judah

listen to the pronunciation of judah
الإنجليزية - التركية
Yahuda
praised
övülmüş
praised
{f} öv

Oğlunu övdüğümde çok dikkatlice dinledi. - She listened very carefully when I praised her son.

İnsanlar onu cesaretinden dolayı övdü. - The people praised him for his courage.

praised
övülen
الإنجليزية - الإنجليزية
A male given name
Fourth son of Jacob, by his wife Leah
One of the Israelite tribes, descended from Judah, from which David and his lineage came
The name of the southern Israelite kingdom which continued to be ruled by the Davidic dynasty after Solomon's death and the breakup of the united monarchy, with the northern portion keeping the name Israel
in the Old Testament of the Bible, one of Jacob's sons. One of the 12 tribes of Israel, descended from Judah, the fourth son of Jacob. The tribe of Judah entered Canaan with the other Israelites after the escape from Egypt and settled in the region south of Jerusalem. It eventually became the most powerful tribe, producing the kings David and Solomon, and it was prophesied that the messiah would come from among its members. After the 10 northern tribes were dispersed by the Assyrian conquest of 721 BC, the tribes of Judah and Benjamin were left as the sole inheritors of the Mosaic covenant. Judah flourished until 586 BC, when it was overrun by the Babylonians and many of its people were carried into exile. Cyrus II allowed them to return in 538 BC, and the Temple of Jerusalem was rebuilt. The history of Judah from that time forward is the history of the Jews and Judaism. The kingdom of Judah was succeeded by Judaea. Alkalai Judah ben Solomon Hai Benjamin Judah Philip Eleazar ben Judah of Worms Eleazar ben Judah ben Kalonymos Ibn Tibbon Judah ben Saul Judah ben Samuel Judah ha Nasi Magnes Judah Leon
The name of the southern Israelite kingdom which continued to be ruled by the Davidic dynasty after Solomons death and the breakup of the united monarchy, with the northern portion keeping the name Israel
{i} Jacob's fourth son (Biblical); one of the 12 tribes of Israel (Biblical); Hebrew kingdom in southern Palestine; male first name
praised
Jacob's fourth son, he was the ancestor of the tribe of Judah; Judah became the name of the southern kingdom after the northern ten tribes separated from Judah and Benjamin See Biblical Story, Chapter 2
an ancient kingdom of southern Palestine with Jerusalem as its center
an ancient kingdom of southern Palestine with Jerusalem as its center (Old Testament) the fourth son of Jacob who was forebear of one of the tribes of Israel; one of his descendants was to be the Messiah
(Micah 1: 1) Southern kingdom of the nation of Israel
Hebrew Yehudah 1) One of the 12 patriarchs (sons of Israel) 2) The tribe descended from him 3) That tribe's allotment in the promised land 4) After the political division of the country following Solomon's reign, the Southern Kingdom, consisting of the tribes of Benjamin and Judah
An Israelite kingdom centred on Jerusalem before 587 BCE, also known as the Southern Kingdom
(Old Testament) the fourth son of Jacob who was forebear of one of the tribes of Israel; one of his descendants was to be the Messiah
Judah Halevi
(c1075-1141) Jewish-Spanish poet philosopher and physician, author of the "Book of the Khazar" and "Ode to Zion
Judah Leon Magnes
born July 5, 1877, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Oct. 27, 1948, New York, N.Y. U.S.-born Israeli educator and religious leader. Ordained as a rabbi in 1900, he earned a doctorate at the University of Heidelberg in 1902. Serving as rabbi for three congregations in New York, he moved from Reform to Orthodox Judaism and became a Zionist. He drifted away from Zionism during World War I, preferring relief efforts for Jews in Palestine over political activism. After the war he became the principal founder and first president (1935-48) of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, working to advance Arab-Jewish reconciliation and advocating a binational Arab-Jewish state
Judah P Benjamin
born Aug. 6, 1811, St. Croix, Virgin Islands died May 6, 1884, Paris, France Prominent lawyer in the U.S. and Britain and member of the Confederate cabinet. He moved with his parents from St. Croix to South Carolina in his early youth. In 1832 he began building a successful law practice in New Orleans. He was the first Jew elected to the U.S. Senate (1853-61), where he was noted for his proslavery speeches. After the South seceded, Jefferson Davis appointed him attorney general (1861), secretary of war (1861-62), and secretary of state (1862-65). Late in the war he enraged many white Southerners by urging that slaves be recruited into the Confederate army and emancipated after their term of service. At the end of the war he escaped to England, where he was called to the bar (1866) and served as queen's counsel (1872)
