldier. He served in the Virginia legislature (1785-1788 and 1789-1791) and as governor of Virginia (1792-1795). Singaporean lawyer. Upon negotiating Singapore's independence from Great Britain, he became the republic's first prime minister (1959-1990). American writer. Her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960), dealing with racial injustice in the South, won a Pulitzer Prize. American Revolutionary leader who proposed the resolution calling for the independence of the American colonies from England (1776). American Confederate general in the Civil War. He won victories at Bull Run (1862), Fredericksburg (1862), and Chancellorsville (1863) before surrendering to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox (1865). American director, screenwriter, and actor whose films, including Do the Right Thing (1989) and Malcom X (1992), explore American racism. Bench Johnny Lee Berners Lee Tim Chennault Claire Lee De Forest Lee Frost Robert Lee Glashow Sheldon Lee Robert Lee Hayes Iacocca Lee Krasner Lee Lee Kuan Yew Lee Teng hui Lee Ann Lee Bruce Lee Yuen Kam Lee Gypsy Rose Lee Harper Lee Henry Lee Ivy Ledbetter Lee Peggy Lee Richard Henry Lee Robert Edward Lee Spike Shelton Jackson Lee Lee William Lewis Jerry Lee Masters Edgar Lee Minsky Marvin Lee Archibald Lee Wright Oswald Lee Harvey Pike Kenneth Lee Rice Jerry Lee William Lee Shoemaker Strasberg Lee Thorndike Edward Lee Trevino Lee Buck Ruth Lee Jones Washington and Lee University Whorf Benjamin Lee Manfred Bennington Lee
the side or part that is sheltered or turned away from the wind
a place protected from the wind by some object; the side sheltered from the wind; shelter; protection; as, the lee of a mountain, an island, or a ship
(Leeward) - Direction the wind is blowing relative to the ship The side of the ship opposite that of which the wind is coming from is known as the Lee side
To lie; to speak falsely
A place where vessels are protected from the full force of the wind These include inland rivers and lakes, !leeward coasts, sheltered bays, and most ports
See Lee, a
{s} of the side which is sheltered from the wind (Nautical)
towards the side away from the wind
{i} shelter; side protected from the wind, side opposite the wind (Nautical)
soldier of the American Revolution (1756-1818)
– A sheltered place; the side or direction away from the wind
the side of something that is sheltered from the wind
The side opposite to that from which the wind blows
A sheltered place; esp
the side of something that is sheltered from the wind American general who led the Confederate armies in the American Civil War (1807-1870) soldier of the American Revolution (1756-1818) leader of the American Revolution who proposed the resolution calling for independence of the American colonies (1732-1794) United States physicist (born in China) who collaborated with Yang Chen Ning in disproving the principle of conservation of parity (born in 1926) United States actor who was an expert in kung fu and starred in martial arts films (1941-1973) United States striptease artist who became famous on Broadway in the 1930s (1914-1970) United States filmmaker whose works explore the richness of Black culture in America (born in 1957)
fredericksburg
lee shore
a shore, towards which the wind is blowing, and to which there is the danger of being driven
Lee Buck Trevino
born Dec. 1, 1939, near Dallas, Tex., U.S. U.S. golfer. Of Mexican American descent, Trevino received a grade-school education, served in the U.S. Marine Corps, and worked as an odd-job man and assistant professional at golf courses in his native Texas. In 1967 he unexpectedly came in fifth in the U.S. Open, then won it the next year. In 1971 Trevino became the first player to win the U.S., British, and Canadian Open championships in a single year. He won the British Open in 1972 and the U.S. PGA Championship in 1974. He then underwent several back surgeries but returned to win the PGA again in 1984
Lee De Forest
born Aug. 26, 1873, Council Bluffs, Iowa, U.S. died June 30, 1961, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. inventor. He had invented many gadgets by age 13, including a working silverplating apparatus. After earning a Ph.D. from Yale University, he founded the De Forest Wireless Telegraph Co. (1902) and the De Forest Radio Telephone Co. (1907). In 1907 he patented the Audion vacuum tube detector, which allowed more sensitive reception of radio signals such as his live broadcast of a performance by Enrico Caruso (1910). He developed a sound-on-film optical-recording system called Phonofilm and demonstrated it in theatres (1923-27). A poor businessman who was twice defrauded by business partners, he eventually sold his patents at low prices to such firms as American Telephone & Telegraph Co., which profited highly from their commercial development. Though embittered, he was widely honoured as the father of radio and the grandfather of television
