calculus

listen to the pronunciation of calculus
Английский Язык - Турецкий язык
{i} hesap
(Tıp) kalkül

İntegral ve türev, kalkülüs'te iki ana işlemdir. - The two main operations in calculus are the integral and the derivative.

(Matematik) kalkülüs

İntegral ve türev, kalkülüs'te iki ana işlemdir. - The two main operations in calculus are the integral and the derivative.

(Matematik) işlence
kalkulus
(Diş Hekimliği) diştaşı
değişkenler hesabı
(Matematik) diferensiyel ve integral hesap
yüksek matematik
{i} taş böbrek
{i} safrakesesi vb
(Diş Hekimliği) genellikle üriner sistemde, safra kesesinde, tükrük bezlerinde, diş aralarında kalsiyum tuzlarının çökelmesi ile oluşan anormal taşlaşma; diş taşı
hesap differential calculus diferansiyel hesap
(isim) taş (böbrek, safrakesesi vb); hesap
taş/hesap
(Tıp) Herhangi bir organda oluşan taş, kalkül
(Bilgisayar) analiz
calculus of variations
(Matematik) varyasyonlar hesabı
calculus of variations
(Bilgisayar,Matematik) değişimler hesabı
calculus of probabilities
olasılık hesabı
calculus of probabilities
ihtimal hesabı
calculus of variations
değişkenler hesabı
calculus of probabilities
(Matematik) olasılıklar hesabı
calculus of probability
ihtimal hesabı
calculus of tensors
tensörler hesabı
bile calculus
(Anatomi) safra taşı
calculi
(Tıp) yumru
integral calculus
(Matematik) tümlev hesabı
integral calculus
entegral hesabı
vector calculus
(Matematik) vektörel hesap
vector calculus
(Matematik) vektör hesabı
biliary calculus
safra taşı
differential calculus
diferansiyel hesap
differential calculus
diferansiyel hasabı
infinitesimal calculus
sonsuz küçükler hasabı
integral calculus
integral hesabı
mental calculus
zihin hesabı
mental calculus
akıldan hesap
probability calculus
olasılık hesabı
renal calculus
böbrek taşı
urinary calculus
üriner taş
propositional calculus
(Felsefe) Önermeli mantık
algebraic calculus
cebir hesabı
algebraic calculus
cebirsel hesap
differential calculus
(Matematik) diferensiyel hesap
differential calculus
(Matematik) diferansiyel hesabı
differential calculus
diferansiyel hasabı,diferensiyal hesap
differential calculus
(Matematik) diferansiyel kalkülüs
integral calculus
integral hesabı/kalkülüsü
operational calculus
işlemsel kalkulus
probability calculus
ihtimal hesabı
propositional calculus
onermeler hesabi
salivary calculus
(Diş Hekimliği) 1. Tükürük bezi veya kanalında görülen taşlaşma. 2. Supraggingival diştaşı
subgingival calculus
(Diş Hekimliği) Diştaşı dişeti kenarının altında kalan, bu nedenle gözle görülemeyip, sadece sont vb. aletle buluna bilen, genellikle koyu kahve veya siyah renkte ve yerinden zor sökülür nitelikte diştaşı
tensor calculus
(Matematik) tansör hesabı
tensor calculus
(Matematik) gerey hesabı
urinary calculus
böbrek taşı
urinary calculus
mesane taşı
Английский Язык - Английский Язык
Deposits of calcium phosphate salts on teeth
Any formal system in which symbolic expressions are manipulated according to fixed rules

predicate calculus.

A stony concretion that forms in a bodily organ

renal calculus ( = kidney stone).

