cast iron

listen to the pronunciation of cast iron
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
pik demir
font
dökme demir

Dökme demir, bir demir ve karbon alaşımıdır. - Cast iron is an alloy of iron and carbon.

sert
pikten yapılmış
şiddetli
sağlam

Tom'un sağlam bir midesi var. İstediği şeyi yiyebiliyor. - Tom has a cast iron stomach. He can eat just about anything.

dayanıklı
pik
cast iron column
dökme demir kolon
cast iron electrode
dökme demir elektrot
cast iron pipe
dökme demir boru
cast-iron
demir gibi
cast-iron
sert
gray cast iron
(Mekanik) kir dökme demir
gray cast iron
(Otomotiv) pik döküm
gray cast iron
gri dökme demir
acicular cast iron
iğne biçimli dökme demir
alloy cast iron
alaşımlı dökme demir
annealed cast iron
tavlanmış dökme demir
austenitic cast iron
ostenitli dökme demir
corrosion resistant austenitic cast iron
aşınmaya dayanıklı östenitli dökme demir
high duty cast iron
dayanıklı döküm demiri
hypereutectic cast iron
hipertötektik dökme demir
hypoeutectic cast iron
hipoötektik dökme demir
malleable cast iron
dövülebilir dökme demir
cast-iron plate
(İnşaat) Dökme demir levha
gray cast iron
(Mühendislik) kır dökme demir
white cast iron
beyaz dökme demir
white cast iron
(Mühendislik) beyaz pik
alloy cast iron
dökme demir alaşımı
castiron
sağlam
castiron
şiddetli
castiron
sert
castiron
pikten yapılmış
castiron
dayanıklı
eutectic cast iron
(Kimya) ötektik dökme demir
malleable cast iron fittings
temper döküm teçhizatı
nickel cast iron
nikelli dökme demir
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
Inflexible or without exception

The school's cast-iron policy on admissions fees left no leeway for needy students.

Made of cast iron

I use a castiron skillet for frying pancakes.

A hard and brittle, but strong, alloy of iron, carbon, and silicon, formed by casting in a mould

Cast iron is popular for cookware where an even heating temperature is important.

Durable; tough; resiliant

Ernest has a cast-iron constitution and never gets sick.

A material used in fan manufacture Liquid iron is poured into a mold to produce a part This material was used at first for motor housings and bases of fans As manufacturing techniques progressed motor housings were made of stamped steel Eventually even the base was made of stamped steel
relatively pure iron, smelted from iron ore, containing 1 8 to 4 5% free carbon and cast to shape
A type of iron, mass-produced in the nineteenth century, created by pouring molten iron into a mold; used for ornament, garden furniture, and building parts
(See Pig Iron)
A cast-iron guarantee or alibi is one that is absolutely certain to be effective and will not fail you. They would have to offer cast-iron guarantees to invest in long-term projects. A hard, brittle, nonmalleable iron-carbon alloy, cast into shape, containing 2 to 4.5 percent carbon, 0.5 to 3 percent silicon, and lesser amounts of sulfur, manganese, and phosphorus. a type of iron that is hard, breaks easily, and is shaped in a mould. Alloy of iron that contains 2-4% carbon, along with silicon, manganese, and impurities. It is made by reducing iron ore in a blast furnace (cast iron is chemically the same as blast-furnace iron) and casting the liquid iron into ingots called pigs. Pig iron is remelted, along with scrap and alloying elements, in cupola furnaces and recast into molds for a variety of products. In the 18th-19th centuries, cast iron was a cheaper engineering material than wrought iron (not requiring intensive refining and hammering). It is more brittle and lacks tensile strength. Its compressive (load-bearing) strength made it the first important structural metal. In the 20th century, steel replaced it as a construction material, but cast iron still has industrial applications in automobile engine blocks, agricultural and machine parts, pipes, hollowware, stoves, and furnaces. Most cast iron is either so-called gray iron or white iron, the colours shown by fracture; gray iron contains more silicon and is less hard and more machinable than white iron. Both are brittle, but malleable cast iron (produced by prolonged heat-treating), first made in 18th-century France, was developed into an industrial product in the U.S. Cast iron that is ductile as cast was invented in 1948. The latter now constitutes a major family of metals, widely used for gears, dies, automobile crankshafts, and many other machine parts
Material used to manufacture such plumbing fixtures as sinks, bathtubs and lavatories Iron is formed by molding it while it is in a molten state It is then coated with an enamel powder which contains pigments to provide fixture color and is fired at extremely high temperatures This melts and fuses the enamel into a glass-like coating KOHLER Cast Iron will retain its beauty and durability for 50 years or more, making it truly a "once for a lifetime" purchase
forged iron, molded iron; strong, reinforced
an alloy of iron containing so much carbon that it is brittle and so cannot be wrought but must be shaped by casting
a ferrous alloy with carbon content between 2 and 4 5 wt%
Besides carbon, it contains sulphur, phosphorus, silica, etc
It can not be welded or forged, is brittle, and sometimes very hard
Cast iron is iron which contains a small amount of carbon. It is hard and cannot be bent so it has to be made into objects by casting. Made from cast iron, it is finished in graphite enamel. the cast-iron chair legs
Metallic iron containing more than 2% dissolved carbon within its matrix (as opposed to steel which contains less than 2%)and less than 4 5% Because of its cost, relative ease of manufacture and thermal stability cast iron (sometimes referred to as "gray cast iron" because of its characteristic color, but is actually a more specialized material for brake applications) is the material of choice for almost all automotive brake discs To work correctly, the parts must be produced at the foundry with tightly monitored chemistry and cooling cycles to control the shape, distribution and form of the precipitation of the excess carbon This is done to minimize distortion in machining, provide good wear characteristics, dampen vibration and resist cracking in subsequent use
Highly carbonized iron, the direct product of the blast furnace; used for making castings, and for conversion into wrought iron and steel
Also called pig iron Covers a large group of irons with 2% or more carbon The high quantity of carbon makes cast iron brittle and suitable for forming only by casting and machining It cannot be forged The lack of ductility, high stiffness and deadening qualities makes cast iron a superior material for machinery beds and frames Average density of cast iron, 7 377 g/cm3, 2665 lbs/cuin, 460 51 lbs/cuft
A generic term for a large family of cast ferrous alloys in which the carbon content exceeds solubility of carbon in austenite at the eutectic temperature Most cast irons contain at least 2% carbon, plus silicon and sulfur, and may or may not contain other alloying elements For the various forms gray cast iron, white cast iron, malleable cast iron and ductile cast iron, the word "cast" is often left out, resulting in "gray iron," "white iron," "malleable iron," and "ductile iron," respectively
Term used to describe a series of ferrous alloys containing over 1 74% of carbon
A hard, brittle iron produced commercially in blast furnaces by pouring it into molds where it cools and hardens Extensively used as a building material in the early 19th century, it was superseded by steel and ferroconcrete
a brittle iron cast from molten iron to a specific shape
Alternative spelling of cast iron
castiron
Alternative spelling of cast iron
cast-iron
extremely robust; "an iron constitution"
cast-iron
extremely robust; "an iron constitution
castiron
Hence, Fig
castiron
Made of cast iron
castiron
like cast iron; hardy; unyielding
cast iron
Избранное