Lee Glashow
{i} Sheldon Lee Glashow (born 1932) American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1979 together with Steven Weinberg and Abdus Salam
Lee Harvey Oswald
(1939-1963) Marxist sympathizer and member of the U.S. Marine Corps, assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy
Lee Harvey Oswald
the man who was believed by the police to have shot and killed the US President John F. Kennedy in 1963. Two days after the President's death, Oswald was shot and killed by Jack Ruby. Some people believe that Oswald was not the real killer (1939-63). born Oct. 18, 1939, New Orleans, La., U.S. died Nov. 24, 1963, Dallas, Texas Accused assassin of Pres. John F. Kennedy. While serving in the U.S. Marines (1956-59) he began to express pro-Soviet and politically radical views. Shortly after his discharge he moved to the Soviet Union, where he unsuccessfully tried to become a Soviet citizen. He returned to the U.S. in 1962 with his Russian wife and daughter but retained his radical political beliefs. In April 1963 he allegedly shot at but missed Edwin Walker, an ultrarightist retired general. In October he took a job at the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas. On Nov. 22, 1963, from a window on its sixth floor, he allegedly fired three shots that killed Kennedy and wounded Gov. John B. Connally while the two men were riding in the president's motorcade. Oswald killed a patrolman who had detained him, but he was soon captured and arraigned. On November 24, while being transferred to an interrogation office, he was fatally shot by Jack Ruby, a nightclub owner
Lee Iacocca
which was very popular (1924- ) a US businessman who was president of the Ford car company and later greatly increased the profits made by the Chrysler car company after a period when it had not been very successful. He also wrote an autobiography (=the story of his own life). orig. Lido Anthony Iacocca born Oct. 15, 1924, Allentown, Pa., U.S. U.S. automobile executive. He was hired as an engineer by Ford Motor Co. but soon moved to its sales department and was noted for his successful promotion of the sporty yet inexpensive Mustang. He rose rapidly, becoming president of Ford in 1970. His brash manner led to his dismissal by Henry Ford II in 1978. A year later he was hired by the nearly bankrupt Chrysler Corp. He persuaded Congress to lend Chrysler $1.5 billion in 1980 and carried out layoffs, wage cuts, and plant closings to make the company more efficient. He also shifted the company's emphasis to more fuel-efficient cars and embarked on an aggressive advertising campaign. Within a few years Chrysler was showing record profits, and Iacocca was a national celebrity with a best-selling autobiography, Iacocca (1984). He retired in 1992
Lee Iacocca
former American executive of the automobile industry (served as President of Ford Motor Co. and CEO of Chrysler Corp.)
Lee Krasner
orig. Lenore Krassner born Oct. 27, 1908, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died June 19, 1984, New York, N.Y. U.S. painter. Born to Russian immigrants, in 1937 she began to study with the painter Hans Hofmann, who exposed her to the work of Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. Synthesizing these European influences, Krasner developed her own style of geometric abstraction, which she grounded in floral motifs and rhythmic gesture. In 1940 she began exhibiting her work with that of other American artists who became known as Abstract Expressionists. After her 1945 marriage to painter Jackson Pollock, Krasner and Pollock both produced a large body of work, each under the other's influence. Krasner continued to paint throughout the 1970s
Lee Kuan Yew
born Sept. 16, 1923, Singapore Prime minister of Singapore (1959-90). Born to a wealthy Chinese family, Lee studied at the University of Cambridge and became a lawyer and a socialist. He worked as a legal adviser to labour unions and won election to Singapore's legislative council in 1955, while the country was still a British crown colony. He helped Singapore achieve self-government and, running as an anticolonialist and anticommunist, was elected prime minister in 1959. His numerous reforms included the emancipation of women. He briefly entered Singapore in the Federation of Malaysia (1963-65); on its withdrawal, Singapore became a sovereign state. Lee industrialized the country and made Singapore the most prosperous nation in Southeast Asia. He achieved both labour peace and a rising standard of living for workers, though his mildly authoritarian government at times infringed on civil liberties
Lee Raymond
Chairman and CEO of the Exxon Corporation
Lee Strasberg