A decision-making method, especially one appropriate for a specialised realm
Differential calculus and integral calculus considered as a single subject; analysis
calculation, computation
a concretion formed in various parts of the body resembling a pebble in hardness
The branch of mathematics involving derivatives and integrals The study of motion in which changing values are studied
A method of computation or calculation in a special notation (like logic or symbolic logic) (You'll see this at the end of high school or in college )
This is a major theme of my research
Any solid concretion, formed in any part of the body, but most frequent in the organs that act as reservoirs, and in the passages connected with them; as, biliary calculi; urinary calculi, etc
A branch of mathematics [3: lessons, study guides ] A formal set of (mathematical) rules of a language applied to changing quantities to determine the result (value) of its (arithmetical) functions Two main branches are differential calculus, and integral calculus Differential calculus determines the rate of change of a quantity, while integral calculus finds the quantity where the rate of change is known "Functions" are defined by a formula
also known as tartar, calculus is hardened plaque that forms when you do not brush your teeth
a hard lump produced by the concretion of mineral salts; found in hollow organs or ducts of the body; "renal calculi can be very painful"
hardened plaque
Differential calculus and integral calculus considered as a single subject
concretion occurring within organism, made up in whole or in part of mineral salts
the branch of mathematics that is concerned with limits and with the differentiation and integration of functions
The hard deposit of mineralized plaque that forms on the crown and/or root of the tooth Also referred to as tartar
an incrustation that forms on the teeth and gums
a hard deposit of calcified plaque which is found around the neck of the tooth When it is above the free gingival margin (supra-gingival) it is white and chalky When it is below (sub-gingival) it is dark and hard
hard residue, ranging from yellow to brown, forming on teeth when oral hygiene is incomplete or improper
A method of calculation One of several highly systematic methods of treating nproblems by a special system of algebraic notations
A branch of mathematics divided into two general fields: differential calculus and integral calculus Differential calculus can be used to find rates of change, like orbits of planets, satellites, and spacecraft Integral calculus is a method of calculating quantities by splitting them up into a large number of small parts It can be used to find the surface area of irregular objects You can find out the total surface area of your car (even the round parts) by using integral calculus Source: Children's Encyclopedia Britannica vol 3, p 308-309, 1989
a special form of algebra good for studying constantly changing systems Mathematicians disagree whether calculus was invented by Sir Isaac Newton or by Gottfried Liebnitz Either way, calculus gave mathematicians the tool they needed to study scientific phenomena like gravity and accelerating movement
the branch of mathematics that is concerned with limits and with the differentiation and integration of functions a hard lump produced by the concretion of mineral salts; found in hollow organs or ducts of the body; "renal calculi can be very painful
A branch of mathematics involved with the limit of series of numbers and the value of a function when its variable approaches a particular value Applications are finding the area under a curve (the area under a speed-time graph gives the distance covered in that time) and the gradient or tangent of curves (the gradient of a distance-time graph at a particular time gives the speed at that point)
Calculus is a branch of advanced mathematics which deals with variable quantities. the part of mathematics that deals with changing quantities, such as the speed of a falling stone or the slope of a curved line (from calx; CHALK). Field of mathematics that analyzes aspects of change in processes or systems that can be modeled by functions. Through its two primary tools the derivative and the integral it allows precise calculation of rates of change and of the total amount of change in such a system. The derivative and the integral grew out of the idea of a limit, the logical extension of the concept of a function over smaller and smaller intervals. The relationship between differential calculus and integral calculus, known as the fundamental theorem of calculus, was discovered in the late 17th century independently by Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Calculus was one of the major scientific breakthroughs of the modern era. differential calculus fundamental theorem of calculus integral calculus renal calculus predicate calculus propositional calculus
A method of computation; any process of reasoning by the use of symbols; any branch of mathematics that may involve calculation
{i} method of mathematical computation; abnormal mineral buildup in the body; gravel; small cup-like structure (Anatomy); system composed of many complex parts
calc
calculus of variations
The form of calculus that deals with the maxima and minima of definite integrals of functions of many variables
calculus of functions
calculation of functions
calculus of probabilities
calculation of likelihood or probabilities
calculus of variations
Mathematical analysis of the maxima and minima of definite integrals, the integrands of which are functions of independent variables, dependent variables, and the derivatives of one or more dependent variables
calculus of variations
the calculus of maxima and minima of definite integrals
Kirby calculus
A method in geometric topology for modifying framed links in the 3-sphere using a finite set of moves (the Kirby moves)
calculus.
infinitesimal analysis

