hurricane

listen to the pronunciation of hurricane
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
kasırga

Amerikan haber Irene Kasırgası'nın Avrupa kadar büyük olduğunu bildiriyor, bu biraz abartıdır. - The American news is reporting that Hurricane Irene is as big as Europe, which is a bit of an exaggeration.

Kasırga mağdurları hükümetten mali yardım aldı. - Victims of the hurricane received financial aid from the government.

hurricane deck yolcu gemilerinin en üst güvertesi
hurricane signal şiddetli ve tehlikeli bir kasırganın geleceğini işaret eden bayrak
{i} fırtına

Bir fırtına rüzgarın hızı saatte yüz on dokuz kilometreye ulaşırsa kasırga olur. - A storm turns into a hurricane when the wind speed reaches a hundred nineteen kilometers an hour.

Kasırgalar şiddetli fırtınalardır. - Hurricanes are violent storms.

gemici feneri
hurricane lamp rüzgar feneri
urağan
(Çevre) tropik siklon
(Meteoroloji) hortum
hurricane deck
üst güverte
hurricane lamp
rüzgâr feneri
hurricane lamp
gemici feneri
hurricane roof
kasırga çatısı
hurricane Irene
İrene Kasırgası
hurricane katrina
Katrina Kasırgası
hurricane season
kasırga sezonu
hurricane, typhoon
kasırga, tayfun
hurricane lamp
(Askeri) fırtına feneri
hurricane lantern
(Askeri) gemici feneri
hurricane lantern
(Askeri) fırtına feneri
hurricane stage hydrograph
(Askeri) kasırga seviye hidrografı
hurricane surge hydrograph
(Askeri) kasırga kabarma hidrografı
hurricane warning
(Meteoroloji) kasırga ihbarı
hurricane watch
(Meteoroloji) kasırga gözlemi
hurricane wave
(Meteoroloji) kasırga dalgası
cyclone, hurricane
siklon, kasırga
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
A British fighter aircraft used during World War II, especially during the Battle of Britain
A town in West Virginia, United States, population 5,968 (2005 census estimate)
A town in Utah, United States, population 9,748 (2004 Census estimate)
A severe tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or in the eastern North Pacific off the west coast of Mexico, with winds of 75 miles per hour (120.7 kph) or greater accompanied by rain, lightning, and thunder that sometimes moves into temperate latitudes
a wind scale for quite strong wind, stronger than a storm
"full—triple-full—full" – an acrobatic maneuver consisting of three flips and five twists, with one twist on the first flip, three twists on the second flip, one twist on the third flip
A severe tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or in the eastern North Pacific off the west coast of Mexico with winds of 75 miles per hour or greater accompanied by rain, lightning, and thunder that sometimes moves into temperate latitudes Variant names given to the same type of storm in other areas of the world include typhoon (eastern Asia), cyclone (India), willy willy (Australia), and baguio (China Sea)
is a severe tropical storm whose winds exceed 74 miles per hour Hurricanes originate over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans,because high sea surface temperatures are essential to their formation
A storm originating in the tropics that has sustained winds of at least 74 miles per hour (64 knots)
A warm-core tropical cyclone with one-minute sustained winds of 74 mph or more The term hurricane is used for Northern Hemisphere cyclones east of the International Dateline to the Greenwich Meridian The term typhoon is used for Pacific cyclones north of the Equator west of the International Dateline
The name for a tropical cyclone with sustained winds of 74 miles per hour (65 knots) or greater in the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern North Pacific Ocean This same tropical cyclone is known as a typhoon in the western Pacific and a cyclone in the Indian Ocean
A severe tropical cyclone with wind speeds in excess of 74 mph (64 knots)
{i} strong tropical storm
Pronounced circulation Maximum sustained winds exceed 64 knots (74mph)
A warm-core tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind (using the U S 1-minute average) is 64 kt (74 mph or 119 kph) or more The term hurricane is used for Northern Hemisphere cyclones east of the International Dateline to the Greenwich Meridian It has a diameter of 250 to 500 miles and a cyclonic circulation typically extending to near 50,000 feet It is called a Typhoon in the western Pacific north of the Equator and west of the International Dateline, a Cyclone in the Indian Ocean, and Baguio in the Philippines area
a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)
A tropical cyclone with winds of 74 mph or more
A severe tropical cyclone with sustained winds over 74 mph (64 knots) Normally applied to such storms in the Atlantic Basin and the Pacific Ocean east of the International Date Line
a tropical storm marked by extremely low barometric pressure and circular winds with a velocity of 120 km/h or more
a tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of at least 74 miles per hour (classes of hurricanes) Also referred to as Typhoons and Cyclones
A tropical cyclone with winds of 74 mph or more Normally applied to such storms in the Atlantic Basin and the Pacific Ocean east of the International Date Line
A violent storm, characterized by extreme fury and sudden changes of the wind, and generally accompanied by rain, thunder, and lightning; especially prevalent in the East and West Indies