a US teacher of acting and theatre director who was the first person in the US to use and develop the ideas about acting, called method acting, that were invented by Constantin Stanislavsky. From 1948 to 1982 he was in charge of the Actor's Studio in New York City (1901-82). orig. Israel Strassberg born Nov. 17, 1901, Budzanów, Pol., Austria-Hungary died Feb. 17, 1982, New York, N.Y., U.S. Russian-born U.S. theatre director and teacher. At age seven he immigrated to New York City with his family. After acting lessons with teachers who had studied under Konstantin Stanislavsky, he became an actor and stage manager with the Theatre Guild. In 1931 he cofounded the Group Theatre, where he directed brilliant experimental plays such as Men in White (1933). After working in Hollywood (1941-48), he returned to New York City to become artistic director of the Actors Studio, where he expanded Stanislavsky's teachings to further develop method acting, in which actors use their own emotional memory for the purpose of dramatic motivation. He trained actors such as Marlon Brando, Marilyn Monroe, Dustin Hoffman, Geraldine Page, and Julie Harris
Lee Teng-hui
born Jan. 15, 1923, near Tan-shui, Taiwan First Taiwan-born president (1988-2000) of Taiwan (Republic of China). He became president in 1988 after the death of Chiang Ching-kuo. He was reelected in 1990 and won a landslide victory in 1996 in Taiwan's first direct presidential election. Lee favoured a policy of "flexible diplomacy" in dealing with the People's Republic of China. His successor, Chen Shui-bian (Ch'en Shui-pian) was the first president not from the Nationalist Party
Lee Trevino
born Dec. 1, 1939, near Dallas, Tex., U.S. U.S. golfer. Of Mexican American descent, Trevino received a grade-school education, served in the U.S. Marine Corps, and worked as an odd-job man and assistant professional at golf courses in his native Texas. In 1967 he unexpectedly came in fifth in the U.S. Open, then won it the next year. In 1971 Trevino became the first player to win the U.S., British, and Canadian Open championships in a single year. He won the British Open in 1972 and the U.S. PGA Championship in 1974. He then underwent several back surgeries but returned to win the PGA again in 1984
Lee's Summit
A city of western Missouri southeast of Kansas City. It is a manufacturing center within the Kansas City metropolitan area. Population: 46,418
Lee-Enfield
a type of rifle (=long gun) used by the British army in World Wars I and II
lee shore
A shore toward which the wind blows and toward which a ship is likely to be driven
lee side
leeward, side protected from the wind, side opposite the wind (Nautical)
Rosy Lee
Tea (the drink)

I'll put the kettle on and make us a cup of Rosy Lee.

lees
plural form of lee
lees
{n} dregs, sediment, a snare, loss, falsehood
Ann Lee
born Feb. 29, 1736, Manchester, Eng. died Sept. 8, 1784, Watervliet, N.Y., U.S. British-American religious leader. A factory worker in her youth in Manchester, she joined the Shakers in 1758 and was acknowledged as their leader in 1770. Persecuted by the English authorities and compelled by what she believed was a vision, she immigrated to America in 1774. With a band of followers, she founded a settlement at Niskeyuna (present-day Watervliet), N.Y., in 1776, and thereafter her movement spread rapidly. Mother Ann, as she came to be known, was said to have performed miracles, including healing the sick by touch. She was imprisoned briefly for treason because of her pacifist doctrines and refusal to sign an oath of allegiance
Benjamin Lee Whorf
born April 24, 1897, Winthrop, Mass., U.S. died July 26, 1941, Wethersfield, Conn. U.S. linguist. He worked professionally as a fire-prevention authority. The concept he developed (under Edward Sapir's influence) of the equation of culture and language became known as the Whorf (or Sapir-Whorf) hypothesis. He maintained that a language's structure tends to condition the ways its speakers think for example, that the way a people views time and punctuality may be influenced by the types of verb tenses in its language. Whorf was also noted for his studies of Uto-Aztecan languages, especially Hopi, and Mayan hieroglyphic writing
Bruce Lee
a Chinese actor, born in the US, who was famous for his skill at kung fu (=an ancient Chinese style of fighting) , and who appeared in films such as Enter the Dragon (1973) (1941-73). orig. Lee Yuen Kam born Nov. 27, 1940, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died July 20, 1973, Hong Kong U.S. film actor. The son of a touring Chinese opera star, he spent his childhood in Hong Kong, where he acted in several movies. He returned to the U.S., and in 1966 he landed a role in the television series The Green Hornet. In the early 1970s he became a popular star of martial-arts action films, including Fist of Fury (1972) ) and Enter the Dragon (1973), which gained an international cult following. His career was cut short by his sudden death at 33 from a brain edema suffered after taking a pain killer. Nevertheless, his films remained popular and became widely imitated. His son Brandon Lee (1965-93) was emerging as an action-movie star when he died in a shooting accident on a movie set