The fluxionary and differential calculus may be considered two modifications of one general method, aptly distinguished by the name of the infinitesimal analysis..

dental calculus
a hard crust of calcium salts and food particles on the teeth
differential calculus
The calculus that deals with instantaneous rates of change
felicific calculus
A quasi-mathematical technique proposed by 19th-century utilitarian ethical theorists for determining the net amount of happiness, pleasure, or utility resulting from an action, sometimes regarded as a precursor of cost-benefit analysis

Bentham's way of becoming the Newton of the moral world was to develop the felicific calculus..

hedonic calculus
Alternative name of felicific calculus
hedonistic calculus
Alternative name of felicific calculus
implicational propositional calculus
A minimalist version of propositional calculus which uses only the logical connectives \to ("implies") and \bot ("false")
infinitesimal calculus
Differential calculus and integral calculus considered together as a single subject
integral calculus
The calculus that generalizes summation to find areas, masses, volumes, sums, and totals of quantities described by continuously varying functions
lambda calculus
Any of a family of functionally complete algebraic systems in which lambda expressions are evaluated according to a fixed set of rules to produce values, which may themselves be lambda expressions
logical calculus
A formal system
predicate calculus
The branch of logic that deals with quantified statements such as "there exists an x such that..." or "for any x, it is the case that...", where x is a member of the domain of discourse
propositional calculus
propositional logic
utility calculus
Alternative name of felicific calculus
propositional calculus
(Felsefe) A branch of symbolic logic dealing with propositions as units and with their combinations and the connectives that relate them, propositional logic
propositional calculus
(Felsefe) The branch of symbolic logic that uses symbols for unanalyzed propositions and logical connectives only ― called also sentential calculus
sentential calculus
(Felsefe) The branch of symbolic logic that uses symbols for unanalyzed propositions and logical connectives only ― called also propositional calculus
biliary calculus
gallstone, stonelike mass which forms in the gallbladder
calculi
plural of calculus
dental calculus
tartar, incrustation on the teeth
differential and integral calculus
branch of mathematics that deals with functions
differential calculus
branch of mathematics that deals with functions
differential calculus
a way of measuring the speed at which an object is moving at a particular moment. Branch of mathematical analysis, devised by Isaac Newton and G.W. Leibniz, and concerned with the problem of finding the rate of change of a function with respect to the variable on which it depends. Thus it involves calculating derivatives and using them to solve problems involving nonconstant rates of change. Typical applications include finding maximum and minimum values of functions in order to solve practical problems in optimization
differential calculus
the part of calculus that deals with the variation of a function with respect to changes in the independent variable (or variables) by means of the concepts of derivative and differential
fundamental theorem of calculus
Basic principle of calculus. It relates the derivative to the integral and provides the principal method for evaluating definite integrals (see differential calculus; integral calculus). In brief, it states that any function that is continuous (see continuity) over an interval has an antiderivative (a function whose rate of change, or derivative, equals the function) on that interval. Further, the definite integral of such a function over an interval a x b is the difference F(b) -F(a), where F is an antiderivative of the function. This particularly elegant theorem shows the inverse function relationship of the derivative and the integral and serves as the backbone of the physical sciences. It was articulated independently by Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
infinitesimal calculus
Differential and integral calculus
infinitesimal calculus
branch of mathematics which includes both differential and integral calculus
integral calculus
The study of integration and its uses, such as in finding volumes, areas, and solutions of differential equations. Branch of calculus concerned with the theory and applications of integrals. While differential calculus focuses on rates of change, such as slopes of tangent lines and velocities, integral calculus deals with total size or value, such as lengths, areas, and volumes. The two branches are connected by the fundamental theorem of calculus, which shows how a definite integral is calculated by using its antiderivative (a function whose rate of change, or derivative, equals the function being integrated). For example, integrating a velocity function yields a distance function, which enables the distance traveled by an object over an interval of time to be calculated. As a result, much of integral calculus deals with the derivation of formulas for finding antiderivatives. The great utility of the subject emanates from its use in solving differential equations
