marcel

listen to the pronunciation of marcel
الإنجليزية - التركية

تعريف marcel في الإنجليزية التركية القاموس.

marcel wave
marsel saç biçimi
of, producing, or related to marcel waves
Üreten ya da dalgalar marcel ile ilgili bir
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
A male given name occasionally borrowed from French
To wave hair by the marcel method
Of, producing, or related to marcel waves
To wave; as, marcelled potato crisps
A hairstyle characterized by deep waves made by a curling iron
A marcel wave
occasionally borrowed from French
{i} male first name; family name (French)
Aymé Marcel Breuer Marcel Lajos Carné Marcel Dassault Marcel Marcel Bloch Duchamp Marcel Marceau Marcel Marcel Gabriel Honoré Mauss Marcel Poulenc Francis Jean Marcel Proust Marcel
make a marcel in a woman's hair
{i} curls in hair, marcel wave, hairstyle with deep natural looking waves made by a heated curling iron (in the style of the French hairdresser Marcel Grateau)
a hairdo characterized by deep regular waves that are made by a heated curling iron make a marcel in a woman's hair
{f} set hair in waves, style with regular waves using a heated curling iron (in the style of the French hairdresser Marcel Grateau)
a hairdo characterized by deep regular waves that are made by a heated curling iron
marcel wave
A deep artificial wave in the hair produced by heated curling tongs

References: OED, 2nd edition.