Bruce Lee
{i} (1941-1973) U.S. actor born in San Francisco (California) and grew up in Hong Kong who was an expert in kung fu (considered to be the greatest martial arts movie actor of the 20th century; amongst his movies: "Way of the Dragon" and "Enter The Dragon")
Claire Lee Chennault
born Sept. 6, 1890, Commerce, Texas, U.S. died July 27, 1958, New Orleans, La. U.S. brigadier general. He served in the army air corps for 20 years before retiring in 1937 because of increasing deafness. He became an air adviser to Chiang Kai-shek, and he formed the group of U.S. volunteer aviators called the Flying Tigers to combat the Japanese. Recalled to active duty in World War II, he commanded U.S. Army Air Forces in China (1942-45). He and his Chinese wife, Anna, remained influential supporters of Chiang Kai-shek
Edgar Lee Masters
born Aug. 23, 1869, Garnett, Kan., U.S. died March 5, 1950, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. poet and novelist. He grew up on his grandfather's farm and became a lawyer in Chicago. He wrote undistinguished poetry and plays before publishing Spoon River Anthology (1915), his major work. Its 245 free-verse epitaphs in the form of monologues are spoken from the grave by the former inhabitants of a fictitious small town, who tell of their bitter, unfulfilled lives in its dreary confines
Edward Lee Thorndike
born Aug. 31, 1874, Williamsburg, Mass., U.S. died Aug. 9, 1949, Montrose, N.Y. U.S. psychologist. He trained under William James and James McKeen Cattell and later taught at Columbia University (1904-40). A pioneer in the fields of animal learning and educational psychology, he developed a form of behaviourism known as connectionism, which holds that learning takes place through associative bonds. He contributed significantly to the development of quantitative experimental methods and to more efficient and scientifically based methods of teaching. Among his writings are Introduction to the Theory of Mental and Social Measurements (1904), Principles of Teaching Based on Psychology (1906), Animal Intelligence (1911), and The Psychology of Wants, Interests, and Attitudes (1935)
Fort Lee
A borough of northeast New Jersey on the Hudson River opposite Manhattan. Settled around 1700, it was an early center of the motion-picture industry. Population: 31,997
General Robert E. Lee
a US soldier who was the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War. Many people consider him the best military leader in that war (1807-70)
Gypsy Rose Lee
orig. Rose Louise Hovick born Jan. 9, 1914, Seattle, Wash., U.S. died April 26, 1970, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. striptease artist. She appeared in a vaudeville act with her sister from 1919 and made her debut in a burlesque show in 1929. She became the headliner at Billy Minsky's Republic Theatre on Broadway (1931) and appeared in the Ziegfeld Follies (1936). She was noted for her grace, style, and sophisticated wit. After retiring from burlesque (1937), she appeared in nightclubs and on television. Her autobiography, Gypsy (1957), was the basis for a successful 1959 musical (film, 1962)
Harper Lee
{i} Nelle Harper Lee (born 1926), United State writer who is famous for her novel "To Kill a Mockingbird
Harper Lee
born April 28, 1926, Monroeville, Ala., U.S. U.S. novelist. The daughter of a lawyer, Lee attended the University of Alabama but left for New York City before obtaining a law degree. An editor helped her transform a series of short stories into the novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960). Lee's only novel, it was nationally acclaimed, winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1961, and was adapted into a memorable film in 1962. The novel's hero is the white lawyer Atticus Finch, whose just and compassionate acts include an unpopular defense of a black man falsely accused of raping a white girl. The book continued to resonate into the 21st century
Henry Lee
born Jan. 29, 1756, Prince William county, Va. died March 25, 1818, Cumberland Island, Ga., U.S. American army officer and politician. In the American Revolution he rose to cavalry commander (earning the nickname "Light-Horse Harry") and led victories at Paulus Hook, N.J., and in the South. As governor of Virginia (1791-94), he commanded the army that suppressed the Whiskey Rebellion (1794). In the U.S. House of Representatives (1799-1801), he wrote the resolution eulogizing George Washington as "first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen." After 1800 Lee failed in several land and financial speculations and was twice imprisoned for debt. He was the father of Robert E. Lee
Ivy Ledbetter Lee
