heave

listen to the pronunciation of heave
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
{f} kaldırmak
inip
{i} çaba
{f} kabarmak
yukarı çekmek
{f} kaldırmaya uğraş
kabarmak göğüs şişirmek
{f} çekmek
{f} şişirmek
{f} öğürmek
{f} atmak
{f} inip kalkmak
{i} fırlatma
{i} nefesi kesilme (at)
{f} büyük bir güçle atmak/fırlatmak
belli bir rotada gitmek
{i} kaldırma
şişip inmek
{i} kabarma
fırlatmak
güçlükle çıkarmak kusmak
kabartmak
(gemi) seyretmek
kaldırıp atmak
yatay atım
{f} yukarı kaldırmak
büyük bir güçle atmak veya fırlatmak
yukarıya hareket
yatay bir şekil
{f} (deniz) kabarmak. 6
kaldırmaya uğraş(mak)
ırgatı çevirmek
{f} kusmak
{i} fay hareketi
{f} yükseltmek, kabartmak
{i} atma
iç geçirmek
heave to
rüzgârı başa alıp gemiyi durdurmak
heave to
faça edip durmak
heave a sigh
of çekmek
heave in sight
görüş mesafesine girmek
heave no stone unturned
çalmadık kapı bırakmamak
heave up
kusup çıkarmak
heave up
vira etmek
heave anchor
çapa çekmek
heave at
vira at
heave at rope
ip at çekmek
heave forth
ileri çekmek
heave to
için çekmek
Heave ho
den. Yisa!/Vira salpa!
heave a sigh
içini çekmek, ah çekmek
heave a sigh
iç çekmek
heave a sigh
iç geçirmek
heave a sigh
içini çekmek
heave of the sea
deniz kabarması
heave of the sea
denizin yükselmesi
bottom heave
(Jeoloji,Teknik) taban kabarması
floor heave
(Jeoloji,Madencilik) taban kabarması
heaves
atlarda soluğan hastalığ
heaving
{f} kaldırmaya uğraş: prep.kaldı
heaving
{i} kaldırılma
heaving
kaldirmaya uğraş
heaving
{i} kaldırmaya uğraşma
hove
kaldırılmış
hove
heave ilerle
pile heave
zemin kabarması
pile heave
kazık yükselmesi
frost heave
donma şişmesi
frost heave
donma kabarması
heaved
{f} kaldırmaya uğraş
heaver
kaldırıcı
heaver
manivela
hove
{f} kaldırmaya uğraş
frost heave
donma şişmesi, kabarması
get the heave ho
olsun çekmek ho
heaved
kaldırılmış
heaving
kaldırmaya uğraş(mak)
frost heave
(Jeoloji,Meteoroloji) don kabarması
frost heave
(Meteoroloji) don şişmesi
heaver
{i} kaldıraç
heaver
{i} kaldıran kimse
heaver
(Askeri) halat örmeye özgü demir
heaving
{i} atma
heaving
{i} kabarma
heaving
{i} kaldırma
hove
f., bak. heave
yo heave ho
heyamola
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
To make an effort to vomit; to retch

The smell of the old cheese was enough to make you heave.

The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel goes up and down in a short period of time. Compare with pitch
A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode
To move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation

The ship hove in sight.

To pull up with a rope or cable

Heave up the anchor there, boys!.

To lift with difficulty; to raise with some effort; to lift (a heavy thing)

We heaved the chest-of-doors on to the second-floor landing.

To cause to swell or rise, especially in repeated exertions

The wind heaved the waves.

An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy
To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards
An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like
To displace (a vein, stratum)
To throw, cast

The cap'n hove the body overboard.

To utter with effort

She heaved a sigh and stared out of the window.

To rise and fall

Her chest heaved with emotion.

