pumice

listen to the pronunciation of pumice
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
To abrade or roughen with pumice
A light, porous type of pyroclastic igneous rock, formed during explosive volcanic eruptions when liquid lava is ejected into the air as a froth containing masses of gas bubbles. As the lava solidifies, the bubbles are frozen into the rock

The wind blew close to the ground - it rooted among the tussock grass - slithered along the road, so that the white pumice dust swirled in our faces - settled and sifted over us and was like a dry-skin itching for growth on our bodies.

{n} a spungy stone full of hole, apples or other fruit bruised or mashed
A volcanic rock full of cavities and very light in weight; used especially in powder form for smoothing and polishing
A light vesicular form of volcanic glass with a high silica content; it is usually light in colour and will float on water
in the form of powder, for smoothing and polishing
A very light porous volcanic scoria, usually of a gray color, the pores of which are capillary and parallel, giving it a fibrous structure
A volcanic glass often used in powder form to polish and smooth a surface
A light-colored volcanic rock containing abundant trapped gas bubbles formed by the explosive eruption of magma Because of its numerous gas bubbles, pumice commonly floats on water
A light-colored volcanic rock containing lots of bubbles from trapped gases This rock can sometimes float on water
It is supposed to be produced by the disengagement of watery vapor without liquid or plastic lava
Volcanic rock used in a variety of forms in metalsmithing Pumice rocks are used as an abrasive in creating a mirror finish in holloware Lump pumice is used as a heat reflective material in annealing trays Powdered pumice is ground to different grades or grits for use as an abrasive Powdered pumice is also sometimes used as a component of pitch
Volcanic glass, used in powdered form as pounce on parchment; in its consilidated form, it was employed to scrape parchment for reuse as a palimpsest
A fine pumice powder used in the polishing process Usually available in 90 and 180 grades
Pumice is a kind of grey stone from a volcano and is very light in weight. It can be rubbed over surfaces, especially your skin, that you want to clean or make smoother. = pumice stone. Very porous, frothlike volcanic glass that has long been used as an abrasive in cleaning, polishing, and scouring compounds. It is also used in precast masonry units, poured concrete, insulation and acoustic tile, and plaster. Pumice is igneous rock that cooled so rapidly there was no time for it to crystallize. When it solidified, the vapours dissolved in it were suddenly released, and the whole mass swelled up into a froth that immediately consolidated. Any type of lava may become pumiceous under favourable conditions
Light-colored, frothy volcanic rock, usually of dacite or rhyolite composition, formed by the expansion of gas in erupting lava Commonly seen as lumps or fragments of pea-size and larger, but can also occur abundantly as ash-sized particles
A light-colored vesicular, volcanic rock of siliceous or intermediate composition Pumice has such a low density that it floats on water
A very light, porous volcanic rock that forms during explosive eruptions During the eruption, volcanic gases dissolved in the liquid portion of magma expand very rapidly to create a foam or froth; the liquid part of the froth then quickly solidifies to glass around the gas bubbles All types of magma (basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite) can form pumice, but it is usually associated with acidic magmas (e g Rhyolite) Pumice is mined as an additive to abrasive materials
A fine abrasive powder that is made from volcanic ash Pumice is used with a a felt block in woodworking to rub out (polish) a finish (Pumice is also the gritty additive in Lava soap )
Actually volcanic glass, this stone was liquid, melted rock when it was expelled from a volcano The air cooled it so quickly that it didn’t form crystals again, but filled with tiny holes In Lewis and Clark's time pumice was valued as a gentle abrasive, and it still is
A light vesicular form of volcanic glass with a high silica content; it is usually light in color and will float on water
Called also pumice stone
It is much used, esp
Light rock froth produced by the violent separation of gas from lava Because of the many gas bubbles, some of this froth is so light that it floats on water
a light glass formed on the surface of some lavas; used as an abrasive
{i} variety of light spongy volcanic rock (used as an abrasive)
A light-colored volcanic rock that contains a large number of vesicles and has a composition similar to rhyolite
A light-colored, frothy volcanic rock, usually of dacite or rhyolite composition, formed by the expansion of gas in erupting lava Commonly perceived as lumps or fragments of pea size and larger but can also occur abundantly as ash-size particles Because of its numerous gas bubbles, pumice commonly floats on water
pumice stone
A piece of pumice; also used as a collective noun

in the midst a little riuer plaide / Emongst the pumy stones, which seemd to plaine / With gentle murmure, that his course they did restraine.

pumice stones
plural form of pumice stone
pumice stone
A pumice stone is a piece of pumice that you rub over your skin in order to clean the skin or make it smoother
pumice stone
Same as Pumice
pumice stone
Pumice stone is the same as pumice
pumice

    الواصلة

    pum·ice

    التركية النطق

    pʌmıs

    النطق

    /ˈpəməs/ /ˈpʌməs/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    [ p&-m&s ] (noun.) 15th century. From Latin pūmex (“pumice stone”)

    الازمنة

    pumicing, pumiced

    كلمة اليوم

    languid
المفضلات