cranny

listen to the pronunciation of cranny
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
gedik
yarık
çatlak
kuytu
crannied yarık
rahne
{i} sığınak
crannied
çatlaklı
every nook and cranny
köşe bucak
every nook and cranny
(deyim) every nook and cranny (search...) kose bucak (aramak)
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
A tool for forming the necks of bottles, etc
A small, narrow opening, fissure, crevice, or chink, as in a wall, or other substance
{n} a chink, cleft, crevice, little crack
To haunt, or enter by, crannies
Crannies are very narrow openings or spaces in something. They fled like lizards into crannies in the rocks. every nook and cranny: see nook = crevice. crannies a small narrow hole in a wall or rock
a long narrow depression in a surface
Quick; giddy; thoughtless
To crack into, or become full of, crannies
a small opening or crevice (especially in a rock face or wall)
{i} chink, crevice, crack, gap
any nook or cranny
Any part of a place; anywhere
any old nook or cranny
Alternative form of any nook or cranny
every old nook and cranny
Alternative form of every nook and cranny
nook and cranny
A place or part of a place, especially small or remote
nook or cranny
A part of a place, especially small or remote

There's not a nook or cranny that I haven't looked in.

crannied
{a} full of or having chinks
crannied
having small chinks or crannies (especially in or between rocks or stones); "a crannied wall
crannied
Having crannies, chinks, or fissures; as, a crannied wall
crannied
{s} having crannies
crannies
plural of cranny
nook and cranny
something remote; "he explored every nook and cranny of science
nook and cranny
something remote; "he explored every nook and cranny of science"
cranny

    Расстановка переносов

    cran·ny

    Турецкое произношение

    kräni

    Произношение

    /ˈkranē/ /ˈkræniː/

    Этимология

    [ 'kra-nE ] (noun.) 15th century. From Middle English crany, crani (“cranny”), apparently a diminutive of Middle English *cran (+ -y), from Old French cran, cren (“notch, fissure”), a derivative of Old French crener (“to notch, split”), from Medieval Latin crenō (“split”, verb), from Vulgar Latin *crinō (“split, break”, verb), of obscure origin. Despite a spurious use in Pliny, connection to Latin crēna is doubtful. Instead, probably of Germanic or Celtic origin. Compare Old High German chrinna (“notch, groove, crevice”), Alemannic German Krinne (“small crack, channel, groove”), Low Saxon karn (“notch, groove, crevice, cranny”), Old Irish ara-chrinin (“to perish, decay”).

    Слово дня

    dreary
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