{n} a lift, swell, struggle, effort, endeavor
{v} to lift, swell, pant, beat, vomit, cast
To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land
If you heave, or if your stomach heaves, you vomit or feel sick. My stomach heaved and I felt sick
an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea"
throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes" an involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting; "a bad case of the heaves" the act of lifting something with great effort (geology) a horizontal dislocation an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea" bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat; "The highway buckled during the heatwave" utter a sound, as with obvious effort; "She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do" lift or elevate throw with great effort nautical: to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position; "The vessel hove into sight
lift or elevate
{f} lift, raise; toss, throw; rhythmically rise and fall; vomit; sigh heavily
throw with great effort
throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes"
To throw; to cast; obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log
to swell; to dilate; to expand; to distend; hence, to labor; to struggle
(1) The vertical rise or fall of the WAVES or the SEA (2) The translational movement of a craft parallel to its vertical axis (3) The net transport of a floating body resulting from WAVE action
To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead
Ship motion in the vertical direction
To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound
If you heave something heavy or difficult to move somewhere, you push, pull, or lift it using a lot of effort. It took five strong men to heave the statue up a ramp and lower it into place Heave is also a noun. It took only one heave to hurl him into the river
utter a sound, as with obvious effort; "She heaved a deep sigh when she saw the list of things to do"
rise and move, as in waves or billows; "The army surged forward"
An effort to raise something, as a weight, or ones self, or to move something heavy
If you heave a sigh, you give a big sigh. Mr Collier heaved a sigh and got to his feet
breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted; "The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily"
To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult
(geology) a horizontal dislocation
make an unsuccessful effort to vomit; strain to vomit
To rise and fall with alternate motions, as the lungs in heavy breathing, as waves in a heavy sea, as ships on the billows, as the earth when broken up by frost, etc
To pull on a line Also to throw a line
the act of raising something; "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"; "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up"
To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards or forwards
lift or elevate throw with great effort nautical: to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position; "The vessel hove into sight
bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat; "The highway buckled during the heatwave"
an involuntary spasm of ineffectual vomiting; "a bad case of the heaves"
the act of lifting something with great effort
If something heaves, it moves up and down with large regular movements. His chest heaved, and he took a deep breath
to heave a sigh of relief: see sigh
To throw (an object or line)
To make an effort to vomit; to retch; to vomit
To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh
To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom
{i} act of lifting or raising; rhythmic rising and falling; toss, throw; attempt to vomit
the act of lifting something with great effort (geology) a horizontal dislocation an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea"
nautical: to move or cause to move in a specified way, direction, or position; "The vessel hove into sight"
heave-ho
a rejection, a forced removal (often in the phrase give/get the (old) heave-ho)

Why would you think I'm still seeing Colin Murphy? I gave him the heave-ho, remember?.

heave-ho
exclamation used when pulling, especially by sailors while pulling on a rope

Heave ho! up they hoisted their prize, dripping with moisture, and festooned with verdant water-moss.

heave-ho
A cry of heave-ho
heave-ho
to pull forcefully

They were heave-ho-ing, stopping and unstopping, pawling, catting, and fishing, for three hours;.

heave-to
To stop (a seagoing vessel)
heave-to
To back-wind the jib and luff the main to hold a position especially in heavy seas
heave ho
Used as a command to sailors to pull hard on a rope or cable
heave offering
An offering or oblation heaved up or elevated before the altar, as the shoulder of the peace offering
heave offering
See Wave offering
heave to
To bring a vessel to a position where she will maintain little or no headway, usually with the bow into the wind or nearly so
heave to
To set the sails of a vessel so that their driving force is in opposition This allows a vessel to stop or slow while her sails are still set
heave to
A sailing vessel is hove to when a headsail is backed, thus reducing the way through the water
heave to
To bring a vessel up in a position where it will maintain little or no headway, usually with the bow into the wind or nearly so
heave to
– To stop the forward movement of a ship by bringing the vessel’s bow into the wind and keeping it there
heave to
Steering into the wind and sea making minimum headway
heave to
To position a vessel's bow into the wind and hold it there until she stops, at which time she is considered "hove to"
heave-ho
pull! (interjection made when pulling on a rope)
heave-ho
(Slang) dismissal from a job
dry-heave
an attempt to vomit that ejects only gas
dry-heave
To attempt to vomit with the ejection of only gas
give somebody the heave-ho
to fire, expel or break up with someone

I'm looking for work again because they gave me the heave-ho.