Judah Philip Benjamin
born Aug. 6, 1811, St. Croix, Virgin Islands died May 6, 1884, Paris, France Prominent lawyer in the U.S. and Britain and member of the Confederate cabinet. He moved with his parents from St. Croix to South Carolina in his early youth. In 1832 he began building a successful law practice in New Orleans. He was the first Jew elected to the U.S. Senate (1853-61), where he was noted for his proslavery speeches. After the South seceded, Jefferson Davis appointed him attorney general (1861), secretary of war (1861-62), and secretary of state (1862-65). Late in the war he enraged many white Southerners by urging that slaves be recruited into the Confederate army and emancipated after their term of service. At the end of the war he escaped to England, where he was called to the bar (1866) and served as queen's counsel (1872)
Judah ben Samuel
died 1217 Jewish mystic and scholar. He was a member of the Kalonymos family, which provided medieval Germany with many Jewish mystics and spiritual leaders. Around 1195 he settled in Regensburg, where he founded a yeshiva and gathered disciples such as Eleazar ben Judah of Worms. He was the founder of 12th-century German Hasidism, an ultrapious movement not directly related to 18th-century Hasidism. Book of the Pious, a compilation of the writings of Judah, his father, and Eleazar of Worms, offers a detailed manual of conduct for observant Jews; it is one of the most important documents of medieval Judaism
Judah ben Saul Ibn Tibbon
born 1120, Granada, Spain died 1190, Marseille Jewish physician and translator. Persecutions of the Jews forced him to flee Spain, and he settled in southern France in 1150 to practice medicine. His translations of philosophical works by Arabic-speaking Jews helped disseminate Arabic and Greek culture in medieval Europe. His son and grandson were also noted scholars and translators
Judah ben Solomon Hai Alkalai
born 1798, Sarajevo, Bosnia, Ottoman Empire died 1878, Jerusalem Sephardic rabbi. Raised in Jerusalem, he became rabbi at Semlin, Croatia. He argued that a physical return to Israel (Palestine), rather than a symbolic return through repentance and practice, was necessary for the salvation of the Jewish people, a view that put him at odds with Jewish orthodoxy. He saw the anti-Semitic Damascus Affair of 1840 as part of a divine plan to reawaken Jews to the reality of their condition in exile. Unsuccessful in gaining support for Jewish immigration to Palestine, he himself settled in the Holy Land in 1871. His writings helped pave the way for Zionism
Judah ha-Nasi
born AD 135 died 220 Palestinian Jewish scholar. A descendant of the great sage Hillel, he was patriarch of the Jewish community in Palestine and head of its Sanhedrin, and he became an important figure in early rabbinic Judaism. He spent over 50 years studying the oral law and is said to have compiled it into six sections divided by subject matter, thus creating the Mishna. His exact role in the Mishna's redaction is not known; other scholars such as Meïr and Akiba ben Joseph were probably also involved
Lion of Judah
Jesus Christ
Lion of Judah
the emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia
Eleazar ben Judah of Worms
orig. Eleazar ben Judah ben Kalonymos born 1160, Mainz, Franconia died 1238, Worms German Jewish mystic and Talmudic scholar. His wife and daughters were killed by Crusaders in 1196, but he nevertheless continued to teach a doctrine of love of humanity. After studying with Judah ben Samuel, to whom he was related, he became a rabbi at Worms (1201). Eleazar attempted to unify the mysticism of the Kabbala with the Talmud. His greatest work was his ethical code, Rokeah (1505). He believed that God himself was unknowable but that the kavod, a ruling angel that was an emanation from God, was knowable. His writings are a major source of information on medieval Hasidism
Young Judah
American zionist Jewish youth movement
judah

    الواصلة

    Ju·dah

    التركية النطق

    cudı

    النطق

    /ˈʤo͞odə/ /ˈʤuːdə/

    علم أصول الكلمات

    [ 'jü-d& ] (noun.) Old Testament Hebrew יְהוּדָה (Yehuda), a son of Jacob.

    كلمة اليوم

    maquillage
المفضلات