born July 16, 1877, Cedartown, Ga., U.S. died Nov. 9, 1934, New York, N.Y. U.S. public relations pioneer. He worked as a newspaper reporter before becoming press representative for a group of coal miners in 1906 and for the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. in 1912. His success in improving their public images brought him many powerful clients, including the Rockefeller interests. His greatest innovation was his frankness with the press, which he took care to notify of newsworthy developments at the companies he represented
Jamie Lee Curtis
(born 1958) American film actress who starred in "A Fish Called Wanda
Jerry Lee Lewis
born Sept. 29, 1935, Ferriday, La., U.S. U.S. rock-and-roll musician. He began playing piano in his childhood, influenced by blues and gospel musicians. He attended Bible school in Texas but was expelled. Returning to Louisiana, he played in several bands, perfecting his signature "pumping" piano technique (the left hand maintaining a driving boogie pattern while the right played flashy ornamentation). His first hits came in 1957 with "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" and "Great Balls of Fire." In 1958 it was discovered that he had married a 13-year-old relative, and his record sales dropped. Though he had a few more hits, he concentrated on his famously energetic and uninhibited live performances. His career continued to be plagued by controversy
Jerry Lee Rice
born Oct. 13, 1962, Starkville, Miss., U.S. U.S. football player. He won All-America honours at Mississippi Valley State University. As a wide receiver for the San Francisco 49ers (1985-2000), he was part of three Super Bowl championship teams (1988, 1989, and 1994). Standing 6 ft 2 in. (1.9 m), Rice was larger than the typical NFL wideout, and he used his size and strength to overmatch defenders; he was also an exceptional runner. He is the all-time NFL leader in touchdowns (203), receptions (1,456), receiving yards (21,597), and combined yardage (22,248)
Johnny Lee Bench
born December 7, 1947, Oklahoma City, Okla., U.S. U.S. baseball player. Bench joined the Cincinnati Reds in 1967. During his 17 seasons catching for them (1967-83), he helped lead the team (with Pete Rose and Joe Morgan) to four National League pennants (1970, 1972, 1975, 1976) and two World Series victories (1975, 1976). Batting right-handed, he led the National League in runs batted in three times (1970, 1972, 1974) and twice in home runs (1970, 1972). He is regarded as one of the greatest defensive catchers ever to play the game
Kenneth Lee Pike
born June 9, 1912, Woodstock, Conn., U.S. died Dec. 31, 2000, Dallas, Tex. U.S. linguist and anthropologist. Pike was associated throughout his career with the Summer Institute of Linguistics (now SIL International), an organization dedicated to linguistic study of little-known, unwritten languages, as an ancillary to Bible translation. He originated the linguistic theory known as tagmemics. The tagmeme, a unit comprising a function (e.g., a subject) and a class of items fulfilling that function (e.g., nouns), is identified by semantic as well as syntactic function
Laurie Lee
a British writer and poet, who wrote Cider with Rosie, which describes English country life when he was a child (1914-97)
Marvin Lee Minsky
born Aug. 9, 1927, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. computer scientist. He received a Ph.D. from Princeton University and joined the faculty at MIT, where he remained for his entire career. His research contributed to advances in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, neural networks (he built the first neural-network simulator in 1951), and the theory of Turing machines. A pioneer in robotics, he built some of the first mechanical hands with tactile sensors, visual scanners, and accompanying software and computer interfaces. He influenced many robotic projects outside MIT and worked to build into machines the human capacity for commonsense reasoning. In his The Society of Mind (1987), 270 interconnected one-page ideas reflect the structure of his theory. He received the Turing Award in 1969
Nelle Harper Lee
{i} Harper Lee (born 1926), United State writer who is famous for her novel "To Kill a Mockingbird
Peggy Lee
orig. Norma Deloris Egstrom born May 26, 1920, Jamestown, N.D., U.S. died Jan. 21, 2002, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. popular singer. She endured a difficult childhood after her mother's early death. Singing with a group in Chicago, she was engaged by Benny Goodman as his principal singer in 1941. She began singing on her own in 1943 and also began collaborating on songs, often with her husband, Dave Barbour, including "Fever," "Mañana," and several songs for Walt Disney's Lady and the Tramp (1955). With her smooth, lightly husky voice, usually backed by jazz-influenced arrangements, she produced other hits such as "Lover" and "Is That All There Is?