integral calculus
the part of calculus that deals with integration and its application in the solution of differential equations and in determining areas or volumes etc
integral calculus
branch of mathematics dealing with determining methods of calculating lengths areas and volumes
predicate calculus
The branch of symbolic logic that deals not only with relations between propositions as a whole but also with their internal structure, especially the relation between subject and predicate. Symbols are used to represent the subject and predicate of the proposition, and the existential or universal quantifier is used to denote whether the proposition is universal or particular in its application. Part of modern symbolic logic which systematically exhibits the logical relations between propositions involving quantifiers such as "all" and "some. " The predicate calculus usually builds on some form of the propositional calculus and introduces quantifiers, individual variables, and predicate letters. A sentence of the form "All F's are either G's or H's" is symbolically rendered as (x)[Fx (Gx Hx)], and "Some F's are both G's and H's" is symbolically rendered as (x)[Fx (Gx Hx)]. Once conditions of truth and falsity for the basic types of propositions have been determined, the propositions formulable within the calculus are grouped into three mutually exclusive classes: (1) those that are true on every possible specification of the meaning of their predicate signs, such as "Everything is F or is not F"; (2) those false on every such specification, such as "Something is F and not F"; and (3) those true on some specifications and false on others, such as "Something is F and is G." These are called, respectively, the valid, inconsistent, and contingent propositions. Certain valid proposition types may be selected as axioms or as the basis for rules of inference. There exist multiple complete axiomatizations of first-order (or lower) predicate calculus ("first-order" meaning that quantifiers bind individual variables but not variables ranging over predicates of individuals). See also logic
predicate calculus
a system of symbolic logic that represents individuals and predicates and quantification over individuals (as well as the relations between propositions)
propositional calculus
The branch of symbolic logic that deals with the relationships formed between propositions by connectives such as and, or, and if as opposed to their internal structure. Formal system of propositions and their logical relationships. As opposed to the predicate calculus, the propositional calculus employs simple, unanalyzed propositions rather than predicates as its atomic units. Simple (atomic) propositions are denoted by lowercase Roman letters (e.g., p, q), and compound (molecular) propositions are formed using the standard symbols for "and," for "or," for "if . . . then," and for "not." As a formal system, the propositional calculus is concerned with determining which formulas (compound proposition forms) are provable from the axioms. Valid inferences among propositions are reflected by the provable formulas, because (for any formulas A and B) A B is provable if and only if B is a logical consequence of A. The propositional calculus is consistent in that there exists no formula A in it such that both A and A are provable. It is also complete in the sense that the addition of any unprovable formula as a new axiom would introduce a contradiction. Further, there exists an effective procedure for deciding whether a given formula is provable in the system. See also logic, predicate calculus, laws of thought
renal calculus
kidney stone
urinary calculus
A hard mass of mineral salts in the urinary tract. Also called cystolith, urolith
urinary calculus
stone in the urinary tract
uterine calculus
stone in the uterus
Турецкий язык - Английский Язык

Определение calculus в Турецкий язык Английский Язык словарь

Calculi
(Tıp) Safra Taşı gibi taşlar ve katı şişlikler(Yumru)
calculus

    Расстановка переносов

    cal·cu·lus

    Турецкое произношение

    kälkyılıs

    Произношение

    /ˈkalkyələs/ /ˈkælkjələs/

    Этимология

    [ -l&s ] (noun.) 1666. Latin calculus (“a latin word meaning pebble or stone used for counting”), diminutive of calx (“limestone”) + -ulus.

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    Слово дня

    ranine
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