A tropical storm (qv) with winds in excess of 75 mph
intense, low pressure weather system with sustained surface wind speeds that exceed 118 km/hr (74 mph)
A hurricane is an extremely violent wind or storm. a type of British fighter aircraft which became famous in World War II for its success against enemy bombers and fighters. a storm that has very strong fast winds and that moves over water cyclone, typhoon typhoon, tornado tornado (huracán, from hurakán)
A tropical cyclone with winds in excess of 64 knots (74 mph)
A severe tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds over 74mph at the surface They are called hurricanes in the Atlantic& Eastern Pacific Oceans In an average hurricane just one percent of the energy released could meet the energy needs of the United States for a full year The force of the winds near the eye is equivalent to an atomic bomb exploding every ten seconds
A cyclonic storm, usually of tropic origin, covering an extensive area, and containing winds in excess of 75 miles per hour
A tropical cyclone, formed in the atmosphere over warm ocean areas, in which wind speeds reach 74 miles per hour or more and blow in a large spiral around a relatively calm center or "eye" Circulation is counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere (FEMA definition)
– This signature cocktail of New Orleans is a potent sweet fruit punch and rum drink that is served in a special hurricane lamp glass that has become one of the most sought-after souvenirs in New Orleans During celebrations (celebrations seem to be nightly in the New Orleans French Quarter) tourists carry their “to go” Hurricane drink down the streets Hurricanes are also the cocktail of choice during Mardi Gras, where thousands come to parade and party The Hurricane was made famous by Pat O’Brien’s French Quarter bar Other restaurants and bars serve this drink but it has become synonymous with Pat O’Brien’s, where people line up to get their Hurricane drink
An intense cyclonic storm consisting of an organized mass of thunderstorms that develops over the warm oceans of the tropics To be classified as a hurricane, winds speeds in the storm must be greater than 118 kilometers per hour
Also used figuratively
A tropical cyclonic storm having minimum winds of 74 miles per hour; also known as typhoon (western Pacific) and cyclone (Indian Ocean)
a tropical cyclone that occurs in the northern hemisphere with sustained winds of at least 74 mph (64 kt) or greater
a violent, spiraling tropical storm with fierce rotating winds and a calm central eye; usually develops over warm tropical seas; these storms are known as hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, or west of the international dateline in the Pacific Ocean
A massive low pressure system of tropical origin with rotary winds that exceed 119 kilometers per hour (74 miles per hour) blowing counterclockwise around a relatively calm central area called the eye
{n} a violent storm, a great tempest
hurricane bow
A completely enclosed hangar deck found on many aircraft carriers
hurricane bows
plural form of hurricane bow
hurricane punch
(Edebiyat) Hurricane Punch is a novel by Tim Dorsey published in 2007. It follows overly zelous serial killer Serge A. Storms, who is tracking hurricanes all over Florida
Hurricane Katrina
{i} devastating and most destructive hurricane ever in the United States that hit the Mississippi and Louisiana states (and other southern states) in August 2005 causing unprecedented death and destruction mostly in New Orleans
hurricane deck
a deck at the top of a passenger ship
hurricane deck
The upper deck on a passenger steamship
hurricane lamp
n. A lamp with a candle, oiled wick, or electric bulb protected by a glass chimney. a lamp that has a glass cover to protect the flame inside from the wind
hurricane lamp
an oil lamp with a glass chimney and perforated metal lid to protect the flame from high winds; candlestick with a glass chimney
hurricanes
tropical storms with winds exceeding 74 mph originating over the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans near high humidity and light winds One well known characteristic of a hurricane is it's eye, which is generally about 5 to 25 miles in diameter and in which are present calm conditions, with clear skies and light winds Hurricanes can move rather quickly losing intensity as soon as land is encountered, but not without having created very high tides and possibly massive destruction
hurricanes
Large cyclonic oceanic storms with heavy rain and winds exceeding 119 km/hr (74 mph)
hurricanes
Severe tropical storms whose winds exceed 74 mph Hurricanes originate over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, where there is high humidity and light wind These conditions prevail mostly in the summer and early fall Since hurricanes can take days or even weeks to form, time is usually available for preventive or protective measures
hurricanes
A wind with a speed greater than 74 miles (119 kilometers) per hour, according to the Beaufort scale
hurricanes
plural of hurricane
media hurricane
major coverage by the mass media, large number of media reporters covering an event
hurricane
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