Richard Henry Lee
born Jan. 20, 1732, Stratford, Va. died June 19, 1794, Chantilly, Va., U.S. U.S. statesman. As a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses (1758-75), he opposed the Stamp Act and the Townshend Acts. He helped initiate the Committees of Correspondence and was active in the First and Second Continental Congress. On June 7, 1776, he introduced a resolution calling for independence from Britain. Its adoption led to the Declaration of Independence, which he signed, as he did the Articles of Confederation. He again served in Congress from 1784 to 1787, acting as its president in 1784. He opposed ratification of the Constitution of the United States because it lacked a bill of rights. He later served in the first U.S. Senate (1789-92)
Robert E Lee
born Jan. 19, 1807, Stratford, Westmoreland county, Va., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1870, Lexington, Va. U.S. and Confederate military leader. He was the son of Henry Lee. After graduating from West Point, he served in the engineering corps and in the Mexican War under Winfield Scott. He transferred to the cavalry in 1855 and commanded frontier forces in Texas (1856-57). In 1859 he led U.S. troops against the slave insurrection attempted by John Brown at Harpers Ferry. In 1861 he was offered command of a new army being formed to force the seceded Southern states back into the Union. Though opposed to secession, he refused. After his home state of Virginia seceded, he became commander of Virginia's forces in the American Civil War and adviser to Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy. Taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia (1862) after Joseph Johnston was wounded, Lee repulsed the Union forces in the Seven Days' Battles. He won victories at Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. His attempts to draw Union forces out of Virginia by invading the North resulted in failures at Antietam and Gettysburg. In 1864-65 he conducted defensive campaigns against Union forces under Ulysses S. Grant that caused heavy Union casualties. Lee ended his retreat behind fortifications built at Petersburg and Richmond (see Petersburg Campaign). By April 1865 dwindling forces and supplies forced Lee, now general of all Confederate armies, to surrender at Appomattox Court House. After several months of recuperation, he accepted the post of president of Washington College (later Washington and Lee University), where he served until his death
Robert E Lee
(1807-1870) general of the Confederate armies during the Civil War
Robert Edward Lee
born Jan. 19, 1807, Stratford, Westmoreland county, Va., U.S. died Oct. 12, 1870, Lexington, Va. U.S. and Confederate military leader. He was the son of Henry Lee. After graduating from West Point, he served in the engineering corps and in the Mexican War under Winfield Scott. He transferred to the cavalry in 1855 and commanded frontier forces in Texas (1856-57). In 1859 he led U.S. troops against the slave insurrection attempted by John Brown at Harpers Ferry. In 1861 he was offered command of a new army being formed to force the seceded Southern states back into the Union. Though opposed to secession, he refused. After his home state of Virginia seceded, he became commander of Virginia's forces in the American Civil War and adviser to Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy. Taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia (1862) after Joseph Johnston was wounded, Lee repulsed the Union forces in the Seven Days' Battles. He won victories at Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. His attempts to draw Union forces out of Virginia by invading the North resulted in failures at Antietam and Gettysburg. In 1864-65 he conducted defensive campaigns against Union forces under Ulysses S. Grant that caused heavy Union casualties. Lee ended his retreat behind fortifications built at Petersburg and Richmond (see Petersburg Campaign). By April 1865 dwindling forces and supplies forced Lee, now general of all Confederate armies, to surrender at Appomattox Court House. After several months of recuperation, he accepted the post of president of Washington College (later Washington and Lee University), where he served until his death
Robert Lee Frost
