hearsay

listen to the pronunciation of hearsay
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
information that was heard by one person about another
evidence based on the reports of others rather than on personal knowledge; normally inadmissible because not made under oath
evidence: an out-of-court statement offered in court for the truth of the matter asserted; normally inadmissible because not subject to cross-examination, unless the hearsay statement falls under one of the many exceptions
{n} report, rumor, fame, common talk
Any evidence that is offered by a witness of which they do not have direct knowledge but, rather, their testimony is based on what others have said to them For example, if Bob heard from Susan about an accident that Susan witnessed but that Bob had not, and Bob attempted to repeat Susan's story in court, it could be objected to as "hearsay " The basic rule, when testifying in court, is that you can only provide information of which you have direct knowledge In other words, hearsay evidence is not allowed Hearsay evidence is also referred to as "second-hand evidence" or as "rumor " You are able to tell a court what you heard, to repeat the rumor, and testify that, in fact, the story you heard was told to you, but under the hearsay rule, your testimony would not be evidence of the actual facts of the story but only that you heard those words spoken
(RWT) Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court
What toddlers do when anyone mutters a dirty word
A statement, other than one made by the declarant while testifying at the trial or hearing offered in evidence to prove the truth of the matter asserted "Hearsay evidence" is evidence of a statement that was made other than by a witness while testifying at the hearing and that is offered to prove the truth of the matter stated
{i} rumor, gossip, unofficial information received by word of mouth
A term applied to that species of testimony given by a witness who relates, not what he knows personally, but what others have told him, or what he has heard said by others The very nature of the evidence shows its weakness, and, as such, hearsay evidence is generally indadmissable unless it falls within one of the many exceptions which provides for admissibility
Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else Hearsay may not be admissible
heard through another rather than directly; "hearsay information
Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court
In legal terms, hearsay is information given to a witness by another person, but which the witness did not see or otherwise experience first hand The witness does not have personal knowledge of the original event
What someone else has been heard to say as contrasted with direct hearing
Hearsay is information which you have been told but do not know to be true. Much of what was reported to them was hearsay. something that you have heard about from other people but do not know to be definitely true or correct
Information given to a witness by another person The witness did not see the information first hand The witness does not have personal knowledge of the original event Hearsay is not admissible in court
heard through another rather than directly; "hearsay information"
gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth
type of evidence in court where you describe what you were told by others
hearsay is the word used to describe the kind of evidence where one person is recounting to the court what they heard another person, who may not be present in the court, say or what they were told (but did not see themselves) that another person had done Usually, hearsay evidence is held either not to be admissible or that if admissible, less weight is attached to it than to other more direct evidence
A statement made outside of the hearing Most hearsay evidence is not allowed as evidence in court
That kind of evidence which is not entirely within the personal knowledge of the witness but is partly within the personal knowledge of another person
evidence based on what the witness has heard someone else say, rather than what he has personally experienced
- Evidence based on what the witness has heard someone else say rather than what the witness has personally experienced or observed
Testimony intended to be proof of the truth of a statement, arising not from personal knowledge or experience of the witness but from repetition of what the witness has heard others say; such testimony is generally not admitted into evidence
Report; rumor; fame; common talk; something heard from another
{s} of or pertaining to hearsay
Evidence based on what the witness has heard someone else say, rather than what the witness has personally experienced or observed
Evidence not proceeding from the personal knowledge of the witness
Second-hand evidence, generally consisting of a witness's testimony that he/she heard someone else say something
hearsay evidence
evidence based on what someone has told the witness and not of direct knowledge
hearsay evidence
evidence based on information that a witness heard from another rather than being based on his personal knowledge (usually inadmissible in a court of law since it is not direct evidence)
hearsay rule
a rule that declares not admissible as evidence any statement other than that by a witness
hearsay witness
witness who reports information that was he heard from another rather than being based on personal knowledge
from hearsay
from gossip, from rumors
hearsay
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