Marcel Breuer
born May 21, 1902, Pécs, Hung. died July 1, 1981, New York, N.Y., U.S. Hungarian-U.S. architect and furniture designer. He studied and then taught at the Bauhaus (1920-28), where in 1925 he invented the famous tubular steel chair. He moved to Cambridge, Mass., in 1937 to teach at Harvard University and practice with Walter Gropius. Their synthesis of Bauhaus internationalism with New England regional wood-frame building greatly influenced domestic architecture throughout the U.S. He was one of the most influential exponents of the International Style. His major architectural commissions include UNESCO's Paris headquarters (1953-58) and the Whitney Museum of American Art (1966)
Marcel Dassault
orig. Marcel Bloch born Jan. 22, 1892, Paris, France died April 18, 1986, Paris French aircraft designer and industrialist. He designed aircraft during World War I, and in 1930 he started his own company to build military and civilian airplanes. Sent to Buchenwald as a Jew during World War II, he later changed his last name (to that of his brother's byname in the Resistance) and resumed his business. His company produced Europe's first supersonic plane, the Mystère, and in 1956 began production of the Mirage warplane, which would be acquired by countries worldwide
Marcel Duchamp
(1887-1968) French artist, developer of the "readymade" art form, co-founder of Dadaism in New York and Paris
Marcel Duchamp
a French painter and sculptor who was important in developing the styles of cubism, futurism, and Dadaism (1887-1968). born July 28, 1887, Blainville, France died Oct. 2, 1968, Neuilly French artist and art innovator. In 1913 he caused a sensation at the Armory Show with his painting Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (1912), which combined the principles of Cubism and Futurism. His irreverence for conventional aesthetic standards then led him to devise his famous ready-mades: in 1913 he exhibited Bicycle Wheel, which was simply an ordinary bicycle wheel displayed as a work of art, and in 1917 he exhibited a urinal he entitled Fountain. Intended as a derisive gesture against the excessive importance attached to works of art, the ready-mades ushered in an era when contemporary art became in itself a mixture of creation and criticism. In Paris in 1919 he established contact with the Dada group of artists, whose nihilistic ideas he had anticipated. During this period he exhibited a photograph of the Mona Lisa with a moustache and goatee added, a gesture that expressed the Dadaists' scorn for the art of the past. He greatly influenced the Surrealists, and his attitude toward art and society led to Pop art and other modern and postmodern movements. A legend in his lifetime, he is considered one of the leading spirits of 20th-century art
Marcel Grateau
{i} (1852-1936) French hairdresser who in 1872 created a new natural looking wave by turning the curling iron upside down
Marcel Lajos Breuer
born May 21, 1902, Pécs, Hung. died July 1, 1981, New York, N.Y., U.S. Hungarian-U.S. architect and furniture designer. He studied and then taught at the Bauhaus (1920-28), where in 1925 he invented the famous tubular steel chair. He moved to Cambridge, Mass., in 1937 to teach at Harvard University and practice with Walter Gropius. Their synthesis of Bauhaus internationalism with New England regional wood-frame building greatly influenced domestic architecture throughout the U.S. He was one of the most influential exponents of the International Style. His major architectural commissions include UNESCO's Paris headquarters (1953-58) and the Whitney Museum of American Art (1966)
Marcel Marceau
born March 22, 1923, Strasbourg, France French mime. After serving in World War II, he studied with the pantomimist Étienne Decroux and had his first success in the role of Arlequin in Baptiste. He formed a mime troupe (1948-64) and earned worldwide acclaim in the 1950s with his production of the "mimodrama" of Nikolay Gogol's Overcoat. In 1978 he founded a school of mimodrama in Paris. He is noted for his eloquent, deceptively simple portrayals, including his celebrated white-faced character Bip, reminiscent of Pierrot and of Charlie Chaplin's tramp. See also mime and pantomime
Marcel Marceau
{i} (1923-2007) famous French pantomimist and actor
Marcel Mauss
born May 10, 1872, Épinal, Fr. died Feb. 10, 1950, Paris French sociologist and anthropologist. Mauss was the nephew of Émile Durkheim, who contributed much to his intellectual formation and with whom he collaborated in such important works as Suicide (1897) and Primitive Classification (1901-02). His most influential independent work was The Gift (1925), a highly original comparative study of the relation between forms of gift exchange and social structure. He taught at the École Pratique des Hautes Études and Collège de France and cofounded the University of Paris's Institut d'Ethnologie. His views on ethnological theory and method influenced Claude Lévi-Strauss, A.R. Radcliffe-Brown, Bronisaw Malinowski, and Edward Evans-Pritchard
Marcel Proust
(1871-1922) French writer, author of "Remembrance of Things Past
Marcel Proust
a French writer of novels, who many people consider one of the greatest writers of modern times. His best known work is a series of novels called in English Remembrance of Things Past, which is a detailed description of French society in the late 19th century, and is sometimes mentioned as a typical example of a very long book. Many people also know how the book begins, when one of the characters eats a "madeleine" (=a type of small cake) and the taste reminds him of an earlier time (1871-1922). born July 10, 1871, Auteuil, near Paris, France died Nov. 18, 1922, Paris French novelist. Born to a wealthy family, he studied law and literature. His social connections allowed him to become an observant habitué of the most exclusive drawing rooms of the nobility, and he wrote social pieces for Parisian journals. He published essays and stories, including the story collection Pleasures and Days (1896). He had suffered from asthma since childhood, and 1897 he began to disengage from social life as his health declined. Half-Jewish himself, he became a major supporter of Alfred Dreyfus in the affair that made French anti-Semitism into a national issue. Deeply affected by his mother's death in 1905, he withdrew further from society. An incident of involuntary revival of childhood memory in 1909 led him to retire almost totally into an eccentric seclusion in his cork-lined bedroom to write À la recherche du temps perdu (1913-27; In Search of Lost Time, or Remembrance of Things Past). The vast seven-part novel is at once a kind of autobiography, a vast social panorama of France in the years just before and during World War I, and an immense meditation on love and jealousy and on art and its relation to reality. One of the supreme achievements in fiction of all time, it brought him worldwide fame and affected the entire climate of the 20th-century novel
Francis Jean Marcel Poulenc
born Jan. 7, 1899, Paris, Fr. died Jan. 30, 1963, Paris French composer. In his teens he studied piano with Ricardo Viñes (1875-1943). Influenced by Erik Satie, Poulenc and five other like-minded young composers became known as Les Six. Poulenc wrote piano compositions, orchestral music, and chamber music, but he is best known for his vocal music, including many admired songs, the operas The Breasts of Tiresias (1944), Dialogues of the Carmelites (1956), and La voix humaine (1958), and such sacred choral works as Mass in G Major (1937), the Stabat Mater (1950), and the Gloria (1959), reflecting his devout Catholicism
Gabriel Marcel
born Dec. 7, 1889, Paris, France died Oct. 8, 1973, Paris French philosopher, dramatist, and critic. His philosophical works explore aspects of human existence (e.g., trust, fidelity, hope, and despair) which had traditionally been dismissed as unamenable to philosophical consideration. His use of phenomenology was independent of the work of Edmund Husserl, considered the founder of the phenomenological movement. Marcel was the first French proponent of existentialism
marcel
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