born March 26, 1874, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Jan. 29, 1963, Boston, Mass. U.S. poet. Frost's family moved to New England early in his life. After stints at Dartmouth College and Harvard University and a difficult period as a teacher and farmer, he moved to England and published his first collections, A Boy's Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914). At the outbreak of war he returned to New England. He closely observed rural life and in his poetry endowed it with universal, even metaphysical, meaning, using colloquial language, familiar rhythms, and common symbols to express both its pastoral ideals and its dark complexities. His collections include New Hampshire (1923, Pulitzer Prize), Collected Poems (1930, Pulitzer Prize), A Further Range (1936, Pulitzer Prize), and A Witness Tree (1942, Pulitzer Prize). He was unique among American poets of the 20th century in simultaneously achieving wide popularity and deep critical admiration. Many of his poems, including "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," "Birches," "The Death of the Hired Man," "Dust of Snow," "Fire and Ice," and "Home Burial," are widely anthologized
Sara Lee
American corporation headquartered in Illinois, worldwide manufacturer and distributor of retail products (including foods, apparel, household supplies, and health care products)
Sheldon Lee Glashow
{i} (born 1932) United States physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1979 together with Steven Weinberg and Abdus Salam
Sheldon Lee Glashow
born Dec. 5, 1932, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. theoretical physicist. He joined the faculty at Harvard University in 1967. With Steven Weinberg (b. 1933) and Abdus Salam (1926-1996), he received a 1979 Nobel Prize for formulation of the electroweak theory, unifying electromagnetism and the weak force. In extending the early, limited theory of Weinberg and Salam to include more classes of elementary particles, he had to invent an important new property (charm) for quarks
Shelton Jackson Lee
true name of Spike Lee (born 1957, African-American film director)
Spike Lee
African-American film director
Spike Lee
a black US film director who makes films about the lives of black people in the US, including She's Gotta Have It (1986), Do The Right Thing (1989), and Malcolm X (1992) (1957- ). orig. Shelton Jackson Lee born March 20, 1957, Atlanta, Ga., U.S. U.S. film director. He grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y., and earned a master's degree in film at New York University. The comedy She's Gotta Have It (1986) brought him attention, but it was Do the Right Thing (1989), a portrait of racial tensions in Brooklyn, that brought him widespread acclaim. Many of his films focused on aspects of African American life, including School Daze (1988), Jungle Fever (1991), Crooklyn (1994), and He Got Game (1998). The epic Malcolm X (1992) and the documentary Four Little Girls (1997) showed Lee's versatility as a director
Tim Berners-Lee
born June 8, 1955, London, Eng. British physicist. The son of computer scientists, he graduated from Oxford University and in 1980 accepted a fellowship at CERN in Geneva. In 1989 he suggested a global hypertext project. He and his CERN colleagues created a communications protocol called HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) that standardized communication between computer servers and clients. Their text-based Web browser was released to the public in 1991, marking the beginnings of the World Wide Web and general public use of the Internet. He declined all opportunities to profit from his immensely valuable innovation. In 1994 he joined MIT's Laboratory for Computer Science as director of the World Wide Web Consortium
Tommy Lee Jones
(born 1946) American film actor, winner of the 1993 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role in "The Fugitive
Washington and Lee University
Private university in Lexington, Virginia, U.S. Founded as an academy in 1749, it is one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in the U.S. It is named for George Washington, who presented the academy with a gift of $50,000 in 1796, and Robert E. Lee, who served as its president from 1865 to 1870. It became coeducational in 1984. It has an undergraduate college, a law school, and a school of commerce, economics, and politics. Among its offerings are programs in engineering, environmental studies, and journalism
William Lee
born 1550?, Calverton, Nottinghamshire, Eng. died 1610?, Paris, France British inventor of the first knitting machine. Lee's model (1589) was the only one employed for centuries, and its principle of operation remains in use. Elizabeth I twice denied him a patent because of her concern for the kingdom's hand knitters. With support from Henry IV of France, Lee later manufactured hosiery in Rouen
lees
the sediment from fermentation of an alcoholic beverage
lees