give somebody the old heave-ho
Alternative form of give somebody the heave-ho

Now I won't have to explain to her what sort of friend you really were and why I gave you the old heave-ho.

heaved
Simple past tense and past participle of heave
heaves
Third-person singular simple present indicative form of heave
heaves
plural form of heave
heaves
A disease of horses characterized by coughing and difficult breathing
heaving
crowded with people

At this time it was pissing down and by the time Joe Satriani cam on the tent was heaving with people just coming in to keep dry.

heaving
An occasion on which something heaves or is heaved
heaving
Present participle of heave
hove
To float
hove
To move, move out of the way, stand aside
hove
To rise

Astond he stood, and vp his haire did houe, / And with that suddein horror could no member moue.

hove
Simple past tense and past participle of heave
hove
To wait, linger; to loiter, hover about
hove
To raise, lift
hove
To hover in the air
heaving
{n} a lifting, swelling, effort to vomit
hove
{a} of to heave
Hove
haf
frost heave
upthrust of ground or pavement caused by the freezing of moist soil
frost heave
A section of ruptured pavement caused by the expansion of freezing water immediately under the road. Also called frost boil
heaved
past of heave
heaver
One who, or that which, heaves or lifts; a laborer employed on docks in handling freight; as, a coal heaver
heaver
{i} one who heaves; lifter; caster
heaver
a bar used as a lever (as in twisting rope) a workman who heaves freight or bulk goods (especially at a dockyard)
heaver
a bar used as a lever (as in twisting rope)
heaver
A bar used as a lever
heaver
a workman who heaves freight or bulk goods (especially at a dockyard)
heaves
plural of heave
heaves
a chronic emphysema of the horse that causes difficult expiration and heaving of the flanks
heaves
A disease of horses, characterized by difficult breathing, with heaving of the flank, wheezing, flatulency, and a peculiar cough; broken wind
heaves
A period of retching
heaves
{i} lung disease in horses characterized by breathing difficulties (the heaves resemble asthma in humans)
heaves
third-person singular of heave
heaving
A lifting or rising; a swell; a panting or deep sighing
heaving
an upward movement (especially a rhythmical rising and falling); "the heaving of waves on a rough sea"
heaving
the act of lifting something with great effort
heaving
{i} rising and falling interchangeably (as in waves); tossing a heavy item with much effort; panting; freezing and defrosting of the ground that causes a plant to be pushed upward and exposing its roots to damage (Botany)
heaving
very busy or full of people heaving with
heaving
rising and falling alternately as in waves; "the heaving waves in the storm-tossed sea"; "the exhausted dog's heaving chest"
heaving
rising and falling alternately as in waves; "the heaving waves in the storm-tossed sea"; "the exhausted dog's heaving chest
heaving
throwing something heavy (with great effort); "he gave it a mighty heave"; "he was not good at heaving passes"
heaving
breathing heavily (as after exertion)
hove
To rise; to swell; to heave; to cause to swell
hove
Irregular past tense of to heave
hove
of Heave
hove
Hove is the past tense and past participle of heave in one of its meanings. A municipal borough of southeast England on the English Channel west of Brighton. It is a residential seaside resort. Population: 88,500. Past tense and past participle of heave. a past tense and past participle of heave
hove
To hover around; to loiter; to lurk
heave

    Турецкое произношение

    hiv

    Произношение

    /ˈhēv/ /ˈhiːv/

    Этимология

    [ hEv ] (verb.) before 12th century. Middle English heven, hebben, from Old English hebban, from Proto-Germanic *habjanan (“to take up, lift”) (compare West Frisian heffe, Dutch heffen, German heben, Danish hæve), from Proto-Indo-European *kap- (compare Old Irish cáin 'law, tribute', cacht 'prisoner', Latin capiō 'to take', Latvian kàmpt 'to seize', Albanian kap (“I grasp, seize”), Ancient Greek κάπτω (káptō, “to gulp down”), κώπη (kṓpē, “handle”)).

    Времена

    heaves, heaving, heaved, heaved

    Видео

    ... I'm a heave Google user. ...

    Слово дня

    arborescent
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