delaware

listen to the pronunciation of delaware
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
(Coğrafya) Delaware Eyaleti, ABD'deki 50 eyalet içerisinde büyüklük olarak 5.294 km² alanıyla 49. sırada bulunmaktadır. Eyalet, Atlas Okyanusu ve Chesapeake Körfezi arasındaki bölgede, Delmerva yarımadasında kurulmuştur. Delaware Eyaletinin büyük kısmı Atlantik Okyanusu kıyı şeridinde bulunmaktadır. Delaware Eyaleti bu kıyı şeridi boyunca 45 km² bir alana sahiptir. Eyaletin kuzeydeki sınırı Piedmont platosu olarak bilinen bölgenin eteklerine kurulmuştur. Delaware nehri ve Christine nehri eyaletin önemli nehirlerindendir. Delaware'in en büyük şehirleri Wilmington, Newark ve başkent olan Döver'dir
delaware bay
Delaware defne
Турецкий язык - Турецкий язык
ABD'deki nehirler
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
A river that arises in the Catskill mountains
The Algonquian languages of these people
An indigenous Native American people
A state of the United States of America. Capital: Dover
{n} a river, and a state upon its bank
{i} state in the United States; river in the eastern United States; variety of grape having a sweet red fruit; family name
DE a small state in the northeastern US. It was one of the original thirteen colonies established under British rule. State (pop., 2000: 783,600), middle Atlantic region, U.S. It lies on the Atlantic Ocean and is bordered by Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland. Covering 2,026 sq mi (5,247 sq km), its capital is Dover. Originally inhabited by Algonquian tribes, Delaware's first permanent white settlement was by Swedes at Fort Christina, now Wilmington, in 1638. In 1655 New Sweden was taken by the Dutch of New Amsterdam and in 1664 by the English. Delaware was thereafter a part of New York until 1682, when it was ceded to William Penn. It was governed by Pennsylvania until 1776, although it was granted its own assembly in 1704. The first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution in 1787, it is the nation's second smallest state but one of its most densely populated. Chemical manufacturing is the major industry, followed by food processing. Delaware's most important transportation artery is the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, deepened for ocean shipping, which shortens the water route between Philadelphia and Baltimore. or Lenape Confederation of North American Indians living mostly in Oklahoma, U.S. Thousands more live in Wisconsin and Kansas, U.S., and in Ontario, Can. They speak a language of the Algonquian family. They once occupied the Atlantic seaboard from southern Delaware to western Long Island, especially the Delaware River valley, for which the confederation was named. To other Algonquian divisions, the Lenape were the "grandfathers," believed to be the original tribe from which all others sprang, and they were highly respected. They depended primarily on agriculture but also hunted and fished. They were grouped in three clans based on maternal descent; these were in turn divided into lineages, whose members lived together in a longhouse. They were governed by a council of lineage sachems (chiefs), who directed the public affairs of the community; the eldest woman of the lineage appointed the sachem. The Delaware were the Indians most friendly to William Penn; they were rewarded by the infamous Walking Purchase, a treaty that deprived them of their own lands and forced them to settle on lands assigned to the Iroquois. After 1690 they drifted westward. They sided with the French in the French and Indian War (1754-63) and helped defeat the British general Edward Braddock. In 1867 most of the remaining Delaware were removed to Oklahoma. Some 8,300 people claimed sole Delaware descent in the 2000 U.S. census. Baron Delaware Delaware Bay Delaware River
A Capital: Dover
the Algonquian language spoken by the Delaware people a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies one of the British colonies that formed the United States a river that rises in the Catskills in southeastern New York and flows southward along the border of Pennsylvania with New York and New Jersey to northern Delaware where it empties into Delaware Bay a member of an Algonquian people formerly living in New Jersey and New York and parts of Delaware and Pennsylvania
one of the British colonies that formed the United States
An American grape, with compact bunches of small, amber-colored berries, sweet and of a good flavor
U S America, was granted by charter in 1701 to Lord De la Ware, who first explored the bay into which the river empties itself
A native American hybrid grape variety used to make dry, sweet and sparkling white wines of good quality and barely perceptible "foxy" character Commonly grown in the Eastern U S on deep, fertile, well-drained soils where it ripens in early to mid-October, it has considerable popularity when made into "ice-wine" Has some susceptibility to fruit and foliage fungus diseases and requires grafting to a phylloxera-resistant rootstock for best growth For Arkansas the main recommendation is to cold-press grapes that were grown on grafted rootstocks and finish as a 1 5 - 2 0% residual sugar, or as a true dessert, wine Also described as an excellent (seedbearing) Tablegrape A selected seedling of this variety named Jewel, with synonym names Burr 1 and Burr's Early was very popular in the first years of the 20th century, ripening a little earlier than its better known sibling
the Algonquian language spoken by the Delaware people
American Indians who once lived in the present day states of Delaware, Pennsylvania and Virginia They farmed for a living and lived in long houses with arched roofs The great numbers of Euro-Americans who settled in their homelands forced them westward At the time of Lewis and Clark, there were Delaware villages in Missouri
a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies
a river that rises in the Catskills in southeastern New York and flows southward along the border of Pennsylvania with New York and New Jersey to northern Delaware where it empties into Delaware Bay
a member of an Algonquian people formerly living in New Jersey and New York and parts of Delaware and Pennsylvania
Del
Delaware Bay
An estuary of the Delaware River emptying into the Atlantic Ocean between eastern Delaware and southern New Jersey. Inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. Forming part of the New Jersey-Delaware state border, it extends southeast for 52 mi (84 km) from the junction of the Delaware River with Alloway Creek to its entrance between Cape May and Cape Henlopen. Bordered by marshy lowlands, the bay is an important link in the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway
Delaware River
A river rising in the Catskill Mountains of southeast New York and flowing about 451 km (280 mi) generally southward along the New York-Pennsylvania border and the Pennsylvania-New Jersey border to northern Delaware, where it enters Delaware Bay. The Dutch explorers named it the South River to distinguish it from the North River, an estuary of the Hudson River. River in Pennsylvania and Delaware, U.S. Formed by the junction of its eastern and western branches in southern New York, it flows some 280 mi (451 km) to empty into the Atlantic Ocean at Delaware Bay. Navigable to Trenton, N.J., it is spanned by the Commodore John Barry Bridge (1,644 ft [500 m] long), completed in 1974
delaware bay
an inlet of the North Atlantic; fed by the Delaware River
delaware memorial bridge
a suspension bridge across the Delaware River
University of Delaware
large public university located in Newark (Delaware, USA)
delaware

    Расстановка переносов

    Del·a·ware

    Турецкое произношение

    delıwer

    Произношение

    /ˈdeləˌwer/ /ˈdɛləˌwɛr/

    Этимология

    [ 'de-l&-"war, -"wer, -w& ] (noun.) 1721. Derived from the name of Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr.

    Слово дня

    moratorium
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