Deposit which forms in the vats after fermentation or storage of the wine, forced from impurities, yeast, tartar and residual matter from the crop
lees
{i} dregs, sediment or particles which settle at the bottom of fermented wine or other liquor
lees
There are lees to every wine The best things have some defect A French (Atasözü) “Doubt is the lees of thought ” Boker: Doubt, etc , i 11 Settling on the lees Making the best of a bad job; settling down on what is left, after having squandered the main part of one's fortune
lees
(wine term): sediment remaining in a barrel or tank during and after fermentation Often used as in sur lie (French for "on its lees") aging, which indicates a wine is aged "on its lees" This means that the wines are kept in contact with the dead yeast cells and are not racked or otherwise filtered This is done mainly for whites to enrich them It is a normal part of fermenting red wine
lees
Sediment occurring during winemaking or bottle aging
lees
the sediment deposited by wine during maturation
lees
See 2d Lee
lees
Refers to residual yeast and other particles that precipitate, or are carried by the action of "fining", to the bottom of the fermentation vessel US winemakers use the term "mud" Imparts distinctive flavours to the wine depending on type Derived from French term "lies" as in "sur lies"
lees
Sediment remaining in a barrel during and after fermentation
lees
(Singular, though the word doesn't look like it ought to be); the sediment which settles to the bottom of the wine in a tank during processing If primarily yeast, as from a fermentation, it is called "yeast lees;" if sediment from fining, it is called "fining lees "
lees
Lees are the solid element which precipitates at the end of the fermentation; cells of dead yeast, pulp of berries and, in red wines, pips and grape-skin
lees
Sediment settling during fermentation, especially in wine; dregs
lees
dregs or sediments that settles at the bottom of a container
lees
plural of lee
lees
Term describing the sediment that settles on the bottom of a wine bottle or tank
lees
crust that forms in the bottom of the vat during the fermentation Also the tannin crust in the bottom of ageing bottles
lees
The sediment deposited by young wines in barrel or vat, consisting mainly of inactive yeasts and small particles of solid matter from the grape
lees
Lees are the grape skins and other grape solids that remain after crushing See sur lie
lees
During and after fermentation there are particles left over from the grapes and fermentation These yeast cells, grape skin, seed, leaf, and twig particles are called sediment and often there is a lot of it This coarse, rough sediment is at times separated from the wine through racking When the wine is left on the lees in an attempt to garner more flavor, this is called sur lie aging
lees
A leash
lees
The deposit of yeast and solids formed during fermentation
lees
Dregs
lees
Sediment remaining in a barrel or tank during and after fermentation Often used as in sur lie aging, which indicates a wine is aged on its lees See also: sur lie
lees
Solid residue (mostly dead yeast cells and grape pulp, pips and skins) that remains in the cask after the wine has been drawn off Many white wines and some reds are kept on their lees for a period of time to protect them from oxidation, enrich their textures and add complexity Wines protected by lees contact can often be made with less sulfur addition, but careful technique is essential to ensure that off aromas don't develop
lees
Grape solids and dead yeast which remains in a barrel or tank during and after fermentation
lees
the sediment that settles at the bottom of a liquid, esp a fermented liquid such as wine; dregs
lees
The sediment that settles during fermentation of beverages, consisting of dead yeast and precipitated parts of the fruit
lees
Sediment remaining in a barrel or tank during and after fermentation Often used as in sur lie aging, which indicates a wine is aged "on its lees " See also sur lie
robert e lee's birthday
celebrated in southern United States
lee

    Турецкое произношение

    li

    Произношение

    /ˈlē/ /ˈliː/

    Этимология

    [ 'lE ] (noun.) before 12th century. Middle English, from Old English hlēo(w) (“shelter, protection”), from Proto-Germanic *xliwan (compare German Lee (“shelter”), lau (“lukewarm”), Swedish lä, Danish læ, Dutch lij), from Proto-Indo-European *k̑lei- (compare Welsh clyd (“warm, cozy”), Latin calēre (“to warm up”), Lithuanian šiltas (“warm, pleasant”), Sanskrit शरद् (śarad, “autumn”)).

    Слово дня

    nuptial
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